Review: ‘The Call of the Wild’ (2020), starring Harrison Ford

February 21, 2020

by Carla Hay

Harrison Ford in "The Call of the Wild"
Harrison Ford in “The Call of the Wild” (Photo courtesy of 20th Century Studios)

“The Call of the Wild”

Directed by Chris Sanders

Culture Representation: Taking place primarily in Alaska during the 1890s Gold Rush era, the action-adventure film “The Call of the Wild” has a predominantly white cast that represent the working-class and middle-class whose lives are touched in some way by a very lovable and determined St. Bernard/Farm Collie mix dog.

Culture Clash: The characters have conflicts over greed for gold, as well as ownership of the dog.

Culture Audience: “The Call of the Wild” is a family-friendly film that will appeal to fans of Harrison Ford and people who love dogs.

Omar Sy in “The Call of the Wild” (Photo courtesy of 20th Century Studios)

“The Call of the Wild” takes Jack London ‘s classic 1903 novel on which it based and turns it into live-action/animated hybrid adventure story with moments that are heartwarming, heartbreaking and unapologetically sentimental. The story, which takes place during the 1890s, centers on a St. Bernard/Farm Collie mix dog named Buck, who teaches the humans quite a few things about bravery and emotional intelligence. Harrison Ford receives top billing in the movie, but viewers who don’t know the book’s original story should know that his John Thornton character is mainly in the latter half of the story, although his voiceover narration is throughout the film. The movie keeps most of the plot points the same as the original story, but there are also some changes from the novel.

When viewers first see Buck, he’s living a pampered life in Santa Clara, California, with Judge Miller (played by Bradley Whitford), his wife Katie (played by Jean Louisa Kelly) and their family. Buck is playful and mischievous—so much so, that he ruins the family’s Thanksgiving dinner by trashing the table and eating the entire Thanksgiving feast. Judge Miller gets angry but he’s a kind dog owner who doesn’t abuse his pet.

One night, Buck is stolen by a man who sells the dog to an abusive sailor, who hits Buck with a club and keeps him confined. There are scenes of animal cruelty that might be a little disturbing to very sensitive viewers. Buck is on a ship that is headed to Alaska. Through ingenuity, luck and a will to fight, Buck escapes his cruel owner and finds himself homeless in Dawson City, Alaska. He is taken by an old man, who doesn’t treat Buck much better than the sailor, so Buck runs away again.

While Buck is escaping, he runs into a gold prospector named John Thornton (played by Ford), a recluse who’s come into town for errands. Buck finds John’s harmonica on the street, and John is struck by how intelligent the dog seems to be. Unfortunately, Buck’s old man owner catches up to Buck and he’s back in captivity again.

Buck is eventually taken to a dog pound, where he’s bought by Perrault (played by Omar Sy), a French Canadian who runs a dog-sled service that delivers mail. Perrault immediately warms up to Buck, but his jaded assistant Francoise (played by Cara Gee) isn’t too fond of the dog at first. (In the novel, the dog-sled operators were two men named Perrault and Francois.) Perrault makes Buck part of the dog-sled team, which is lead by an arrogant alpha male Siberian husky named Spitz. The rest of the dogs are of various large-sized breeds.

The dog-sled work is grueling, especially when it’s in the snow, but Buck is a quick learner and he makes friends with the rest of the dogs, except for Spitz. For example, there’s a scene where Spitz makes the other dogs wait for him to finish drinking water from an icy lake, but Buck takes his paws to break open the ice to create a new place where the dogs can drink without waiting for Spitz.

It’s worth mentioning that the CGI visual effects for the animals start off looking very unrealistic, but they get better during the course of the movie. The animals have very humanistic facial expressions and movements, so don’t expect this movie to be completely realistic. You also have to suspend disbelief at some of the superhuman stunts that Buck is able to do. However, the movie doesn’t go too far with the human characteristics for the animals—the animals don’t cry, walk like humans, or talk in human languages—so overall the ways that the animals are presented are mostly realistic.

Whenever there’s an action movie that takes place near a frozen body of water, the inevitable happens: Someone falls through the ice into the water. This happens to Francoise, but of course Buck is there to rescue her and save her life. Her attitude toward Buck starts to change after that incident. She begrudgingly admits to Buck that she underestimated him and that he’s impressed her the most out of all of the dogs in the pack. And wouldn’t you know, Spitz is off in the distance seeing this bonding moment and gets jealous, so he later starts a fight with Buck, leading to a showdown over who’s going to be the alpha male of the pack.

Because the trailers for “The Call of the Wild” make the movie look like it’s only about Buck and John, viewers who don’t know the book might be surprised to see how much of the movie is about Buck’s time in the dog-sled pack. It’s a pivotal part of the story in the novel and the film, because it’s the first time that Buck experiences being part of a dog pack. It’s also the first time he becomes in touch with his wild instincts that originate from the wolves who are ancestors of domesticated dogs. (When Buck uses his primal instincts, he sees a vision of a black wolf with glowing eyes )

So how did Buck end up with John? Buck and the sled team get a new owner named Hal, a greedy, insufferable fop who’s the most abusive owner yet for Buck. Hal wants the dog pack to take him, his sister Mercedes (played by Karen Gillan) and Mercedes’ passive husband Charles (played by Colin Goodell) on gold mining expeditions. Hal beats and starves the dogs into submission. If you love animals, this part of the film is hard to watch, even if you know the animals aren’t real.

Luckily, when John encounters the gold-digging trio and the mistreated dog pack, he rescues a severely malnourished and injured Buck. Hal leaves with the rest of the pack. (What happens to Hal and the dog pack in this movie is different from what happens to them in the original novel.) John takes Buck back to his small and sparse cabin in the woods and nurses the dog back to health.

John lives simply, and his gruff exterior masks a lot of emotional pain. He’s the type of prospector who isn’t looking for gold to get rich. At one point, he tells Buck that all a man needs is enough money “to buy groceries for life.” And it’s easy to see why he feels a strong connection to Buck, because Buck has also experienced a lot of pain.

During Buck’s time with John, Buck meets a pretty female hinterland wolf with white fur, and she introduces him to her pack, which readily accepts Buck, and he spends more and more time with them. (This is where the movie takes a sharp turn from reality, because in real life, a domesticated dog would be attacked and probably killed by a pack of wild wolves.)

It’s during this time that John (who talks to Buck like a human) reveals what happened in his past that’s made him a such a recluse: He had a son who died (it’s not mentioned how he died), and the grief over his son’s death led to him being estranged from his wife. It’s implied in the movie that John left his wife, they’re now divorced, and he let her keep their marital house and everything in it.

John is also a heavy drinker—and this is where the humanistic qualities of Buck are really shown in the movie—the dog scolds John for drinking too much, whether it’s by Buck hiding John’s flask of alcohol or making disapproving noises when he sees John drinking too much. Yes, Buck is not only an incredibly resourceful dog, apparently he’s also an addiction counselor/interventionist too.

Whenever there’s a movie about the wild, wild West, there also seems to be an obligatory scene with a bar fight. That moment comes when John is drinking at a bar and he gets sucker-punched by Hal, who’s angry at John because the dog pack ran off, thereby putting a severe damper on Hal’s gold-digging excursions in the rough terrain. Of course, Buck comes to the rescue when John is attacked. John fights back too, and Hal is thrown out of the bar. Do you think that’s the last we’ll see of Hal in this movie? Of course not.

The rest of the movie is about the bonding time that Buck and John spend together when John decides to take the adventure trip that he and his son had planned before his son died. “The Call of the Wild” is the first movie with live action for director Chris Sanders, who previously directed the animated films “How to Train Your Dragon,” “The Croods” and “Lilo & Stitch.” Fans of the “How to Train Your Dragon” series might see some similarities in the “man’s best friend” theme in both movies and how the animals take on human mannerisms.

There have been other “The Call of the Wild” movies, but this is the first to have this type of CGI animation for the animals. For the most part, it works well, even if the action sometimes look cartoonish because of what some of the things these animated animals do that real animals can’t do. However, this version of “The Call of the Wild” (whose screenplay was written by Michael Green) keeps the story’s message of resilience and friendship intact and treats it with respect. It’s a timeless message that will resonate even with changes in movie technology.

20th Century Studios released “The Call of the Wild” in U.S. cinemas on February 21, 2020.

UPDATE: Because of the widespread coronavirus-related closures of movie theaters worldwide, 20th Century Home Entertainment has moved up the digital release of “The Call of the Wild” to March 27, 2020.

Review: ‘Dolittle,’ starring Robert Downey Jr.

