2018 Golden Globe Awards: Oprah Winfrey named recipient of Cecil B. de Mille Award

December 13, 2017

Oprah Winfrey
Oprah Winfrey in Vogue’s September 2017 issue (Photo by Annie Leibovitz)

The following is a press release from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association:

Acclaimed actress, producer, television star and entrepreneur Oprah Winfrey will be honored with the 2018 Cecil B. de Mille Award at the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards on Sunday, January 7, 2018, hosted by Seth Meyers. The 2018 Golden Globe Awards will air LIVE coast-to-coast on NBC from 5-8 p.m. PT / 8-11 p.m. ET from The Beverly Hilton. The news was exclusively announced by 2012 Cecil B. de Mille Award recipient Morgan Freeman during the airing of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s (HFPA) “Golden Globe 75th Anniversary Special” on NBC.

Meher Tatna, President of the HFPA stated, “The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is delighted to announce Oprah Winfrey as the recipient of the 2018 Cecil B. de Mille Award.  As a global media leader, philanthropist, producer and actress, she has created an unparalleled connection with people around the world, making her one of the most respected and admired figures today. For generations, Oprah has celebrated strong female characters on and off screen, and has been a role model for women and young girls for decades. Holding titles such as Chairman, CEO and Founder, Oprah is one of the most influential women of our time, and this honor is well deserved especially in this 75th anniversary year of the Golden Globe Awards.”

Chosen by the HFPA Board of Directors, the Cecil B. de Mille Award is given annually to a talented individual who has made an incredible impact on the world of entertainment. Honorees over the decades include Audrey Hepburn, Barbra Streisand, Denzel Washington, George Clooney, Harrison Ford, Jodie Foster, Lucille Ball, Martin Scorsese, Meryl Streep, Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Robin Williams, Sidney Poitier, Sophia Loren, Steven Spielberg, and many more.

For 25 years, Winfrey was host of the award-winning talk show “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” As Chairman and CEO, she’s guiding her successful cable network, OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network, is the founder of O, The Oprah Magazine, and oversees Harpo Films.

Winfrey is a Golden Globe Award-nominated actress for her role in “The Color Purple,” earned critical acclaim in “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” and produced and acted in the Academy Award-winning film “Selma.”  Winfrey starred in the Emmy-nominated HBO Films “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” and will portray “Mrs. Which” in Disney’s “Wrinkle in Time” film adaptation from director Ava DuVernay releasing in March 2018.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of The Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa as they celebrate the school’s seventh graduating class. Winfrey established the school in 2007 to provide education for academically gifted girls from disadvantaged backgrounds. Graduates of the school have continued on to higher education both in South Africa and at colleges and universities around the world.

Produced by dick clark productions in association with the HFPA, the Golden Globe Awards are viewed in more than 236 countries worldwide and are one of the few awards ceremonies to include both motion picture and television achievements.

Meher Tatna is President of the HFPA. Allen Shapiro, CEO of dick clark productions; Mike Mahan, President of dick clark productions; and Barry Adelman, Executive VP of Television of dick clark productions, will serve as executive producers.

About the Hollywood Foreign Press Association
Founded in the 1940s during World War II, the HFPA was originally comprised of a handful of L.A.-based overseas journalists who sought to bridge the international community with Hollywood, and to provide distraction from the hardships of war through film. Seventy-five years later, members of the HFPA represent 56 countries with a combined readership of 250 million in some of the world’s most respected publications. Each year, the organization holds the third most watched awards show on television, the Golden Globe® Awards, which has enabled the organization to donate nearly $30 million to entertainment-related charities, scholarship programs and humanitarian efforts over the last 25 years. This year, the HFPA has distributed $3 million in grants through their Charitable Trust to a diverse group of organizations and institutions within the entertainment industry. For more information, please visit www.GoldenGlobes.com and follow us on Twitter (@GoldenGlobes) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/GoldenGlobes).

Dec. 13, 2017 — Acclaimed actress, producer, television star and entrepreneur Oprah Winfrey will be honored with the 2018 Cecil B. de Mille Award at the 75th Annual Golden Globe® Awards on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, hosted by Seth Meyers. The 2018 Golden Globe Awards will air LIVE coast-to-coast on NBC from 5-8 p.m. PT / 8-11 p.m. ET from The Beverly Hilton. The news was exclusively announced by 2012 Cecil B. de Mille Award recipient Morgan Freeman during the airing of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s (HFPA) “Golden Globe 75th Anniversary Special” on NBC.

Meher Tatna, President of the HFPA stated, “The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is delighted to announce Oprah Winfrey as the recipient of the 2018 Cecil B. de Mille Award.  As a global media leader, philanthropist, producer and actress, she has created an unparalleled connection with people around the world, making her one of the most respected and admired figures today. For generations, Oprah has celebrated strong female characters on and off screen, and has been a role model for women and young girls for decades. Holding titles such as Chairman, CEO and Founder, Oprah is one of the most influential women of our time, and this honor is well deserved especially in this 75th anniversary year of the Golden Globe Awards.”

Chosen by the HFPA Board of Directors, the Cecil B. de Mille Award is given annually to a talented individual who has made an incredible impact on the world of entertainment. Honorees over the decades include Audrey Hepburn, Barbra Streisand, Denzel Washington, George Clooney, Harrison Ford, Jodie Foster, Lucille Ball, Martin Scorsese, Meryl Streep, Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Robin Williams, Sidney Poitier, Sophia Loren, Steven Spielberg, and many more.

For 25 years, Winfrey was host of the award-winning talk show “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” As Chairman and CEO, she’s guiding her successful cable network, OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network, is the founder of O, The Oprah Magazine, and oversees Harpo Films.

Winfrey is a Golden Globe Award-nominated actress for her role in “The Color Purple,” earned critical acclaim in “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” and produced and acted in the Academy Award-winning film “Selma.”  Winfrey starred in the Emmy-nominated HBO Films “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” and will portray “Mrs. Which” in Disney’s “Wrinkle in Time” film adaptation from director Ava DuVernay releasing in March 2018.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of The Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa as they celebrate the school’s seventh graduating class. Winfrey established the school in 2007 to provide education for academically gifted girls from disadvantaged backgrounds. Graduates of the school have continued on to higher education both in South Africa and at colleges and universities around the world.

Produced by dick clark productions in association with the HFPA, the Golden Globe Awards are viewed in more than 236 countries worldwide and are one of the few awards ceremonies to include both motion picture and television achievements.

Meher Tatna is President of the HFPA. Allen Shapiro, CEO of dick clark productions; Mike Mahan, President of dick clark productions; and Barry Adelman, Executive VP of Television of dick clark productions, will serve as executive producers.
 