January 17, 2020

by Carla Hay

Robert Downey Jr.  and parrot Polynesia (voiced by Emma Thompson) in “Dolittle” (Photo courtesy of Universal Pictures)

“Dolittle”

Directed by Stephen Gaghan

Culture Representation: Set primarily in the United Kingdom, this dramatic adventure movie’s live-action characters are nearly all white; the voice actors portraying the animated animals are a racially mixed cast; and the social classes range from working-class to royalty.

Culture Clash: A reclusive doctor with the special power to talk to animals reluctantly goes on a journey to find a rare medical cure, and faces obstacles that include more than one villain.

Culture Audience: “Dolittle” will appeal primarily to fans of children-oriented entertainment who don’t mind if the visuals are much better than the storytelling.

Dab-Dab the duck (voiced by Octavia Spencer), polar bear Yoshi (voiced by John Cena), parrot Polynesia (voiced by Emma Thompson), Dr. John Dolittle (played by Robert Downey Jr.), ostrich Plimpton (voiced by Kumail Nanjiani), Tommy Stubbins (played by Harry Collett) and gorilla Chee-Chee (voiced by Rami Malek) in “Dolittle” (Photo courtesy of Universal Pictures)

It’s not really a good sign when a major-studio film headlined by an A-list movie star is released in January, the month that’s a notorious dumping ground for bad movies. Universal Pictures must have known that “Dolittle” was going to be a dud, even with star Robert Downey Jr. coming off his major hot streak in the blockbuster superhero “Avengers” and “Iron Man” movies. (“Avengers: Endgame,” Downey’s 2019 movie that was released before “Dolittle,” now holds the record as the world’s biggest box-office movie hit of all time, ending the 10-year reign at the top held by “Avatar.”) “Dolittle” isn’t a terrible film. It’s just a terribly generic film in an era when we’ve been bombarded with kids-oriented movies that have talking animals.

By making “Dolittle” an action-adventure film, “Dolittle” director Stephen Gaghan, who wrote the screenplay with Dan Gregor and Doug Mand, tried to do something different from previous “Dolittle” movies. The original 1967 “Dr. Dolittle” film, starring Rex Harrison and a cast of other Brits, was a musical adapted from Hugh Lofting’s “Dr. Dolittle” book series. The three “Dr. Dolittle” movies from 1998, 2000 and 2006 were slapstick American comedies—the first two starred Eddie Murphy as the title character, and a third film was an ill-conceived flop starring Kyla Pratt, who played Dolittle’s daughter in the first two Murphy-starring films.

Gaghan’s “Dolittle” goes back to the original United Kingdom location, during the mid-1800s era of a young Queen Victoria (played by Jessie Buckley), who has come down with a mysterious illness. During the film’s animated opening sequence, viewers see that veterinarian John Dolittle once led a happy life taking care of animals with his beloved wife Lily (played by Kasia Smutniak), who died tragically.

Fast forward seven years later, and Dr. Dolittle has become a cranky hermit who has neglected his hygiene (he’s so unkempt that a mouse has been living in his beard), as he lives with his animals on his estate that’s essentially an animal sanctuary. The filmmakers have made Dolittle a Welshman, so it might take a while for some viewers to getting used to hearing Downey speak in a Welsh accent that sounds a little too pretentious for a movie where most of his co-stars are animated talking animals. This is a kids’ movie, not Shakespeare.

Tommy Stubbins (played by Harry Collett), a boy from the small village of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh, is an orphaned misfit who lives with his aunt and uncle. Tommy loves animals, and is therefore uncomfortable when he’s forced to go hunting with his uncle. When Tommy accidentally shoots a squirrel while hunting, he decides to take the injured animal to the mysterious Dr. Dolittle, even though the doctor has a reputation for being a curmudgeon. Instead of being afraid of Dolittle’s menagerie of wild animals, Tommy is fascinated and finds out that he has a knack for communicating with animals too. Affected by Tommy’s presence, Dolittle cleans himself up, as he notices that Tommy sees him as a role model and possible mentor.

It isn’t long before Dolittle gets another visitor: Queen Victoria’s attendant Lady Rose (played Carmel Laniado), who arrives with orders to bring Dolittle to Buckingham Palace to give medical aid to the queen. Dolittle has a big incentive to save the queen’s life, because his property has been loaned to him by the queen, and if she dies, he will lose the property.

While at the palace, Dolittle has an awkward reunion with a former school rival: royal physician Dr. Blair Müdfly (played by Michael Sheen), who is jealous of Dolittle’s talent and acclaim. Müdfly is such an over-the-top villain that he practically twirls his moustache and gnashes his teeth. And there’s another antagonist in the story: the ambitious Lord Thomas Badgley (played by Jim Broadbent), who will inherit the throne if Queen Victoria dies. (At this point in her life, Victoria is not married and has no children.)

Dolittle determines that the best cure for the queen’s life-threatening illness is fruit from the Eden Tree on Eden Tree Island, because this fruit is said to have magical powers. (How biblical.) Tommy has essentially decided that he doesn’t really want to go home, so he tags along on Dolittle’s voyage, with Dolittle’s numerous animals in tow as they set sail on a ship called the Water Lily.

Now, about the animals. The problem with “Dolittle” is that there are too many of them in this film. If you’re someone with a short attention span, good luck trying to keep track of all the talking animals. The “Madagascar” movies (another animated series with a variety of wild animals that talk) worked so well because the animals were in a relatively small group and their personalities were so distinct. In “Dolittle,” the personalities of most of the animals tend to blend together in a crowded mush, with the notable exception of the parrot Polynesia (voiced by Emma Thompson), a dutifully efficient assistant/caretaker with a whip-smart attitude. Polynesia holds a special place in Dolittle’s heart because the parrot used to be owned by Dolittle’s late wife Lily.

The other animals in this mixed-bag menagerie are Chee-Chee (voiced by Rami Malek), an insecure gorilla; Dab-Dab (voiced by Octavia Spencer), a maternal, scatterbrained American Pekin duck; Plimpton, a nervous osctrich (voiced by Kumail Nanjiani); Yoshi (voiced by John Cena), a polar bear who hates the cold, loves adventure, and often bickers with Plimpton; Betsy (voiced by Selena Gomez), a kind giraffe; Kevin (voiced by Crag Robinson), the injured squirrel that was accidentally shot by Tommy and who has a cheeky sense of humor; Tutu (voiced by Marion Cotillard), a fearless fox with leadership qualities; and Mini (voiced by Nick A. Fisher), a baby sugar glider that’s constantly curious.

Meanwhile, other talking animals include brainy dog Jip (voiced by Tom Holland), a long-haired Lurcher tasked with guarding the queen; Humphrey (voiced by Tim Treloar), a whale that helps navigate the Water Lily; James (voiced by Jason Mantzoukas), a nervous dragonfly; Barry (voiced by Ralph Fiennes), a Bengal tiger with mommy issues and a grudge against Dolittle; Don Carpenterino (voiced by David Sheinkopf), the leader of an ant colony; Army Ant (voiced by Matthew Wolfe), Don’s sidekick; and Dragon (voiced by Frances de la Tour), guardian of the Eden Tree.

As for other human characters, there’s also Pirate King Rassouli (played by Antonio Banderas), who lives on Monteverde Island, one of the stops along the way to Eden Tree Island. Banderas hams it up as yet another adversary to Dolittle and his crew. Large ensembles can work for well-written, live-action films geared to adults. But when it’s a mostly animated film geared to kids, the movie can come across as too cluttered for its own good.

“Dolittle” certainly has an impressive cast of acting talent. It’s too bad that so many of the characters are bland. Furthermore, Chee-Chee (the gorilla that’s a visual standout) is a missed opportunity, since the character was miscast for its voice. Malek sounds more like the minature “Frozen” snowman Olaf than a massive gorilla. The Chee-Chee character needed an actor with a deeper voice to better reflect the gorilla’s intimidating physical presence. Former wrestling champ Cena, who’s the voice of Yoshi the polar bear, would have been better in the role of Chee-Chee.

Although the characters in this movie are very underdeveloped, the compelling visual effects (overseen by visual effects supervisors Nicolas Aithadi and John Dykstra) are the most entertaining aspect of the film. Young children who are dazzled by visuals should enjoy “Dolittle” for the movie’s colorful ambiance, even if they won’t remember most of the movie’s animal characters weeks after seeing this film. (Don’t expect there to be a high demand for “Dolittle” toys.) More mature viewers might get easily bored with this movie, because it wallows in a lot of mediocrity that wastes this talented cast.