About the Hollywood Foreign Press Association

Founded in the 1940s during World War II, the HFPA was originally comprised of a handful of L.A.-based overseas journalists who sought to bridge the international community with Hollywood, and to provide distraction from the hardships of war through film. Seventy-five years later, members of the HFPA represent 56 countries with a combined readership of 250 million in some of the world’s most respected publications. Each year, the organization holds the third most watched awards show on television, the Golden Globe® Awards, which has enabled the organization to donate nearly $30 million to entertainment-related charities, scholarship programs and humanitarian efforts over the last 25 years. This year, the HFPA has distributed $3 million in grants through their Charitable Trust to a diverse group of organizations and institutions within the entertainment industry. For more information, please visit www.GoldenGlobes.com and follow us on Twitter (@GoldenGlobes) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/GoldenGlobes).

About dick clark productions

dick clark productions (dcp) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Golden Globe Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest,” “Hollywood Film Awards” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and dcp. dcp also owns one of the world’s most unique and extensive entertainment archive libraries with over 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances and legendary programming. For additional information, visit www.dickclark.com.

2018 Golden Globe Awards: ‘The Shape of Water’ leads movie nominations, ‘Big Little Lies’ has the most TV nods

December 11, 2017

by Carla Hay

The 75th Golden Globe Awards

Richard Jenkins and Sally Hawkins in “The Shape of Water” (Photo courtesy of Fox Searchlight Pictures)
Shailene Woodley, Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman in “Big Little Lies’ (Photo courtesy of HBO)

With seven nominations, “The Shape of Water” is the leading contender overall and in the movie categories for the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards, which is set to take place at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on January 7, 2018. NBC will have the U.S. telecast of the show, which will be hosted by Seth Meyers. The HBO limited series “Big Little Lies” received the most Golden Globe nominations (six) in the TV categories.

The Golden Globe Awards are presented and voted by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Dick Clark Productions (DCP) produces the telecast.

The nominations for the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards were announced at the Beverly Hilton on December 11, 2017 by actors Alfre Woodard, Garrett Hedlund, Kristen Bell and Sharon Stone,  with HFPA president, Meher Tatna and DCP executive vice president of television Barry Adelman. Eligible movies are those with theatrical releases of at least one week in the U.S. in 2017. Eligible TV shows are those that premiered new episodes in the U.S. in 2017.

NBC will televise “Golden Globes 75th Anniversary Special” at 9 p.m. ET/PT  on December 13, 2017. “Will & Grace” stars Eric McCormack and Debra Messing are hosts of the show.

Predicted Contenders

Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf in “Lady Bird” (Photo by Merie Wallace)

“The Shape of Water” is also the top nominee at the 2018 Critics’ Choice Awards, and the American Film Institute has named “The Shape of Water” among the 10 best films of 2017.  Almost all of the films nominated for Best Motion Picture at the Golden Globes have also received similar nominations at other award shows so far. They include “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” “The Post,” “Lady Bird” and “I, Tonya.”

In the TV categories, several shows that made the Golden Globes nominations list in addition to the Emmy-winning “Big Little Lies” have also been nominated or won at the 2017 Emmys, including “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “This Is Us,” “Stranger Things,” “Feud: Bette and Joan,” “Fargo,” “The Wizard of Lies” and “The Crown.” (“Game of Thrones” was not eligible for the Emmys this year.)

Movie Snubs and Surprises

Kumail Nanjiani and Zoe Kazan in “The Big Sick” (Photo courtesy of Amazon Studios)

Noticeable movie snubs include “The Big Sick,” which has been getting a lot of nominations at other award shows that honor movies. However, “The Big Sick” failed to get any Golden Globe nominations. Jordan Peele has been racking up nominations at several other award shows for writing and directing the critically acclaimed hit “Get Out,” but he was left out of the Golden Globes race for writing and directing. However, as one of the producers of “Get Out,” Peele did get a Golden Globe nod for Best Motion Picture. Curiously, even though “Get Out” is a thriller/horror movie, the Golden Globe Awards put it in the category of comedy or musical, where “Get Out” did manage to get two Golden Globe nominations: for Best Motion Picture and for Best Actor.

Superhero and sci-fi movies have a tough time getting nominations outside of technical/production categories (such as visual effects, production design, editing and cinematography), so it’s not too surprising that “Wonder Woman,” “Thor: Ragnarok,” “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “Logan” were shut out of the Golden Globes, even though these movies were critically acclaimed hits. It’s unknown if enough Golden Globe voters saw “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” in time to vote for it, and “Blade Runner 2049” got too many mixed and disappointed reactions from critics and audiences to be a serious Golden Globes contender.

Michelle Williams in “All the Money in the World” (Photo by Fabio Lovino)

Two films that have been embraced by the Golden Globes but snubbed at other movie-related ceremonies so far are the musical “The Greatest Showman” and the kidnapping drama “All the Money in the World,” which received three nominations each. “All the Money in the World” was abruptly re-shot and re-edited in November 2017, one month before its release, to remove co-star Kevin Spacey after his sexual misconduct scandal made him a Hollywood pariah. Spacey was replaced in the film by Christopher Plummer, who received a Golden Globe nod for the film, as did the movie’s lead actress Michelle Williams and director Ridley Scott.

Meanwhile, the Billie Jean King/Bobby Riggs feature film “Battle of the Sexes” has been virtually ignored by most award shows so far, but managed to get two Golden Globe nods for stars Emma Stone and Steve Carell. Although “Battle of the Sexes” is really a drama, the Golden Globes have it in the category of musical or comedy. This misplacement of dramatic, non-musical movies in the musical or comedy category is something that seems to happen every year with the Golden Globes, and it’s one of the biggest criticisms that the show gets.

TV Snubs and Surprises

Julia Louis-Dreyfus in “Veep” (Photo courtesy of HBO)

In the TV categories, the Golden Globe voters show that they have very different tastes from Emmy voters when it comes to comedies. “Veep,” “Saturday Night Live” and “Modern Family,” which consistently get Emmy nominations and/or wins, failed to receive any Golden Globe nominations this time around. (“Atlanta,” which has won Golden Globes and Emmys, was not eligible for any Golden Globes this year because the show did not air any new episodes in 2017.)

Former Golden Globe favorites “Orange Is the New Black,” “House of Cards” and “Transparent” were completely snubbed. “House of Cards,” which starred Spacey until he was fired from the show in October 2017, was no doubt tainted by his sex scandal. “Transparent” also seems to have met a similar fate: the show’s star Jeffrey Tambor quit “Transparent” in November 2017, after he was accused of sexually harassing two of his “Transparent” co-workers. Tambor has denied the allegations. Spacey has apologized for one allegation against him made  by actor Anthony Rapp, but Spacey has not publicly commented on numerous other allegations against him. “House of Cards,” which already announced that its sixth season premiering in 2018 will be the show’s last season, has since announced that Spacey will not be replaced, and Robin Wright will take the lead role in the cast. “Transparent” will also continue without Tambor, but the show has not yet announced any details about future storylines or other changes to the cast.

Frankie Shaw (pictured at left) in “SMILF” (Photo courtesy of Showtime)

The Golden Globes embrace TV newcomers, and many of the TV nominees in the comedy categories are newbies such as “SMILF” (two nominations), “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (two nominations), as well as “The Good Doctor,” “GLOW,” “The Deuce” and “I Love Dick,” which received one nomination each. However, there’s a big difference between new, original shows and “new-ish” shows that are reboots or remakes. Of the many TV series that were rebooted or remade this year, only two received Golden Globe nominations: “Will & Grace” (two nods) and “Twin Peaks” (one nod), which is a clear indication that Golden Globe voters are not enamored with most new versions of old TV shows. In addition, TV shows that are based on movies got completely snubbed.

Sexual Harassment Fallout

Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright in “House of Cards” (Photo courtesy of Netflix)

As previously mentioned, sexual misconduct scandals seem to have had an effect on Netflix’s “House of Cards” and Amazon’s “Transparent” being snubbed by the Golden Globes this year. Several other actors who have in recent months been hit with sexual misconduct allegations include Jeremy Piven, Ed Westwick, Danny Masterson and Dustin Hoffman. None of them was expected to get any Golden Globe nominations this year, although Hoffman campaigned for his role in the Netflix movie “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected).”

Louis C.K.’s sexual misconduct scandal in November 2017 and his admission that all the allegations against him are true have virtually ensured that he won’t be nominated for any major awards for the foreseable future. His FX comedy series “Louie,” which has been on hiatus since 2015, was cancelled after the scandal hit, and the show would have been ineligible for any awards this year anyway. Louis C.K. was an executive producer of FX’s “Better Things” until the network fired him from the show, but “Better Things” star/executive producer Pamela Adlon received a Golden Globe nod despite the scandal.

The Weinstein Company, which ousted co-founder Harvey Weinstein in October 2017, was not surprisingly shut out of the Golden Globes race this year, although the company didn’t have any really serious awards contenders for the first time in years. The closest to being an awards contender was the crime thriller “Wind River,” but award-show buzz for the movie had already faded before the Weinstein scandal hit.

However a sexual misconduct scandal seems to have had no negative effect on the award-show chances for Pixar Animation Studios, which placed chief creative officer John Lasseter on leave for sexual misconduct in November 2017. Pixar still got Golden Globe nominations for “Coco,” which is already being touted as the Oscar frontrunner to win Best Animated Feature.

“Genius” star Geoffrey Rush, nominated for a Golden Globe in the limited series, has been accused of sexual harassment, but he has vehemently denied the allegations, which were published in November 2017 by Sydney-based newspaper the Daily Telegraph. Rush is now suing the Daily Telegraph for libel.

Amazon Studios, which ousted chief Roy Price in November, had mixed results at the Golden Globes this year, by receiving three nominations, but only in the TV categories: two nods for “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and one nomination for “I Love Dick.” Amazon’s movies released in 2017 were completely snubbed by the Golden Globes, most notably “The Big Sick,” which is Amazon’s 2017 movie that is most likely to be nominated at any major award show that honors movies.

The following is the complete list of nominations for the 2018 Golden Globe Awards:

1.       BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

 

a. Call Me By Your Name
Frenesy Film / La Cinéfacture Productions / Water’s End Productions;  Sony Pictures Classics
b. Dunkirk
Warner Bros. Pictures / Syncopy; Warner Bros. Pictures
c. The Post
DreamWorks Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox
d. The Shape of Water
Double Dare You; Fox Searchlight Pictures
e. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Blueprint Pictures; Fox Searchlight Pictures

 

2.     BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

 

a. Jessica Chastain Molly’s Game
b. Sally Hawkins The Shape of Water
c. Frances McDormand Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
d. Meryl Streep The Post
e. Michelle Williams All the Money in the World

 

 

3.     BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

 

a. Timothée Chalamet Call Me By Your Name
b. Daniel Day-Lewis Phantom Thread
c. Tom Hanks The Post
d. Gary Oldman Darkest Hour
e. Denzel Washington Roman J. Israel, Esq.

4.     BEST MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

 

a. The Disaster Artist
Good Universe / Point Grey / Ratpac-Dune / WB/New Line Pictures; A24
b. Get Out
Blumhouse / QC Entertainment / Monkeypaw Productions; Universal Pictures
c. The Greatest Showman
Twentieth Century Fox; Twentieth Century Fox
d. I, Tonya
Clubhouse Pictures / LuckyChap Entertainment; NEON
e. Lady Bird
IAC Films; A24

 

 

5.     BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

 

a. Judi Dench Victoria & Abdul
b. Helen Mirren The Leisure Seeker
c. Margot Robbie I, Tonya
d. Saoirse Ronan Lady Bird
e. Emma Stone Battle of the Sexes

 

6.     BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

 

a. Steve Carell Battle of the Sexes
b. Ansel Elgort Baby Driver
c. James Franco The Disaster Artist
d. Hugh Jackman The Greatest Showman
e. Daniel Kaluuya Get Out

 

 

7.     BEST MOTION PICTURE – ANIMATED

 

a. The Boss Baby
DreamWorks Animation LLC; Twentieth Century Fox
b. The Breadwinner
Cartoon Saloon / Aircraft Pictures / Melusine Productions; GKIDS
c. Coco
Pixar Animation Studios; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
d. Ferdinand
Blue Sky Studios; Twentieth Century Fox
e. Loving Vincent
Breakthru Films / Trademark Films; Good Deed Entertainment

 

 

8.     BEST MOTION PICTURE – FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

a. A Fantastic Woman (Chile)
Fabula, Participant Media, Komplizen Film, Muchas Gracias, Setembro Cine; Sony Pictures Classics
b. First They Killed My Father (Cambodia)
Bophana; Netflix
c. In the Fade (Germany / France)
Bombero International / Macassar Productions; Magnolia Pictures
d. Loveless (Russia)
Non-Stop Productions, Fetisoff Illusion, Why Not Productions, Arte France Cinema, Les Films du Fleuve, Senator Film; Sony Pictures Classics
e. The Square (Sweden / Germany / France)
Plattform Produktion / Arte France Cinéma / Coproduction Office / Det Danske Filminstitut / Essential Filmproduktion GmbH / Film i Väst; Magnolia Pictures

 

9.     BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN ANY MOTION PICTURE

 

a. Mary J. Blige Mudbound
b. Hong Chau Downsizing
c. Allison Janney I, Tonya
d. Laurie Metcalf Lady Bird
e. Octavia Spencer The Shape of Water

 

 

10.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN ANY MOTION PICTURE

 

a. Willem Dafoe The Florida Project
b. Armie Hammer Call Me By Your Name
c. Richard Jenkins The Shape of Water
d. Christopher Plummer All the Money in the World
e. Sam Rockwell Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

 

11.  BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

 

a. Guillermo del Toro The Shape of Water
b. Martin McDonagh Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
c. Christopher Nolan Dunkirk
d. Ridley Scott All the Money in the World
e. Steven Spielberg The Post

 

 

12.  BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

 

a. Guillermo del Toro, Vanessa Taylor The Shape of Water
b. Greta Gerwig Lady Bird
c. Liz Hannah, Josh Singer The Post
d. Martin McDonagh Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
e. Aaron Sorkin Molly’s Game

 