Simply put: “Dolittle” is not the kind of movie that people looking for high-quality entertainment will rush to see multiple times while it’s in theaters. We all know how this movie is going to end anyway.

Universal Pictures released “Dolittle” in U.S. cinemas on January 17, 2020.

 

 

 

Review: ‘Weathering With You,’ an animated romance from Japan

January 15, 2020

by Carla Hay

"Weathering With You"
“Weathering With You” (Photo courtesy of GKIDS)

“Weathering With You”

Directed by Makoto Shinkai

Available in the original Japanese version (with English subtitles) or in a dubbed English-language version.

Culture Representation: This Japanese animated fantasy film takes place primarily in Tokyo, with teenagers as the lead characters and adults as supporting characters.

Culture Clash: In this alternate and supernatural world, underage teenagers who live on their own try to find their identities and independence, while sometimes clashing with adults who might try to control or exploit them.

Culture Audience: “Weathering With You” is a family-friendly film that will appeal mostly to fans of Japanese anime and romantic animated films.

“Weathering With You” (Photo courtesy of GKIDS)

“Weathering With You” is an old-fashioned love story wrapped up in a modern setting with futuristic and sci-fi/supernatural elements. This charming animated movie (written and directed by Makoto Shinkai) was Japan’s official 2019 entry for the Best International Feature Film category for the Academy Awards—and it’s almost the polar opposite from Japan’s 2018 entry: the bleak drama “Shoplifters,” which was about a group of thieves from different generations who live together. Interestingly, both movies do have something in common. The central characters are financially unstable people who are living outside the margins of regular society and who find themselves with a surrogate family.

In “Weathering With You,” viewers first see 16-year-old runaway Hokada Morishima on a ship going to Tokyo, where he wants to escape from his remote island home. While on the ship, and after hearing that a major rainstorm is headed that way, Hokada foolishly goes outside during the storm and almost gets swept overboard. He’s saved by a young man, and as a thank you, Hokada buys dinner for the stranger when they arrive in Tokyo. It’s clear from this scene that Hokada is an impulsive risk-taker, but he also has a kind heart.

Because Hokada is underage and doesn’t have any proper ID, it’s difficult for him to find a job. While figuring out where he’s going to get his next meal, a teenage girl who works at a local café takes pity on him and gives him a free hamburger. Hokada eventually runs out of money, and he ends up homeless and living on the street, where he finds a gun in a paper bag and keeps the weapon. That gun will get him into trouble later in the story. Meanwhile, Tokyo and other parts of Japan are experiencing torrential rainstorms.

As luck would have it, Hokada lands a job interview, based on going to an address of a business card he’s found. It’s a small magazine company run by a mysterious widower in his 30s named Keisuke “Kei” Suga, who works out of his cluttered home with his young female assistant named Natsumi. Keisuke and Natsumi report supernatural news stories, and the latest trends they’re chasing have to do with unusual weather-related events. Hokada is hired on the spot to be an assistant/housekeeper. His salary is very low, but he gets a free place to live and free meals as part of his employment.

Shortly after getting the job, Hokada sees the girl from the café being manhandled on the street by a sleazy local club owner, who’s pressuring her to work for him. (It’s implied in the movie but not said out loud that he owns a strip club.) As the club owner and a henchman try to force the girl into the club, and she resists, Hokada intervenes and is punched in the face by the club owner. Hokada then pulls out the gun and shoots it in the air, giving him and the girl a way to escape.

The girl’s name is Hina Amano, and she says she’s 17 and soon about to turn 18. As a thank you for rescuing her, Hina invites Hokada over to her place and makes him lunch. It’s during their lunch date that they both find out that they have something in common: They are living on their own without parental supervision. Hokada confesses that he ran away from home because he thinks living with his parents is too stifling. Hina lives with her younger brother Nagisa (nicknamed Nagi), and she says that the mother who raised them died about a year ago. (Somehow, Hina and Nagisa, who don’t seem to have any other living relatives, have avoided going into foster care.)

Hina also has another big secret that she reveals to Hokada: She’s a “sunshine girl”—a rare “weather maiden” who has the ability to make it stop raining and bring the sun out, simply by praying. Because Hina has recently quit her job, and Hokada wants to supplement his measly income, they both decide to go into business together by offering her weather-control services to the public. They start a website together, and almost immediately, their business becomes a successes, with Nagisa often tagging along when they go to different locations to fulfill weather-changing requests.

But their success comes at a price: According to folklore, the more a sunshine girl uses her weather-changing abilities, the more her body begins to transform from flesh into spirit, until she is supposed to disappear forever into the spirit world. It couldn’t come at a worse time, since Hokada and Hina are starting to fall in love.

Complicating matters, the police (led by the stern Detective Takei) are on the hunt for Hokada, since his parents have reported him missing, and he was caught on surveillance video using the loaded gun in the street fight where he rescued Hina. Meanwhile, Keisuke (who’s depressed and has a drinking problem) has secrets of his own about his family that end up affecting his relationship with Hokada.

If you’ve seen Studio Ghibli films, then you’ll probably know what to expect for this movie’s animation (from production companies CoMix Wave Films and Story Inc.), which has an unfussy but expressive animation style that’s very similar to Studio Ghibli films. The voices of the “Weathering With You” characters are portrayed by different actors, depending on which version of “Weathering With You” that you see. The original Japanese version (with English subtitles) has Kotaro Daigo as Hokada, Nani Mori as Hina, Shun Oguri as Keisuke, Tsubasa Honda as Natsumi, Sakura Kiryu as Nagisa and Yûki Kaji as Detective Takei. There’s also a U.S. version, with the dialogue dubbed in English, that has Brandon Engman as Hokada, Ashley Boettcher as Hina, Lee Pace as Keisuke, Alison Brie as Natsumi, Emeka Guindo as Nagisa, Riz Ahmed as Detective Takei.

“Weathering With You” won’t be considered a major Oscar-winning Japanese animation classic, such as director Hayao Miyazaki’s “Spirited Away,” but “Weathering With You” is still a better-than-average modern animated film. Although “Weathering With You” includes serious social issues about homelessness and the hazards of messing with the environment, ultimately this is a sweetly sentimental film where the biggest messages are about taking life-changing risks for true love.

GKIDS released “Weathering With You” for special sneak-preview screenings in select U.S. cinemas on January 15 and January 16, 2020. “Weathering With You” arrived in wider release in U.S. cinemas on January 17, 2020. The movie was originally released in Japan in 2019.

2019 New York Comic Con: Anime Fest returns for second consecutive year, relocates to Hudson Mercantile

July 15, 2019

by Carla Hay

(Image courtesy of Anime Fest)

For the second year in a row, New York Comic Con has partnered with Anime Expo to create Anime Fest, which will take place on the same days as New York Comic Con 2019 in New York City: October 3 to October 6. Anime Fest is a separate event that will be held at Hudson Mercantile, a change in venue from the 2018 Anime Expo, which was held at Pier 94. New York Comic Con takes place at various locations in New York City, but the main hub is at Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. The good news is that Hudson Mercantile is much closer to the Javits Convention Center than Pier 94.

New York Comic Con badge purchases are not required to attend Anime Fest, and vice versa, but separate tickets are required for most Anime Fest offerings. However, the first floor of Hudson Mercantile will be  Anime Fest headquarters, which will be New York Comic Con badge holders and Anime Fest ticket holders alike. According to Anime Fest, this community hub will have “interactive and immersive experiences and opportunities to connect with other fans.”

Panels announced so far for Anime Fest 2019 include those featuring voice actor Charlet Chung (“Overwatch); Veronica Taylor (“Pokémon,” “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”); and Christopher Sabat and Sean Schemmel  (“Dragon Ball Z”).

 

2019 Daytime Emmy Awards: ‘The Young and the Restless,’ ‘General Hospital’ win big

March 20, 2019

by Carla Hay

Daytime Emmy Awards

 

“The Young and the Restless” (Photo by Art Streiber/CBS)

With seven prizes,  including Outstanding Drama Series, CBS’s “The Young and the Restless,” was a top winner for the 46th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards, which were presented at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in California on May 5, 2019. The Daytime Creative Arts Emmy Awards (for mostly technical categories) took place at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium on May 3, 2019. The Daytime Emmys website had a livestream of the ceremony, which was hosted by Mario Lopez and Sheryl Underwood.

ABC’s “General Hospital” was also a big winner, taking six awards. Most of the prizes were in the Drama Series categories for actors and actresses, with “General Hospital’s” Daytime Emmys this year going to Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Maurice Benard); Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (Max Gail); Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Vernee Watson); Outstanding Younger Actress in a Drama Series (Hayley Erin); and Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series (Patricia Bethune).