13.  BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

 

a. Carter Burwell Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
b. Alexandre Desplat The Shape of Water
c. Jonny Greenwood Phantom Thread
d. John Williams The Post
e. Hans Zimmer Dunkirk

 

14.  BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

 

a. “Home” — Ferdinand
Music by: Nick Jonas, Justin Tranter, Nick Monson
Lyrics by: Nick Jonas, Justin Tranter
b. “Mighty River” — Mudbound
Music by: Raphael Saadiq
Lyrics by: Mary J. Blige, Raphael Saadiq, Taura Stinson
c. “Remember Me” — Coco
Music by: Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
Lyrics by: Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
d. “The Star” — The Star
Music by: Mariah Carey, Marc Shaiman
Lyrics by: Mariah Carey, Marc Shaiman
e. “This Is Me” — The Greatest Showman
Music by: Benj Pasek, Justin Paul
Lyrics by: Benj Pasek, Justin Paul

 

15.  BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

a. The Crown Netflix
Left Bank Pictures / Sony Pictures Television
b. Game of Thrones HBO
HBO Entertainment / Bighead, Littlehead / Television 360 / Startling Television
c. The Handmaid’s Tale Hulu
MGM
d. Stranger Things Netflix
Netflix
e. This Is Us NBC
20th Century Fox Television

 

16.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

 

a. Caitriona Balfe Outlander
b. Claire Foy The Crown
c. Maggie Gyllenhaal The Deuce
d. Katherine Langford 13 Reasons Why
e. Elisabeth Moss The Handmaid’s Tale

 

17.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

 

a. Jason Bateman Ozark
b. Sterling K. Brown This Is Us
c. Freddie Highmore The Good Doctor
d. Bob Odenkirk Better Call Saul
e. Liev Schreiber Ray Donovan

 

18.  BEST TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

 

a. Black-ish ABC
ABC Studios
b. The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Amazon
Amazon Studios
c. Master of None Netflix
Universal Television / Oh Brudder Productions / Alan Yang Productions / Fremulon Productions / 3 Arts Entertainment
d. SMILF Showtime
ABC Signature Studios / SupahSmaht, Inc / Quantity Entertainment / Groundswell Productions
e. Will & Grace NBC
Universal Television

 

19.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

 

a. Pamela Adlon Better Things
b. Alison Brie GLOW
c. Rachel Brosnahan The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
d. Issa Rae Insecure
e. Frankie Shaw SMILF

 

20.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY

 

a. Anthony Anderson Black-ish
b. Aziz Ansari Master of None
c. Kevin Bacon I Love Dick
d. William H. Macy Shameless
e. Eric McCormack Will & Grace

 

21.  BEST TELEVISION LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

 

a. Big Little Lies HBO
HBO Entertainment / David E. Kelly Productions / Pacific Standard / Blossom Films
b. Fargo FX
MGM Television / FX Productions
c. Feud: Bette and Joan FX
Fox 21 Television Studios
d. The Sinner USA NETWORK
Universal Cable Productions
e. Top Of The Lake: China Girl SUNDANCETV
SeeSaw Films

 

22.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

 

a. Jessica Biel The Sinner
b. Nicole Kidman Big Little Lies
c. Jessica Lange Feud: Bette and Joan
d. Susan Sarandon Feud: Bette and Joan
e. Reese Witherspoon Big Little Lies

 

23.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

 

a. Robert De Niro The Wizard of Lies
b. Jude Law The Young Pope
c. Kyle McLachlan Twin Peaks
d. Ewan McGregor Fargo
e. Geoffrey Rush Genius

 

24.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

 

a. Laura Dern Big Little Lies
b. Ann Dowd The Handmaid’s Tale
c. Chrissy Metz This Is Us
d. Michelle Pfeiffer The Wizard of Lies
e. Shailene Woodley Big Little Lies

 

25.  BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

 

a. David Harbour Stranger Things
b. Alfred Molina Feud: Bette and Joan
c. Christian Slater Mr. Robot
d. Alexander Skarsgård Big Little Lies
e. David Thewlis Fargo

 

 

NOMINATIONS BY MOTION PICTURE DISTRIBUTOR

MOTION PICTURE DISTRIBUTOR

NOMINATIONS

Fox Searchlight Pictures

15

Twentieth Century Fox

12

A24

7

Sony Pictures Classics

6

Sony Pictures Releasing

6

Focus Features

4

NEON

3

Netflix

3

Warner Bros. Pictures

3

Magnolia Pictures

2

STX Entertainment

2

Universal Pictures

2

Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

2

GKIDS

1

Good Deed Entertainment

1

Paramount Pictures

1

 

 

NOMINATIONS BY TELEVISION NETWORK

TELEVISION NETWORK

NOMINATIONS

HBO

12

Netflix

9

FX

8

NBC

5

Showtime

5

ABC

3

Amazon

3

Hulu

3

USA Network

3

AMC

1

National Geographic

1

Starz

1

SundanceTV

1

 

 

 

 

 

NOMINATIONS BY MOTION PICTURE

MOTION PICTURE

NOMINATIONS

The Shape of Water

7

The Post

6

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

6

Lady Bird

4

All the Money in the World

3

Call Me By Your Name

3

Dunkirk

3

The Greatest Showman

3

I, Tonya

3

Battle of the Sexes

2

Coco

2

The Disaster Artist

2

Ferdinand

2

Get Out

2

Molly’s Game

2

Mudbound

2

Phantom Thread

2

A Fantastic Woman

1

Baby Driver

1

The Boss Baby

1

The Breadwinner

1

Darkest Hour

1

Downsizing

1

First They Killed My Father

1

The Florida Project

1

In the Fade

1

The Leisure Seeker

1

Loveless

1

Loving Vincent

1

Roman J. Israel, Esq.

1

The Square

1

The Star

1

Victoria & Abdul

1

 

 

NOMINATIONS BY TELEVISION SERIES OR PROGRAM

 

TELEVISION SERIES OR PROGRAM

NOMINATIONS
Big Little Lies

6

Feud: Bette and Joan

4

Fargo

3

The Handmaid’s Tale

3

This Is Us

3

black-ish

2

The Crown

2

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

2

Master of None

2

The Sinner

2

SMILF

2

Stranger Things

2

Will & Grace

2

The Wizard of Lies

2

13 Reasons Why

1

Better Call Saul

1

Better Things

1

The Deuce

1

Game of Thrones

1

Genius

1

GLOW

1

The Good Doctor

1

I Love Dick

1

Insecure

1

Mr. Robot

1

Outlander

1

Ozark

1

Ray Donovan

1

Shameless

1

Top Of The Lake: China Girl

1

Twin Peaks

1

The Young Pope

1

2018 Golden Globe Awards: Seth Meyers named as host

November 22, 2017

Seth Meyers
Seth Meyers (Photo by Lloyd Bishop/NBC)

The following is an announcement from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association:

And we have a host: Seth Meyers will serve as MC of the 75th Golden Globe Awards ceremony. The host of NBC’s “Late Night with Seth Meyers will step into a role that in recent years has been Tina Fey’s and Amy Poehler’s, Ricky Gervais’ and most recently Jimmy Fallon’s.