For digital series, Amazon Prime Video’s “After Forever” won the most Daytime Emmys, with a total of five, including Outstanding Daytime Digital Series.

Other winners of Daytime Emmys this year were “CBS Sunday Morning” for Outstanding Morning Program; “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” for Outstanding Talk Show Entertainment; “Rachael Ray” for Outstanding Talk Show Informative; “Family Feud” for Outstanding Game Show; and “Valerie’s Home Cooking” for Outstanding Culinary Show.

In addition, Judge Judy Sheindlin and Chef Jacques Pepin each received a Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Daytime Emmy Awards are presented to individuals and programs broadcast in the United States from 2 a.m. to 6 p.m. during the previous calendar year.

The 46th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards was a presentation of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Both of this year’s shows were led by executive producer David Michaels (NATAS senior VP of daytime) and executive producer David Parks of Ignition Entertainment.

Here is the complete list of winners and nominees for the 2019 Daytime Emmy Awards:

*=winner

Outstanding Drama Series

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)
Days of Our Lives (NBC)
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)*

Outstanding Digital Daytime Drama Series

After Forever Amazon Studios)*
The Bay: The Series (Amazon Studios)
Giants (YouTube Premium)
The New 30 (YouTube TV)
Youth & Consequences (YouTube Premium)

Outstanding Culinary Program

A Chef’s Life (PBS)
Barefoot Contessa: Cook Like a Pro (Food Network)
Cook’s Country (PBS)
Eat. Race. Win. (Amazon Prime Video)
Giada Entertains (Food Network)
Lidia’s Kitchen (PBS)
Valerie’s Home Cooking (Food Network)*

Outstanding Game Show

Family Feud (SYNDICATED)*
Jeopardy! (SYNDICATED)
Let’s Make a Deal (CBS)
The Price Is Right (CBS)
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (SYNDICATED)

Outstanding Legal/Courtroom Program

Couples Court with the Cutlers (SYNDICATED)
Judge Judy (SYNDICATED)
Judge Mathis (SYNDICATED)
Lauren Lake’s Paternity Court (SYNDICATED)*
The People’s Court (SYNDICATED)

Outstanding Lifestyle Program

Ask This Old House (PBS)*
George to the Rescue (NBC)
Home Made Simple with Laila Ali (OWN)
Naturally, Danny Seo (NBC)
This Old House (PBS)

Outstanding Travel and Adventure Program

Born to Explore with Richard Wiese (PBS)
F2 Finding Football (YouTube Premium)
Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild (SYNDICATED)
Ocean Treks with Jeff Corwin (SYNDICATED)
Rock the Park (SYNDICATED)
Samantha Brown’s Places to Love (PBS)*

Outstanding Morning Program

CBS Sunday Morning (CBS)*
CBS This Morning (CBS)
Good Morning America (ABC)
Today Show (NBC)

Outstanding Morning Program in Spanish

Café CNN (CNN en Español*)
Despierta America (Univision)*
Nuestro Mundo (CNN en Español)
Un Nuevo Dia (Telemundo)

Outstanding Talk Show Informative

Access Live (SYNDICATED)
The Dr. Oz Show (SYNDICATED)
Rachael Ray (SYNDICATED)*
Red Table Talk (Facebook Watch)
Today Show With Kathie Lee & Hoda (NBC)

Outstanding Talk Show Entertainment

The Ellen DeGeneres Show (SYNDICATED)*
A Little Help With Carol Burnett (Netflix)
The Real (SYNDICATED)
The Talk (CBS)
The View (ABC)

Outstanding Entertainment Program in Spanish

Destinos (CNN en Español)
Dr. Juan (Univision)
El Gordo y la Flaca (Univision)
Six Dreams (Amazon Prime Video)*
Suelta la sopa (Telemundo)

Outstanding Entertainment News Program

Access (SYNDICATED)
DailyMailTV (SYNDICATED)*
Entertainment Tonight (CBS)
Extra (SYNDICATED)
Inside Edition (CBS)

Outstanding Special Class Series

Close Up With The Hollywood Reporter (SundanceTV)
Lucky Dog with Brandon McMillan (CBS)
Mysteries & Scandals (Oxygen)
To Life: How Israeli Volunteers Are Changing the World (Freeform)
Variety Studio: Actors on Actors (PBS)*
Working in the Theatre (AmericanTheatreWing.org)

Outstanding Special Class Special

The 91st Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade (NBC)
Light in the Water (Logo TV)
A Long Road to Freedom: The Advocate Celebrates 50 Years (Here TV)
Quiet Heroes (Logo TV)*
Super Soul Sunday: Oprah’s Book Club: Freedom After 30 Years on Death Row (OWN)

Outstanding Special Class – Short Format Daytime Program

Blank Wall Overhaul (Bluprint)
Food Interrupted (Facebook Watch)
Momsplaining (Ellen Digital Network)
Treatment Box “Opioids” (Truth)*
Watchtower (YouTube.com)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

Jacqueline MacInnes Wood, as Steffy Forrester
The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)*

Marci Miller, as Abigail Deveraux DiMera
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Heather Tom, as Katie Logan
The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)

Maura West, as Ava Jerome
General Hospital (ABC)

Laura Wright, as Carly Corinthos
General Hospital (ABC)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Maurice Benard, as Sonny Corinthos*
General Hospital (ABC)

Peter Bergman, as Jack Abbott
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Tyler Christopher, as Stefan DiMera
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Billy Flynn, as Chad DiMera
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Jon Lindstrom, as Ryan/Kevin Collns
General Hospital (ABC)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Kassie DePaiva, as Eve Donovan
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Linsey Godfrey, as Sarah Horton
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Martha Madison, as Belle Black
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Beth Maitland, as Traci Abbott
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Mishael Morgan, as Hilary Curtis
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Vernee Watson*
General Hospital (ABC)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Max Gail, as Mike Corbin*
General Hospital (ABC)

Bryton James, as Devon Hamilton
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Eric Martsolf, as Brady Black
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Greg Rikaart, as Kevin Fisher
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Dominic Zamprogna, as Dante Falconeri
General Hospital (ABC)

Outstanding Younger Actress in a Drama Series

Hayley Erin, as Kiki Jerome*
General Hospital (ABC)

Olivia Rose Keegan, as Claire Brady
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Victoria Konefal, as Ciara Brady
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Chloe Lanier, as Nelle Benson
General Hospital (ABC)

Eden McCoy, as Josslyn Jacks
General Hospital (ABC)

Outstanding Younger Actor in a Drama Series

Lucas Adams, as Tripp Dalton
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

William Lipton, as Cameron Webber
General Hospital (ABC)

Kyler Pettis, as Theo Carver*
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Garren Stitt, as Oscar Nero
General Hospital (ABC)

Zach Tinker, as Fenmore Baldwin
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series

Philip Anthony-Rodriguez, as Miguel Garcia
Days of Our Lives (CBS)

Patricia Bethune, as Nurse Mary Pat*
General Hospital (ABC)

Wayne Brady, as Dr. Reese Buckingham
The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)

Kate Mansi, as Abigail Deveraux
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Thaao Penghlis, as Andre DiMera
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Digital Daytime Drama Series

Jade Harlow, as Lianna Ramos
The Bay The Series (Amazon Prime Video)

Vanessa Kelly, as Journee*
Giants (YouTube.com)

Liana Liberto, as McKenna Brady
Light as a Feather (Hulu)

Shanti Lowry, as Yolanda Rodriguez
Bronx SIU, UMC (Amazon Prime Video)

Liz Vasset, as Dr. Gillian Hunt
Riley Parra (Tello Films)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Digital Daytime Drama Series

Mitchell Anderson, as Jason Addams
After Forever, Amazon Prime Video

Kristos Andrews, as Pete Garrett
The Bay The Series (Amazon Prime Video)

Kevin Spirtas, as Brian Stone*
After Forever (Amazon Prime Video)

Brian White, as Jimmy Blue
Bronx SIU, UMC (Amazon Prime Video)

Wayne Wilcox, as Ray
Only Children (Vimeo.com)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Digital Daytime Drama Series

Crystal Lee Brown, as Tamera
Giants (YouTube.com)

Erin Cherry, as Brenda*
After Forever (Amazon Prime Video)

Cady Huffman, as Lisa
After Forever (Amazon Prime Video)

Carolyn Ratteray, as Caitline Priest
Riley Parra (Tello Films)

Briann Tju, as Alex Portnoy
Light as a Feather (Hulu)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Digital Daytime Drama Series