“The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is excited to have Seth Meyers host the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards”, said HFPA President Meher Tatna. “With his natural comedic wit and innate ability to charm audiences, Seth will help us carry on the celebratory tradition of recognizing the best in television and film at the Party of the Year.”

The writer-comedian is a 12-year veteran of “Saturday Night Live,” both in the writers’ room and behind the desk of “Weekend Update”.

The one-time “SNL” head writer (he succeeded fellow Globes host, Tina Fey, in that capacity) is also no stranger to awards shows, having done the honors for the 2010 ESPY awards and for the Prime Time Emmys in 2014. Now he will take on Globes duties in our Diamond Jubilee edition.

The 75thAnnual Golden Globe Awards presentation will take place on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018. The ceremony will air on NBC live coast-to-coast at 8 p.m. ET. Nominations will be announced Monday, Dec. 11, 2017.

Golden Globes 75th Anniversary Special: premiere date and hosts announced

November 20, 2017

Eric McCormack and Debra Messing
Eric McCormack and Debra Messing  (Photo by: Heidi Gutman/NBCUniversal)

The following is a press release from NBC:

NBC, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) and dick clark productions (dcp) are teaming up for the “Golden Globes 75th Anniversary Special,” set to air Wednesday, Dec. 13 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

The two-hour special will be hosted by Eric McCormack and Debra Messing, who have a combined 13 Golden Globe nominations between them and star in NBC’s critically acclaimed revival of “Will & Grace,” which currently ranks as NBC’s most-watched primetime comedy in the last 12 years.

The program will showcase the best moments spanning 75 years of the Golden Globes, featuring the biggest film and TV stars, red carpet highlights and fashion throughout the years. The special will also feature new and exclusive interviews with Amy Adams, Jake Gyllenhaal, Christine Lahti, Nicole Kidman, Julia Roberts, Jacob Tremblay, Kate Winslet, Brad Goreski and more. Celebrating the nonstop glamour, humor, heartfelt speeches and classic moments from Hollywood’s party of the year, the “Golden Globes 75th Anniversary Special” will also include comedic highlights from past hosts and presenters and a countdown of the best Golden Globe Award-winning movies of all time, as selected by members of the HFPA.

The “Golden Globes 75th Anniversary Special” is produced by dcp in association with the HFPA.

The HFPA and dcp will present the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018. The ceremony will air on NBC live coast-to-coast at 8 p.m. ET. Nominations will be announced Monday, Dec. 11.

About the Hollywood Foreign Press Association

Founded in the 1940s during World War II, the HFPA was originally comprised of a handful of L.A.-based overseas journalists who sought to bridge the international community with Hollywood, and to provide distraction from the hardships of war through film. More than seventy years later, members of the HFPA represent 56 countries with a combined readership of 250 million in some of the world’s most respected publications. Each year, the organization holds the third most watched awards show on television, the Golden Globe® Awards, which has enabled the organization to donate more than $25 million to entertainment-related charities and scholarship programs. For more information, please visit www.GoldenGlobes.com and follow us on Twitter (@GoldenGlobes) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/GoldenGlobes).

About dick clark productions

dick clark productions (dcp) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Golden Globe Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest,” “Hollywood Film Awards” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and dcp. dcp also owns one of the world’s most unique and extensive entertainment archive libraries with over 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances and legendary programming. For additional information, visit www.dickclark.com.

Tom Hiddleston backstage at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards

January 9, 2017

by Carla Hay

The 74th annual Golden Globe Awards took place on January 8, 2017, at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California.

TOM HIDDLESTON

Golden Globe win:

Best Actor in a Mini-Series or Television Film

(“The Night Manager”)

Here is what this Golden Globe winner said backstage in the Golden Globe Awards press room.

Tom Hiddleston at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017.
Tom Hiddleston at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

BACKSTAGE INTERVIEW

You filmed “The Night Manager” and “Thor: Ragnarok” in Australia. Do you pinch yourself knowing that you have these very different acting roles?

I do. I feel very lucky. When I became an actor, I wanted to move between genres and characters and never repeat myself or play the same thing twice. I have played Loki four times, but the idea that I’m allowed to play both Jonathan Pine and Loki and my character in “Kong: Skull Island,” which I was also in Australia for is truly everything I’ve always wished for is an actor, so I feel immensely fortunate.

How were you challenged in your “Night Manager” role? Did you feel you were challenged differently from your past roles?

Certainly. If you read the novel by John le Carré, it’s such a rich resource. And quite apart from being a master storyteller of espionage thrillers, John le Carré is it is a very curious student of British identity. And I think through Jonathan Pine, he’s trying to get underneath the skin of what it means to be English, how Englishness changes when were abroad, how it changes when we fight for our country, because Jonathan Pine is a former soldier, and also how it manifests in the character of Richard Roper who is an arms dealer to whom people are very drawn because Richard Roper is attractive and charismatic in and you like him, but he is deeply cynical. And I think that le Carré’s anger is that a man like Roper is an inheritor of the freedoms of British democracy but has chosen to the worst things imaginable.

With Pine, the challenge is he’s a spy. And spies dissemble and conceal and they have to be believable as they lie. And the nature of acting is always exploring identity but Pine is four different people he has to be believable in all his different guises. And that was fascinating for me to play different people with different names were different passports. So very different very new and very exciting.

At the beginning of the series, Pine is a night manager. How did “The Night Manager” director Susanne Bier talk to you about that character when we meet him at first?

Susanne and I talked a lot about uniform. Pine is a former soldier in our adaptation of the second Iraq War in 2003. And he has for reasons, perhaps known only to himself, hidden behind another uniform. He’s someone who feels comfortable behind the anonymity of service he was in military service now he’s in hotel service immensely capable, practical and resourceful.

And I think in the first episode he commits he put his heart on the line and he’s broken-hearted. And that is the thing that challenges him to do something to come out behind the uniform and stand up for something more. And I had a fascinating time. I did a night as a night manager at the Rosewood Hotel in London. And it’s all theater.

Staying in hotels since then has been a different experience because everything is immaculately managed to make the guests feel welcome. Of course, if you’re doing it well, they don’t see the work, which is very like acting. But yeah that we talked about service and putting other people before yourself because that’s what the uniform demands.

You’re so good at playing the bad guy now. When you read the script do you ever feel bad? How is it to be the bad guy?

I haven’t played the bad guy for a while. I just finished “Thor Ragnarok” in which I’m Loki again, but mercifully the bad boy pants who passed on to Cate Blanchett this time around who’s playing the goddess of death, which is significantly more bad than the god of mischief, I think in the bad-boy stakes. I do think about what the film is transmitting about people and about character and recently I’ve played people who might be construed as protagonist, as opposed to antagonists.

But with Loki, specifically, who’s the most out-and-out villain I’ve played, it always try to see to be compassionate to his point of view, and that’s how I think you get an honest performance. But I understand that at the end of Avengers he has to get Hulk-Smashed, and he has to go down.