Ameer Baraka, as Darius
Bronx SIU, UMC (Amazon Prime Video)

Brandon Beemer, as Evan Blackwell
The Bay The Series (Amazon Prime Video)

Wil Lash, as Scott Taylor
Anacostia (YouTube.com)

Sean Samuels, as Ade
Giants (YouTube.com)

Terrence Terrell, as Kwasi Asamoah*
Giants (YouTube.com)

Outstanding Guest Performer in a Digital Daytime Drama Series

Sean Patrick Flanery, as Ty Garrett*
The Bay The Series (Amazon Prime Video)

Anita Gillette, as Frannie
After Forever (Amazon Prime Video)

Lou Diamond Phillips, as Martin
Conversations in L.A. (Amazon Prime Video)

J. August Richards, as Andrew Prescott
Giants (YouTube.com)

Kelsey Scott, as Sadiyah Siobahn
Giants (YouTube.com)

Outstanding Interactive Media Enhancement to a Daytime Program or Series

92nd Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade (NBC)
Ask the StoryBots (Netflix)
Crow: The Legend (Boabab Studios)*
Esme & Roy (HBO Family)
Space Explorers (Felix & Paul Studios)

Outstanding Daytime Promotional Announcement – Topical

American Ninja Warrior Junior (Universal Kids)
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (SYNDICATED)
Lifetime’s 24th annual Stop Breast Cancer for Life Campaign (Lifetime
The Star Wars Show (YouTube.com)*
The View (ABC)

Outstanding Daytime Promotional Announcement Brand Image Campaign – Network or Program

Black History Month (Nickelodeon)*
Nickelodeon: 2017 Black History Month Campaign (Nickelodeon)
DreamWorks Spirit Riding Free (Netflix)
Nickelodeon: Pride Month (Nickelodeon)
Nickelodeon: Women’s History Month Campaign (Nickelodeon)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Preschool Children’s Series

The Big Fun Crafty Show (Universal Kids)
Dino Dana (Amazon Prime Video)
Miss Persona (YouTube.com)
Sesame Street (HBO)*
Snug’s House (Universal Kids)

Outstanding Short Format Children’s Program

Canticos (Nickelodeon)
Nick Jr. Bloc Party: Quest for the Golden Cube (Nickelodeon)
Nick Jr. Color Song: RED (Nickelodeon)*
Sesame Street (HBO)

Outstanding Children’s or Family Viewing Series

American Ninja Warrior Junior (Universal Kids)
Chicken Soup for the Soul’s Hidden Heroes (The CW)
Odd Squad (PBS)*
Top Chef Junior (Universal Kids)
The Who Was? Show (Netflix)

Outstanding Original Song in a Children’s or Animated Program

“For One and All”
Disney Sofia the First (Disney Junior)

“Elena of Avalor”
Fallin’ Like a Rock (Disney Junior)

“Making a World With My Friend”
Peg + Cat (PBS)

“The Thrill of Invention”
Peg + Cat (PBS)

“You’re All Number One Tonight!”
Peg + Cat (PBS)

Outstanding Education or Informational Series

Mind Field (YouTube Premium)
SciGirls (PBS)
Weird But True (National Geographic Kids)*
The Wildlife Docs (ABC)
Xploration Outer Space (SYNDICATED)

Outstanding Preschool Children’s Animated Series

Ask the StoryBots (Netflix)
Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood (PBS)*
Elena of Avalor (Disney Junior)
Esme & Roy (HBO Family)
Tumble Leaf (Amazon Prime Video)

Outstanding Children’s Animated Series

Disney Mickey Mouse (Disney Channel)
Hilda (Netflix)
The Loud House (Nickelodeon)*
Rise of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Nickelodeon)
Welcome to the Wayne (Nickelodeon)

Outstanding Special Class Animated Program

Crow: The Legend (Baobab Studios)
DuckTales: The Shadow War! (Disney Channel)
Paw Patrol: Mighty Pups (Nickelodeon)
Tumble Leaf Halloween Special (Amazon Prime Video)
Watership Down (Netflix)

Outstanding Performer in a Children’s, Family Viewing or Special Class Program

Bill Cobbs, as Mr. Hendrickson
Dino Dana (Amazon Prime Video)

Bret Green, as Preston Wainwright
The Inspectors (CBS)

Michela Luci, as Dana
Dino Dana (Amazon Prime Video)

Edward Norton, as Gary the Electronics Salesman
Ask the StoryBots (Netflix)

Kimberly Persona, as Miss Persona
Miss Persona (YouTube.com)

Hanna VandenBygaart, as Vera
ReBoot: The Guardian Code (Netflix)

Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program

Jay Baruchel, as Hiccup*
Dragons: Race to the Edge (Netflix)

Bob Bergen, as Porky Pig
Wabbit – A Looney Tunes Production (Cartoon Network)

Chris Diamantopoulos, as Mickey Mouse
Disney Mickey Mouse (Disney Channel)

Mark Hamill, as Old Jir, Caz
Kulipari: Dream Walker (Netflix)

Marieve Herington, as Tilly Green
Big City Greens (Disney Channel)

Ruth Negga, as Mother
Angela’s Christmas (Netflix)

Outstanding Performer in a Preschool Animated Program

Eric Bauza, as Fozzie Bear, Bunsen Honeydew, Mr. Statler
Muppet Babies (Disney Junior)

Steve Buscemi, as Saloso
Elena of Avalor (Disney Junior)

Devan Cohen, as Daniel Tiger
Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood (PBS)

Ben Diskin, as Gonzo, Rizzo
Muppet Babies (Disney Junior)

Olivia Manning, as Dazzle
Butterbean’s Café (Nickelodeon)

Outstanding Culinary Host

Valerie Bertinelli, Host*
Valerie’s Home Cooking (Food Network)

Giada De Laurentiis, Host
Giada Entertains (Food Network)

Catherine Fulvio, Host
A Taste of Ireland: Ballyknocken Cookery School (Recipe TV)

Pati Jinich, Host
Pati’s Mexican Table (PBS)

Molly Yeh, Host
Girl Meets Farm (Food Network)

Outstanding Daytime Talent in a Spanish Language Program

Guillermo Arduino, Senior Correspondent
Encuentro (CNN en Español)

Raul De Molina, Host
El Gordo y la Flaca (Univision)

Raul De Molina, Co-Host
El Gordo y la Flaca (Univision)

Elizabeth Hernandez Curiel, Correspondent
El Gordo y la Flaca (Univision)

Gabriela Natale, Host
SuperLatina with Gaby Natale (VME TV)

Alejandra Oraa, Host*
Destinos (CNN en Español)

Outstanding Game Show Host

Wayne Brady, Host
Let’s Make a Deal (CBS)

Chris Harrison, Host
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (SYNDICATED)

John Michael Higgins, Host
America Says (Game Show Network)

Pat Sajak, Host
Wheel of Fortune (SYNDICATED)

Alex Trebek, Host*
Jeopardy! (SYNDICATED)

Outstanding Host in a Lifestyle, Children’s or Special Class Program

Monique Coleman
Gimme Mo (Discovery)

Mo Rocca
The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation (CBS )

Jeff Corwin
Ocean Treks With Jeff Corwin (SYNDICATED)

Samantha Brown
Samantha Brown’s Places to Love (PBS)

Rob Strasberg, Treger Strasberg
Welcome Home (The CW)

Outstanding Informative Talk Show Host

Hoda Kotb, Kathie Lee Gifford, Hosts*
Today Show With Kathie Lee & Hoda (NBC)

Steve Harvey, Host
STEVE (SYNDICATED)

Dr. Mehmet Oz, Host
The Dr. Oz Show (SYNDICATED)

Kellie Pickler, Ben Aaron, Hosts
Pickler and Ben (SYNDICATED)

Rachael Ray, Host
Rachael Ray (SYNDICATED)

Outstanding Entertainment Talk Show Host

Kelly Ripa, Ryan Seacrest, Hosts*
Live with Kelly and Ryan (SYNDICATED)

Adrienne Houghton, Loni Love, Jeannie Mai, Tamera Mowry-Housley, Co-Hosts
The Real (SYNDICATED)

Julie Chen, Sara Gilbert, Sharon Osbourne, Sheryl Underwood, Aisha Tyler, Hosts
The Talk (CBS)

Whoopi Goldberg, Joy Behar, Sara Haines, Sunny Hostin, Meghan McCain, Abby Huntsman, Co-Hosts
The View (ABC)

Wendy Williams, Host
The Wendy Williams Show (SYNDICATED)

Outstanding Drama Series Writing Team

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)
Days of Our Lives (NBC)
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)*

Outstanding Drama Series Directing Team

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)
Days of Our Lives (NBC)
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Casting for a Drama Series

Days of Our Lives (NBC)*
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Art Direction/Set Decoration/Scenic Design for a Drama Series
Days of Our Lives (NBC)
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)*

Outstanding Lighting Direction for a Drama Series

Days of Our Lives (NBC)
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)*

Outstanding Drama Series Technical Team

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)*
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Multiple Camera Editing for a Drama Series

Days of Our Lives (NBC)
General Hospital (ABC)*
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Live and Direct to Tape Sound Mixing for a Drama Series

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)*

Outstanding Music Direction and Composition for a Drama Series

Days of Our Lives (NBC)*
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Original Song – Drama

“You’re the One”*
The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)

“Goodbye”
Days of Our Lives (NBC)

“More Love”
Giants (YouTube.com)

“Beat of Your Heart”
Giants (YouTube.com)

“How Could a Life Feel So True”
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Costume Design for a Drama Series

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)
Days of Our Lives (NBC)
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)*

Outstanding Hairstyling for a Drama Series

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)
Days of Our Lives (NBC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)*

Outstanding Makeup for a Drama Series

The Bold and the Beautiful (CBS)
Days of Our Lives (NBC)*
General Hospital (ABC)
The Young and the Restless (CBS)

Outstanding Writing in a Digital Drama Series

After Forever (Amazon Prime Video)*
The Bay The Series (Amazon Prime Video)
Conversations in L.A. (Amazon Prime Video)
Giants (YouTube.com)
Light as a Feather (Hulu)

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Animation – Winners

Kal Athannassov, Character Designer Crow: The Legend Baobab Studios*

Alan Bodner, Production Designer Rapunzel’s Tangled Adventures Disney Channel*

Cody Gramstad, Production Designer Crow: The Legend Baobab Studios*

Yizhou Li, Character Animator Tumble Leaf Amazon Prime Video*

Brian Woods, Background Designer Rapunzel’s Tangled Adventures Disney Channel*

Kevin Wotton, Storyboard Artist Spirit Riding Free Netflix*

Outstanding Casting for an Animated Series or Special

Duck Tales (Disney Channel)
Elena of Avalor (Disney Junior)*
Esme & Roy (HBO Family)
Muppet Babies (Disney Junior)
Rapunzel’s Tangled Adventure (Disney Channel)
She-Ra and the Princesses of Power (Netflix)

Outstanding Writing in a Preschool Animated Program

Ask the StoryBots (Netflix)*
Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood (PBS)
Disney Doc McStuffins (Disney Junior)
Fancy Nancy (Disney Junior)
Peg+Cat (PBS)

Outstanding Writing in an Animated Program

Angela’s Christmas (Netflix)
Hilda (Netflix)
The Loud House (Nickelodeon)
Tales of Arcadia: Trollhunters (Netflix)
Wild Kratts (PBS)

Outstanding Writing in a Children’s, Preschool Children’s, Family Viewing Program

Dino Dana (Amazon Prime Video)
Odd Squad (PBS)*
Odd Squad: World Turned Odd (PBS)
Sesame Street (HBO)
The Who Was? Show (Netflix)

Outstanding Writing Special Class

The 2018 Rose Parade Hosted by Cord & Tish (Amazon Prime Video)
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (SYNDICATED)*
The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation (CBS)
The Royal Wedding Live With Cord & Tish (HBO)
To Life: How Israeli Volunteers Are Changing the World (Freeform)

Outstanding Directing in a Digital Drama Series

After Forever (Amazon Prime Video)*
The Bay The Series (Amazon Prime Video)
Conversations in L.A. (Amazon Prime Video)
Giants (YouTube.com)
Light as a Feather (Hulu)

Outstanding Directing in an Animated Program

The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle (Amazon Prime Video)
Crow: The Legend (Baobab Studios)*
Hilda Netflix
Tales of Arcadia: Trollhunters (Netflix)
Watership Down (Netflix)

Outstanding Directing in a Preschool Animated Program

Ask the StoryBots (Netflix)*
Fancy Nancy (Disney Junior)
Nella the Princess Knight (Nickelodeon)
Peg+Cat (PBS)
Tumble Leaf (Amazon Prime Video)

Outstanding Directing in a Children’s, Preschool Children’s or Family Viewing Program

Dino Ana (Amazon Prime Video)
Free Rein (Netflix)
Mech X-4 (DisneyXD)
Odd Squad (PBS)*

Outstanding Directing in a Single Camera Lifestyle/Culinary/Travel or Educational and Informational Program

1st Look (NBC)*
Joseph Rosendo’s Travelscope (PBS)
The Pioneer Woman (Food Network)
Samantha Brown’s Places to Love (PBS)
Weird But True! (National Geographic Kids)

Outstanding Directing in  a Multi Camera Lifestyle/Culinary or Educational and Informational Program

America’s Test Kitchen (PBS)
Cook’s Country (PBS)
Home & Family (Hallmark Channel)
The Kitchen (Food Network)*
Milk Street (PBS)

Outstanding Educational and Informational Program

Furze World Wonders (YouTube Premium)
The Kitchen (Food Network)
Milk Street (PBS*)
Nick Stellino Storyteller in the Kitchen (PBS)
Trisha’s Southern Kitchen (Food Network)

Outstanding Directing in a Talk Show, Entertainment News or Morning Program

The Ellen DeGeneres Show (SYNDICATED)*
A Little Help With Carol Burnett (Netflix)
The Real (SYNDICATED)
The Talk (CBS)
The View (ABC)

Outstanding Directing in a Game Show

Family Feud (SYNDICATED)*
Jeopardy! (SYNDICATED)
Let’s Make a Deal (CBS)
The Price Is Right (CBS)
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (SYNDICATED)

Outstanding Directing Special Class

The Gymkhana Files (Amazon Prime Video)
Team United – Behind the Scenes: Superherooes (YouTube.com)
Time for Ilhan (Fuse)*
Watchtower (YouTube.com)
Working in the Theater (AmericanTheatreWing.org)

Outstanding Art Direction/Set Decoration/Scenic Design

Dino Dana (Amazon Prime Video)
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (SYNDICATED)
Prince of Peoria (Netflix)
The Talk (CBS)*
Tomorrow’s World Today (Science Channel)

Outstanding Main Title and Graphic Design for a Live Action Program

DailyMailTV (SYNDICATED)
Disney Parks Magical Christmas Day Parade (ABC)
Prince of Peoria (Netflix)
Six Dreams (Amazon Prime Video)*
The Who Was? Show (Netflix)
Outstanding Main Title and Graphic Design for an Animated Program

The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle (Amazon Prime Video)
Hilda (Netflix)*
Little Big Awesome (Amazon Prime Video)
Tales of Arcadia: 3Below (Netflix)
Watership Down (Netflix)

Outstanding Lighting Direction

Dino Dana (Amazon Prime Video)
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (SYNDICATED)
The Inspectors (CBS)*
Rachael Ray (SYNDICATED)
The Talk (CBS)

Outstanding Technical Team

American Ninja Warrior Junior (Universal Kids)
CBS This Morning
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (SYNDICATED)
Jeopardy! (SYNDICATED)
The Price Is Right (CBS)*
Sesame Street (HBO)

Outstanding Cinematography

The Gymkhana Files (Amazon Prime Video)
Mech-X4 (DisneyXD)
The New Legends of Monkey (Netflix)
Tumble Leaf (Amazon Prime Video)*

Outstanding Single Camera Editing

1st Look (NBC)
Eat. Race. Win. (Amazon Prime Video)*
Giada on the Beach (Food Network)
The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation (CBS)
The Who Was? Show (Netflix)

Outstanding Multiple Camera Editing

Disney Parks Magical Christmas Day Parade (ABC)
Let’s Make a Deal (CBS)
The Price Is Right (CBS)
Sesame Street (HBO)*
Top Chef Junior (Universal Kids)

Outstanding Sound Mixing

Annedroids (Amazon Prime Video)
The Gymkhana Files (Amazon Prime Video)
The New Legends of Monkey (Netflix)
ReBoot: The Guardian Code (Netflix)
Sesame Street (HBO)*
Six Dreams (Amazon Prime Video)

Outstanding Sound Mixing in an Animated Program

Angela’s Christmas (Netflix)
Crow: The Legend (Baobab Studios)
Tales of Arcadia: 3Below (Netflix)*
Tales of Arcadia: Trollhunters (Netflix)
Watership Down (Netflix)