There is a photo of you and Carrie Fisher at the White House Correspondents Dinner. How did you feel when she passed away?

Carrie Fisher was such a fighter, and I spent one evening with her in Washington last summer at the White House Correspondents Dinner as a guest of The Guardian newspaper. And she had this indomitable spirit that was bigger than the occasion. She was such a force for life and I think if we could take anything a lesson from there it’s just it’s to live as fully as we can, to embrace our weaknesses and that very act makes them become strengths.

And she was so funny. She insisted that when we were there she was looking after her dog Gary, and I was looking after Gary’s rubber duck which was a rubber duck of Princess Leia. So I felt in the presence of the outgoing president of the United States, it was only appropriate that they have a Princess Leia rubber duck in train because of Carrie’s contribution.

 

Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone and the ‘La La Land’ team backstage at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards

January 9, 2017

by Carla Hay

The 74th annual Golden Globe Awards took place on January 8, 2017, at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California.

“LA LA LAND”

Golden Globe wins:

  • Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical
  • Best Director (Damien Chazelle)
  • Best Screenplay (Damien Chazelle)
  • Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical (Ryan Gosling)
  • Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical (Emma Stone)
  • Best Original Score (Justin Hurwitz)
  • Best Original Song (“City of Stars,” written by Justin Hurwitz, Justin Paul and Benj Pasek)

Here is what these Golden Globe winners said backstage in the Golden Globe Awards press room.

"La La Land" stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards
Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/NBC)

BACKSTAGE INTERVIEW

Damien, how many “no’s” did you hear before you knew “La La Land” was actually going to happen?

Damien Chazelle (writer/director): Many, but enough to fill six years. That’s how long it took to actually get the movie going. I actually have to remind myself of that. All of this is so surreal, but the biggest dream come true I had was the first day literally standing there with the cameras rolling and being surrounded by people like Emma [Stone], Ryan [Gosling] and John [Legend] and my crew. It was the biggest gift. All of this is even more surreal because of that.

Why do you think “La La Land” has become such a critical and popular success?

Ryan Gosling (co-star): I think Emma spoke to that so beautifully in her speech. The thing that moved me so much about the film is the importance of pursuing your dream, despite the obstacles. It’s such a beautiful message for Damien to put out into the world. It seemed like a very appropriate time for that.

Emma Stone (co-star): Thanks. Yeah, I think that’s maybe the key to what’s inspiring about it now. I also think that something about these two characters and what they’re going through that feels very realistic and very human, even in these fantastical circumstances where they’re singing and dancing and everything is so beautifully colorful. I think two people struggling that way and falling in love and how it ultimately unfolds is something that everybody can relate to in what could have been.

How has the modern era shaped our fantasies about love?

Gosling: I’ve had too much champagne to answer that question. Emma?

Stone: I don’t know if I can speak to the entirety of the modern era right now. But by next week, I will have a solid answer for you—with footnotes and references.

Chazelle: I don’t know if this answers the question, but it was important for us to make a love story that was for the modern era, that was a contemporary love story but use older movies and older love stories to comment on the modern era. And look at the ways the time we live in how matches the old movies in some ways and doesn’t match them in other ways.

And also this idea that one does need to move forward, that nostalgia for nostalgia’s sake is not a place to live in. You should honor the past but actually find a way to push that forward, whether it’s in how you love or how you make movies or how you make any art.

Damien, can you comment on “La La Land” setting a Golden Globes record for the most Golden Globe Awards (seven) won by a single movie or TV show? And you’re also the youngest person to ever win a Golden Globe for Best Director. How does that feel?

Chazelle: Now that you say that, it feels incredible. I’m still processing it. This is my first time ever at the Golden Globes. I assume it doesn’t always go this way. I’m not going to get used to this. I was just so honored to be here at all, so to be on the stage with the people I made this movie with. I think what I was most excited about was to see [“La La Land” composer/songwriter] Justin [Hurwitz], who I went to college with and met in a college band, and we talked about movies when we were 17 and 18, to see him on that stage [accepting his Golden Globe Award] was actually the single greatest moment for me.

Barry Jenkins, Janelle Monáe and the ‘Moonlight’ team backstage at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards

January 9, 2017

by Carla Hay

The 74th annual Golden Globe Awards took place on January 8, 2017, at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California.

“MOONLIGHT”

Golden Globe win:

  • Best Motion Picture – Drama

Here is what these Golden Globe winners said backstage in the Golden Globe Awards press room.

"Moonlight" team at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards
“Moonlight” team at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017. (Photo by Robyn Beck/Getty Images)

BACKSTAGE INTERVIEW

What did it mean to you to be able to show Miami on screen?

Barry Jenkins (writer/director): It meant the world to me. You know, the whole the whole point of this film for Tarell Alvin McCraney, the playwright, and I was to tell a very truthful story about how we grew up. And so are going to Miami to make the film because this story I think not that is universally I think is very specific, to be honest, but we could have told the story in New Orleans you could’ve told in Atlanta, Georgia, where our budget would have gone much farther than did in Florida where there’s no tax incentives.

But Tarell and I are both from Miami, so the city—kind of cliché to say it—it was a character, but it really was a character in this film and whenever people see this movie I feel like they come to Miami. They sit down with us the experience what it’s like to grow up there. And then to have all these journalists from all over the world have taken this trip to Miami and award the film is proof positive that we did the right thing by sticking to our guns and shooting in Miami.

Janelle, this film deals with one of the toughest things that some people go through in this country on being young especially African-American coming out. Can you talk about performing on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” in place of Kim Burrell, whose performance was cancelled after her anti-gay speech?

Janelle Monáe: I’m pro-love. I’ve been very supportive of love. And at the end of the day, I think that no matter where you come from and who you love, you deserve to have a right to the American Dream and to also have your story told. So I’m so thankful to be part of this true American story.

I’m thankful to be a part of a cast and a director who is pro-inclusion. And I just think that anybody who is representing hate is a part of the problem and I hope we can learn from each other and be more empathetic of one another and I hope that we can all remember the end of the day we all bleed the same color.

Why do you think people are responding “Moonlight” the way they are?

Jenkins: For me, I’m all about process and the process of making this film going back to day one on set … was about making universal film. It was about getting it right and being very specific to where we were with what the actors were giving us on the day and trying to speak truth to power in that.

And so I think in doing that I think the movie touches people because they see the authenticity that we put into it we were trying to do anything but tell our story. I think people respect that because often you try to tell a story that you believe someone is going to be willing to pay to hear. That was not our goal.

Our goal was to just speak truth as to Tarell’s experience and my experience they can doing that you can go to Katmandu or I can say I’ve been to London or Rome or Toronto will Telluride, these places so far removed, or the HFPA, the Philippines, to Russia all these different places and people respect the fact that oh no I’m not trying to make a story that relates to you in your place here right now. I think we need more that as we move into the next four years of life on this planet.

Barry, you dedicated this award to your mother. Has she seen “Moonlight” yet?

Jenkins: I think she wants to watch it on the small screen, which as a filmmaker, like no, you see it in the theater as big as possible but I think she wants to make her peace with it, woman to screen. I think she wants to engage the story on one level not in a room like this with a bunch of—I’d say for her—strangers. I do think we’ve been talking a lot more and the conversation has accelerated. I will say Naomi has given all these interviews, every interview she gives my mom watches and it.

And she has seen I think the care and thoughtfulness that they will be put into betraying her and I do think she’s getting you know I can’t rush her bit-by-bit, but she’s a step closer to I think sitting down and watching and some version you know myself and Tarell’s depiction of herself.

Do you think movies can change things socially?

Jenkins: I see what you’re saying, but … people have seen this film three times, four times, not as escapism but for realism. They want to go to the cinema and see something real reflected in all these films. No one could have anticipated that we would be sitting on the president-elect that we have coming into office in the next 12, 13 days. However, we all made these films because we felt something was lacking in the soil at the root these stories that hadn’t been told.

I don’t know if it was that these two things are coming together at the same time but we’re here now you know and we have to keep telling these stories very truthfully and honestly. And we have to give people things not to escape to this room for escapism but things they can run to reaffirm that not that all lives matter, I don’t want to step into that, but that you know what if you’re feeling something that you want to speak it? You speak it and someone there will be there to hear your truth. And I think that’s been the spirit of “Moonlight” so far.

To the actors, how specifically did you acted against each other especially in the three different acts and how each relationship was different moving forward to the story?

Mahershala Ali (co-star): Let me just say that one thing that we didn’t do was act against each other we always acted with each other. And this is the greatest joy my career.

Ashton Sanders (co-star): I agree.

Trevante Rhodes (co-star): Yeah, it was really just about sharing the moment issue in the space with beautiful people and being able to listen and react. That’s all it was and just understanding situation and understand who the person was. And trusting this man right here [he points to Jenkins].

Ashton and Trevante, you weren’t allowed to see each other during filming “Moonlight.” How important was that for the overall effect and were you surprised actually to find continuation within the characters when you saw them on screen?

Rhodes: I think it was very important because me personally I would have done any and everything I could to try and at least a little bit mimic what the younger versions were going to try and force some similarity within myself. And I think just not having to focus on that and again trusting Barry, trusting the script, trusting my idea who the person was the most important thing and allowing me to be free and to just embody the character and just leave it at that. That’s where I’m at.

Sanders: Just to back up what Travonte was saying, I think it allowed us to focus on our sections and our circumstances within our sections. Chiron is a different person having three parts of the film, so it allowed us to again focus on our circumstances and to tap into that time period of Chiron.

Can tell us how difficult it was to find the producers for “Moonlight” and how many countries has the movie been sold?

Jenkins: A24 sold the movie to—and I’ll say ballpark—20 territories internationally, which is amazing for a film set in this world featuring these characters. I will say the myth has been propagated about what a film with a cast that looks like this in a story that’s set in this world where it can show where people come out and see it. This movie has defied—I won’t say expectations—but I think those perceptions.

I made a movie in 2008 called “Medicine for Melancholy”— a very small film, $15,000 budget. And the good folks at Plan B saw that film. We started talking; nothing came of it. I think I wasn’t ready at that point. And when I had the screenplay for “Moonlight” with my first producer, Adele Romanski, who I went to film school with, the cinematographer and both editors also went to film school with me at Florida State University, we sent the script to Plan B, and they read it and immediately they said that they wanted to get involved. They had seen the first film and thought, “What can this guy  do? Look at what these people do with a larger canvas.”

And then from Plan B, they take it to A24. A24 at that point only distributed films, not finance them, but they believed in our voice so much—I’ll say Tarell’s and my voice—that they literally opened a new lane, as the kids say. And they are in their business to finance the film. It was the first film financed by A24. From there it was just like an open door. It was like, “This is the budget here and the parameters. Go out and make the film you want to make.” It was a beautiful process.

They allowed me to do the things I wanted to do. And yet they asked questions and those questions always led to answers, but they allowed me to decide when the answer has been reached. So it was a beautiful process. I feel very fortunate very privileged to have made this film with Plan B, A24 and Adele Romanski. Thank you very much. Much love to the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Viola Davis backstage at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards

January 9, 2017

by Carla Hay

The 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards took place on January 8, 2017, at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California.

VIOLA DAVIS

Golden Globe win:

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

(“Fences”)

Here is what this Golden Globe winner said backstage in the Golden Globe Awards press room.

Viola Davis at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017.
Viola Davis at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017. (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

BACKSTAGE INTERVIEW

What’s the first thing you’re going to do when you get home tonight?

I’m not going to get in my Jacuzzi because it’s going to be too late. I’m probably take a shower and maybe have another glass of Prosecco with my husband.

Where are you going to put your Golden Globe?

My husband always takes care of the trophies because after tonight, I so appreciate this, but I’ve got put the trophy away get back to work. he puts in the office on a shelf.

Can you tell us something about your communication and your team work with your husband Julius that makes you better?

I don’t know. It’s like that’s a God question. Lord knows, I don’t know what I did to deserve him walking into my life 18 years ago. I just know that it worked. I just know that it’s a great friendship. I know that when I’m down, he’s up. And when he’s down, I’m up, so we could throw each other a rope.

And now, people kind of merge our names together. I was JuliusViola. But I think probably respect—respect on the greatest level and wanting the best for him as well as him one and the best for me. I think that’s probably the truest foundation of love.

You won a Tony Award for the same role in “Fences.” Can you talk about moving the story along with your “Fences” co-star/director Denzel Washington from the stage to in front of the camera?

It felt very natural, already kind of feels like an intimate story, but not intimate in a way that’s small. I think that you know with Shakespeare or Chekov or any great writer who writes tragedies we know that they write about big emotions, about people within the confines of a family or community fighting for their lives. And it was such a joy and pleasure to have that challenge and to have August Wilson’s words and have those characters.

And like I said on the stage, very seldom does the average person get their due—especially with people of color. It’s always biopics. It’s always which is fantastic. It’s always someone who did something tremendous in life that changed the scope of our country.

But I also like the stories of the smaller people. I think that it encapsulates time. I think that it’s universal and inclusive, and that’s what August did. And all of that, it just felt like a very natural fluid movement to bring it to the screen.

In Trump’s America, how can we really be sure of the progress we’ve made all these years, in terms of racial tension, in terms of everybody still having a shot at the American Dream, and make sure we’re continuing in the right direction?

Believe it or not, I will remove Trump from the equation because I feel that it’s bigger than him. I believe that is it is our responsibility to uphold what it is to be an American. And what America is about in the true meaning of what it means to pursue the American Dream.

I think that America in and of itself has been an affirmation, but I think that we’ve fallen short a  lot because there is no way that we can have anyone in office that is not an extension of our own belief system. So then what does that say about us? And I think that if you answer that question, I think that that says it all and I know that’s very ambiguous, but thank you.