Outstanding Sound Mixing in a Preschool Animated Program

Beat Bugs: (Netflix)*
PAW Patrol: Mighty Pups (Nickelodeon)
Rusty Rivets (Nickelodeon)
The Stinky & Dirty Show (Amazon Prime Video)
Vampirina (Disney Junior)

Outstanding Sound Editing for a Live Action Program

Dino Dana (Amazon Prime Video)
The New Legends of Monkey (Netflix)
Sesame Street (HBO)
Six Dreams (Amazon Prime Video)
The Who Was? Show (Netflix)*

Outstanding Sound Editing – Animation

Big Hero 6: The Series (Disney Channel)
Lego DC Comic Super Hero The Flash (Amazon Prime Video)*
Tales of Arcadia: 3 Below (Netflix)
Tales of Arcadia: Trollhunters (Netflix)
Watership Down (Netflix)

Outstanding Sound Editing in a Preschool Animated Program

Beat Bugs: All Together Now (Netflix)
Elena of Avalor (Disney Junior)
Let’s Go Luna! (PBS Kids)
The Stinky & Dirty Show (Amazon Prime Video)
Vampirina (Disney Junior)*

Outstanding Music Direction and Composition

Disney Mickey Mouse (Disney Channel)
Elena of Avalor (Disney Junior)
The Loud House (Nickelodeon)
The Tom & Jerry Show (Cartoon Network)*
Watership Down (Netflix)

Outstanding Musical Performance in a Daytime Program

CBS This Morning Saturday (CBS)
Ashley McBride
“Girl Goin’ Nowhere/American Scandal”

LIVE With Kelly and Ryan (SYNDICATED)
Lindsay Stirling
“Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy”

Pickler and Ben (SYNDICATED)
Ben Rector
“Old Friends”

The Real (SYNDICATED)
Adirenne Houghton, Israel Houghton
“Secrets”

Today Show (NBC)*
Cast of the Band’s Visit
“Answer Me”

Outstanding Costume Design/Styling

The New Legends of Monkey (Netflix)*
Odd Squad (PBS)
Sesame Street (HBO)
The Talk (CBS)

Outstanding Hairstyling

Free Reign (Netflix)
Live With Kelly and Ryan (SYNDICATED)
The Real (SYNDICATED)
The Talk (CBS)*
The View (ABC)

Outstanding Makeup

Aliens Ate My Homework (Netflix)
The Price Is Right (CBS)
The Talk (CBS)*
The View (ABC)
Walk the Prank (DisneyXD)

Shameik Moore, Jake Johnson and ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ team untangle secrets of their groundbreaking movie

October 6, 2018

by Carla Hay

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Phil Lord, Christopher Miller, Jake Johnson, Lauren Velez, Shameik Moore, Brian Tyree Henry Bob Persichetti and Peter Ramsey at the “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” panel at New York Comic Con in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for Sony Pictures)

The animated film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” was one of the most talked-about revelations at the 2018 edition of New York Comic Con in New York City. Not only were fans given a huge surprise treat by seeing the first 35 minutes of the film before the panel discussion took place, but those in the audience who saw the sneak preview were also raving about it. Simply put: “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” (which opens in theaters on December 14, 2018) has the makings of being an award-winning hit.

The movie also represents the first time on the big screen that Spider-Man will be played by characters other than Peter Parker. The main Spider-Man in “Into the Spider-Verse” is Miles Morales, a half-Puerto Rican, half-African American high schooler from Brooklyn, who almost reluctantly becomes the masked webslinger under the mentorship of Parker. The trailers for the movie indicate that Morales’ love interest Gwen Stacy will also take on the persona of Spider-Gwen, plus there are other variations of Spider-Man in this movie’s alternate universe. (No spoilers here.)

After getting rapturous applause following the sneak preview, several members of the “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” team took to the stage for a discussion panel. They included Shameik Moore (voice of Miles Morales); Jake Johnson (voice of Peter Parker); Lauren Velez (voice of Rio Morales, Miles’ mother); Brian Tyree Henry (voice of Jefferson Davis, Miles’ father); producers Phil Lord and Chris Miller; and directors Bob Persichetti and Peter Ramsey. Here is what they said:

Christopher Miller, Phil Lord, Jake Johnson, Shameik Moore, Lauren Velez, Brian Tyree Henry, Bob Persichetti and Peter Ramsey at the “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” panel at New York Comic Con in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for Sony Pictures)

Phil and Chris, how did you get involved in “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”?

Lord: When Sony came to us and said, “Wouldn’t it be cool to do Spider-Man as an animated movie?” And the first thing we thought was, “Yeah, that would be awesome to see a comic book come to life, but wouldn’t it be the seventh Spider-Man movie? It would have to feel like something super-fresh.” So we said we wouldn’t want to do it unless it was Miles Morales’ story.

Miller: It seemed like they really wanted us to do this, so we could make some demands. And so, we used the fact that this story had been told a lot of times to our advantage, because the expectation now is, “How can we do it differently?”

The visuals are stunning. Peter and Bob, can you talk about the visual approach and how the story is set in Brooklyn?

Ramsey: As Phil said, this was a chance for us to really lean into a medium that was made for Spider-Man … How can we take advantage of a medium that has been visually expressive for so many years and tie it into the original source material? And so, we started to lean into flash frames and visuals that are really reminiscent of drawings, but we had to figure out a way to do it with a computer, which is its own giant task.

And then separately, we’ve seen the Peter Parker story. We know. We haven’t seen the Miles Morales story. Brooklyn is such a character. There are so many things that were born out of New York: hip-hop, graffiti, Miles. How do we view the movie with a character that is the city? Each borough has its own flavor.

Persichetti: The great thing for us, as filmmakers, is that the stars all kind of lined up, and we were in a situation where we had producers/creators—Phil [Lord]  and Chris [Miller]—who had a vision, and a studio that said, “You can do that,” even though they didn’t know what we were going to do.

Every step along of the way, everyone on the team pushed as far as they could into his idea of using animation to be more expressive, be like a comic book, honor the original source, and to try to bring New York 2018 to life in a way that everybody in the audience can understand, so everyone can go through this experience in Miles’ shoes. Hopefully, we got it right.

Ramsey: And I think the secret was we didn’t tell them how bold of a visual approach we were going to take until it was too late to change it.

Jake Johnson and Shameik Moore at the “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” panel at New York Comic Con in New York City.   (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for Sony Pictures)

Shameik, what was it like to inhabit the Miles Morales character?

Moore: I can relate to the upbringing we’re looking at. I’m not actually Latino, but I feel the spirit. I’m very excited. When I was younger and I first saw Miles Morales, I was like, “Dude, there’s a black Spider-Man out there.”

I wrote it down in a journal filming this movie called “Dope.” I said, “I am Miles Morales. I am Spider-Man.” And two years later, I got the opportunity, with these guys. We made an amazing movie. It really is a crazy thing.

Jake, what can you say about the Peter Parker character in “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”?

Johnson: It’s Peter Parker at 40. Peter Parker who’s a little chubby. Peter Parker who’s a little depressed. I just saw [the movie] this morning. It’s just so exciting, and I’m fired up to be in it.

Jake, how would you describe the relationship between Peter Parker and Miles Morales?

Johnson: They become partners in crime. They become unlikely friends. There’s a little bit of “The Karate Kid.” They end up needing each other to get out of a situation, and they become friends along the way.

Bryan Tyree Henry at the “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” panel at New York Comic Con in New York City.   (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for Sony Pictures)

Brian, how would you describe your Jefferson Davis character as Miles’ father?

Henry: It reminded me of my father. I was raised by my father for … most of my formative years—junior high through high school—puberty, mostly. My father was a Vietnam vet, and there was this kid he was trying to raise. Looking at the [the movie], I was like, “Oh, that’s what he was going through!” I didn’t think I was that bad, but I was off the chain!

There is nothing more important to me than to see a black boy and his father. We’ve seen the single mom trying to bring up a teenage boy to be a man, but it’s really nice to see … Miles Morales has both of his parents. He’s bilingual and raised in Brooklyn. His mom works in a hospital, and [his father] is a cop.

He had a damn good upbringing. We made a good man! It’s important for everyone to see that Miles is part of that. It was very important for me to be part of that, to be someone trying to raise [Miles] right and make him a decent man … And to play the husband of Lauren Velez? I jumped at the chance. Our son is the bomb! It’s an honor to be on this panel with all these creators. And Miles is “dope.” See what I did there?

Shameik Moore and Lauren Velez at the “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” panel at New York Comic Con in New York City.   (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for Sony Pictures)

Lauren, can you talk about your Rio character, who’s Miles’ mother?