 

Aaron Taylor-Johnson backstage at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards

January 9, 2017

by Carla Hay

The 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards took place on January 8, 2017, at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California.

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON

Golden Globe win:

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

(“Nocturnal Animals”)

Here is what this Golden Globe winner said backstage in the Golden Globe Awards press room.

Aaron Taylor-Johnson at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards
Aaron Taylor-Johnson at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017. (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

BACKSTAGE INTERVIEW

What was the most challenging part of your role in “Nocturnal Animals”?

You know, every day was pretty intense and grueling. I think maybe the first day of shooting the big car sequence. Jake Gyllenhaal is a talented actor, and my role was to provoke and manipulate him and trying to get a reaction. And I think that was my challenge to give him as much material to work from, so I wanted to be as giving as possible.

What is your dream passion project?

To be working with people I enjoy working with. I love different characters, and I love to explore different genres, but it’s such a luxury to do what we do. You want to just work with the people that are also passionate and enjoy it too.

You got to briefly thank your parents in your acceptance speech right at the end. Do you want to expound on that at all?

Well yeah, I guess if I could … I started acting when I was 6 years old, so they gave me that opportunity, and I ran with it. I found my passion, and if it wasn’t for that and the fact that they … kind of encouraged me to do what I enjoy doing that I wouldn’t be here.

They just encouraged me to do what I enjoy doing. My mother would take me up and down from [where] I lived outside the city and I would get trained take about an hour and a half to get in. If I had an audition when I was young, she was there to support me and be by my side. She gave up her job to really help me do what I’m doing.

Are you wearing Tom Ford tonight? What did your parents say when they saw you play this role in “Nocturnal Animals”?

Yes, this is a Tom Ford tux. And my parents—shout out to them actually to see me because they got up at 4 a.m. They’re living in Qatar, so they’re watching on their TV screen right now, and I know they’re just extremely proud … I think they saw [“Nocturnal Animals”] at the London Film Festival, and they were just I don’t know … This is a really hard movie to watch. I think they were pulled in by the thriller, so they were moved.

The character is an extreme type of guy. A lot of people know you for starring in “Kick-Ass,” where you played a very moral character. Your character in “Nocturnal Animals” is the opposite. So how do you prepare for that?

I’m grateful for the opportunity from Tom Ford. I was perplexed why he chose me for a role like this because this is definitely something out of my comfort zone and a challenge. It was intense and grueling, and I spent three months prior to making the movie watching documentaries on serial killers or psychopaths.

And this guy was set in West Texas, so I would listen to characters from there, dialect-wise, and we kind of went from there. You know I had a lot of sleepless nights watching this material. Psychologically, it’s hard.

You sported some very serious facial hair in this role. Can you tell us the story behind that and how it affected your performance?

I remember Tom offering the job in summertime and it was about three months prior to making the movie. And he just said, “Grow your hair out, grow your beard, grow your fingernails out so that I have enough to play with. I don’t even know what I’m going to do yet but I just need to kind of be out to see what I can play with.” And that’s what he did. He got a razor out and he personally like gave me muttonchops. He took the chin off and played around, and they straightened my hair, and we started to mold this character.

Claire Foy, John Lithgow and ‘The Crown’ team backstage at the 2017 Golden Globe Awards

January 9, 2017

by Carla Hay

The 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards took place on January 8, 2017, at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California.

“THE CROWN”

Golden Globe wins:

  • Best Television Series – Drama
  • Best Actress in a Television Series – Drama (Claire Foy)

Here is what these Golden Globe winners said backstage in the Golden Globe Awards press room.

"The Crown" star Claire Foy at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017.
Claire Foy at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California, on January 8, 2017. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/NBC)

BACKSTAGE INTERVIEW

Claire, if you had a chance to sit down with Queen Elizabeth and have tea with her, what  would be one question you want to ask her now that you’ve been playing her for the television series?

Claire Foy: I’m really shamefully going to nick Andy Harris’ reply to this which is “Has she watched it?” And then probably I just like to hear her talk for about two hours that would be nice.

Peter and Stephen, what fascinated you about this and why do you think you were able to get such an amazing budget for it?

Peter Morgan (creator): We didn’t ask for that. Netflix gave it to us. I just sort of started this journey when writing the film “The Queen.” And it and even that was by accident. I started just thinking it was interesting what happened between the queen in her prime ministers. And that just grew and grew and grew.

And I wanted to know how must have been for her with her first prime minister, who was [Winston] Churchill, and the next thing I know these stories were coming back to me and I started thinking this is a much longer running thing, and now we’re shooting the second season at the moment. I hope that’s answered your question

How have you reacted to “The Crown’s” popularity? How did you pick John Lithgow to play Churchill?

Stephen Daldry (director): John is a very good person to answer the question about how on earth how surprising the response has been around the world.

Lithgow: It is astonishing. It delights all of us. We knew we were doing something fine. I think from day one, we knew this was going to be extraordinary. But we didn’t we didn’t dream that it would be massively popular internationally.

I suppose it’s because the monarchy is the subjective everybody’s attention and obsession internationally. And Peter and Stephen have just found a way of turning that very, very public family into an extremely fascinating private world ever and everybody connects with it. And you have to ask them about casting me. I didn’t do it myself.

Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos said that “The Crown” could feasibly go on six or seven years. Any thoughts on that?

Morgan: The danger of writing a story about someone with a long life is the story goes on and on … We’re filming the second season at the moment, and that would take us through to 1964. We were there for about three episodes in at the moment, and that starts in the Suez crisis and then as Britain goes into the ‘60s, the world changes you know if we leave behind a certain kind of Britain and we enter a new kind of Britain.

And we will then at the end of Season 2, we will reach a point where we will have to start thinking about a new cast because our actors would reached what I think is the limit that they could reasonably play and we haven’t had those conversations with Netflix about going forward. I think they would like to, and I think we would like to, but it’s only now really that will have those conversations

John, how difficult was it for you to master Churchill’s speech patterns and the physicality?

Lithgow: It was difficult but it was fun it was all fun and I had tremendous help from the costumer Michele Clapton and the makeup artist Ivana Primorac and a remarkable dialect coach William Conacher, who helped me with not just the dialect but the sort of machine dream of changes explosiveness that was William. And I have to say he worked just as hard with the British actors as you did with me. He was remarkable. Put all those things together, and it came very, very easily. And I think the bottom line the greatest asset of all was the lines that were written for me.

Daldry: The bottom line is that John Lithgow is one of the great actors of our age. And that we had him in our show was a great gift, and it was a wonderful opportunity for us to explore the character Churchill. We’re blessed to have you, sir.

Do you have a favorite Churchill quote or anecdote?

Lithgow: There was a wonderful moment that Stephen and I derived. We wanted to do something appalling for Churchill to demonstrate that he should not be prime minister. There was a moment when he stands up in a cabinet meeting and staggers out of the room.

And it was my idea that he actually reach right straight into his trousers. This was inspired by a quote from Churchill when someone pointed out that he’d left his fly buttons open. And his quote was, “It’s not a problem. A dead bird never leaves its nest.”