Velez: This is my first animation [project] ever. I had no idea what to expect at all. I’m floored by everything. I’m floored by the storytelling, the visual style. Is that animation? Look at the depth of that. So much if it is beyond what I expected. I really have the most amazing family.

My son [Miles] is so dope and my husband is amazing. I’m the daughter of a cop [in real life], and seeing this [movie] made me think so much of my own family and growing … [Miles] doesn’t come from a broken home. He comes from a real stable, professional parenting environment and parents who want the best for him, and want him to achieve his highest potential. That’s why they’ve sent him away to a school that is better for him but is still diverse; he’s not completely away from his world. All of that I thought was so important.

And the bilingual aspect of it. I’m Nuyorican, and I think Miles is such loving, wonderful son on the cusp of manhood. I feel like [Rio] supports him in moving toward being the man she wants him to but still wants to nurture him and hold on to him and take care of him. I think, secretly, she thinks his art is so dope, and she supports that.

Marvel announces ‘Marvel Rising’ animation franchise and voice actors

December 7, 2017

The following is a press release from Marvel Entertainment:

Marvel Entertainment has announced “Marvel Rising,” a brand-new, multi-platform animation franchise starring the next generation of Marvel heroes set to launch in 2018. The program will launch with six, four-minute digital shorts that spotlight Spider-Gwen with her new secret moniker, Ghost-Spider, and introduce audiences to the world of “Marvel Rising.” Following the shorts, a feature-length animated film, “Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors” will premiere later that year. Distribution partners for the content to be announced at a later date.

Meet the characters and all-star voice actors behind the all-new franchise “Marvel Rising” here: https://youtu.be/6HTPCTtkWoA

The content features an all-star line-up of voice talent including Dove Cameron, Chloe Bennet, Tyler Posey, BooBoo Stewart, Kathreen Khavari, Milana Vayntrub, Cierra Ramirez, Kamil McFadden, Skai Jackson, Kim Raver, Ming-Na Wen, Steven Weber, and Dee Bradley Baker among others. Future stories and content are also being developed across Marvel’s digital and publishing platforms and will be announced at a later date.

“Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors” is a long-anticipated event, bringing together Marvel’s newest and beloved characters that have garnered major fan excitement over the last few years. Powered teens Ms. Marvel, Squirrel Girl, Quake, Patriot, America Chavez, and Inferno join forces as an unlikely, but formidable crew of aspiring heroes. When a threat no one could have expected bears down on the Marvel Universe, this ragtag, untrained band of teens have no choice but to rise together and prove to the world that sometimes the difference between a “hero” and “misfit” is just in the name.

“Marvel characters are so relatable because they live in our world and face the same challenges we do. So I’m very excited that our Marvel Rising team of heroes is so inclusive, reflecting characters with different backgrounds, particularly a set of strong female leads that our young audience can connect with,” said Cort Lane, Marvel’s Senior Vice President of Animation & Family Entertainment.

Sana Amanat, Marvel’s Director of Content & Character Development, added, “This project is unlike anything we’ve done before—from featuring the rising and fan-favorite stars of the Marvel Universe, to a visually distinct animation style, this is a groundbreaking animated event. It’s an action-packed adventure, full of comedy, heart and powerful messages for every kind of Marvel fan.”

Meet the characters behind “Marvel Rising”:

Gwen Stacy aka Ghost-Spider (formerly Spider Gwen) voiced by Dove Cameron (“Descendants,” “Hairspray Live”) – a free spirited teen who found her calling to be a super hero after being bitten by a radioactive spider and gaining spider-like powers. As Ghost-Spider, she aids those in need, but has to keep her alter-ego a secret from her father, Captain George Stacy, who sees Ghost-Spider as more of a menace than a hero.

Daisy Johnson aka Quake voiced by Chloe Bennet (“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” “Nashville”) – a leading agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. whose tendency for rule-breaking gets her into trouble now and then. Daisy befriends the young group of heroes and through them discovers how to become a better leader. She can generate powerful vibrational waves, which produce effects similar to earthquakes.

Dante Pertuz aka Inferno voiced by Tyler Posey (“Teen .Wolf,” “Lincoln Heights”) – a brooding, dark loner on the run. Dante has the power of pyrokinesis, which makes him capable of generating flames – however, he is not fully in control of his fiery abilities. It’s a thin line between good guy and villain for the unpredictable Inferno.

Victor Kohl aka Exile voiced by BooBoo Stewart (“Descendants,” “The Twilight Saga”) – a charming, handsome, and troublesome young Inhuman whose quest for superiority places him into the wrong crowd. He can use Darkforce energy to create weapons and portals that allow him to teleport.

Kamala Khan aka Ms. Marvel voiced by Kathreen Khavari (“Marvel’s Avengers Assemble,” “Big Little Lies”)  – a devoted fan of Super Heroes, especially of her mentor Captain Marvel; she is determined that she too can be a great hero! If only she’d be taken seriously. Kamala is equipped with metamorphic powers that allow her to stretch, enlarge, or shrink her overall size, parts of her body, or alter her physical appearance. She is especially fond of “embiggening” her fists.

Doreen Green aka Squirrel Girl voiced by Milana Vayntrub (“Marvel’s New Warriors,” “This Is Us”) – the uber-positive, hilarious best friend and teammate of Ms. Marvel. With advanced computer skills, enhanced strength, agility, durability, and senses of a squirrel, Doreen (along with her squirrel partner, Tippy Toe!), is primed and ready to become a successful hero.

America Chavez voiced by Cierra Ramirez (“The Fosters,” “The Secret Life of an America Teenager”) – a strong, independent young hero whose painful past drives her to reject leadership and remain a loner. America’s powers include superhuman strength, speed, and durability, plus the ability to fly.

Rayshaun Lucas aka Patriot voiced by Kamil McFadden (“K.C. Undercover,” “Grown Ups 2”) – a natural born leader who is quick to leap into action to impress his colleagues at S.H.I.E.L.D. Rayshaun strives to live up to Captain America’s legacy with integrity, honesty, and order above all. His skills include heightened strength, speed, stamina, and durability.

Gloria “Glory” Grant voiced by Skai JacksFron (“Bunk’d,” “Jessie”) – Gloria, or ‘Glory,’ is Gwen Stacy’s friend and member of their garage band “The Emm-Jays.” Gloria is a smart, hard-working girl that genuinely cares for Gwen, but has felt a distance growing between them ever since their friend, Kevin, was murdered. When being casual, Gloria’s known to be funny, sarcastic and sassy.

Carol Danvers aka Captain Marvel voiced by Kim Raver (“Grey’s Anatomy,” “24”) – a bold leader who doesn’t sugar-coat and is guided by a strong sense of duty and honor. She’s the ultimate inspiration for our band of misfit heroes. She is equipped with superhuman strength, can fly at high speeds, and can project intense energy blasts.

Hala voiced by Ming-Na Wen (“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” “Mulan”) – Hala is a Kree Accuser bent on galactic domination. She’ll go to any length or treacherous means to achieve what she, and the entire Kree race, wants: Power. Hala is cold, cryptic and nefarious, often challenging those who try to oppose her.

Captain George Stacy voiced by Steven Weber (“13 Reasons Why,” “NCIS: New Orleans”) – Chief of the NYPD and Gwen Stacy’s loving, but fiercely protective father. Captain Stacy is a very disciplined, hard-working man that will stop at nothing to obtain justice – who unfortunately sees Ghost-Spider as a menace and a threat to society.

Lockjaw and Tippy Toe are voiced by Dee Bradley Baker (“Star Wars Rebels,” “Gravity Falls”). Two lovable and heroic sidekicks: Lockjaw is Kamala’s trusty, teleporting mutt and Tippy Toe is Doreen’s partner in crime and best squirrel friend.

“Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors” is executive produced by Joe Quesada, Dan Buckley, Cort Lane, and Eric Radomski; co-executive produced by Stan Lee, Sana Amanat, and Marsha Griffin. The film and shorts were written by Mairghread Scott. Alfred Gimeno served as supervising director.

For more information, check out “Marvel Rising” at www.Facebook.com/MarvelRising,  www.Twitter.com/MarvelRisingSW, and www.Instagram.com/MarvelRising

Subscribe to Marvel HQ on YouTube for full episodes and more: www.youtube.com/MarvelHQ

About Marvel Entertainment

Marvel, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world’s most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of more than 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media over seventy-five years.  Marvel utilizes its character franchises in entertainment, licensing and publishing.

For more information visit marvel.com.