2020 Billboard Music Awards: Post Malone is the top winner

October 14, 2020

Post Malone at the 2020 Billboard Music Awards at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles (Photo by Todd Williamson/NBC)

The following is a press release from Dick Clark Productions and NBC:

Post Malone swept the “2020 Billboard Music Awards” (BBMAs), winning a total of nine awards, including Top Artist and Top Male Artist – the most of the evening – bringing his total number of BBMA wins to 10. Echoing the theme of “Music Unites All’ throughout the night Malone said “music can bring everyone together, it’s absolutely incredible.” Airing tonight from the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, the BBMAs opened with an unforgettable performance by three-time host Kelly Clarkson, who brought down the house with Whitney Houston’s version of “Higher Love,” joined by two-time BBMA nominees Pentatonix and queen of percussion Sheila E. 

Khalid followed Post Malone for the most wins of the night with five, including Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Album, and Top R&B Song. Lil Nas X and Billy Ray Cyrus tied for the third most wins, with both artists recognized for their hit “Old Town Road” in the Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song, and Top Rap Song categories. Billie Eilish took home three awards including Top New Artist and Top Female Artist. Winners in the fan-voted categories were: BTS (Top Social Artist), Shawn Mendes and Camila Cabello’s “Señorita” (Top Collaboration) and Harry Styles (Billboard Chart Achievement Award).

Rapper and social activist Killer Mike was honored with the inaugural Billboard Change Maker Award from the historic APEX (African American Panoramic Experience) Museum in Atlanta, GA. The award, which honors an artist or group that speaks truth to power through music, celebrity, and community and is active in their community and charitable with time, money, or influence to improve the lives of others, was presented by Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms. NBC and MRC teamed up to deposit $1M to Killer Mike’s recently established digital bank, Greenwood.  

Cher made an appearance on the star-studded night to present Garth Brooks with the elite ICON Award, followed by his incredible performance of multiple chart-topping hits that was nothing short of iconic.

The night was full of spectacular performances: 

  • All the way from South Korea, K-Pop supergroup BTS gave an electrifying performance of “Dynamite,” their first No. 1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
  • Demi Lovato gave a chills inducing world premiere performance of her timely and powerful new song “Commander in Chief” 
  • Post Malone delivered a soaring performance of his hits “Circles” and “Tommy Lee” featuring Tyla Yahweh, showing everyone why he took home nine awards
  • Alicia Keys made a long-awaited return to the BBMA stage for a dazzling perform of her latest single “Love Looks Better” 
  • Brandy made her BBMA performance debut and treated fans to her hit “Borderline” along with her new single “No Tomorrow” featuring Ty Dolla $ign, and “Almost Doesn’t Count” 
  • Bad Bunny was joined by surprise guests Nesi and Ivy Queen for “Yo Perreo Sola” for his dynamic and exciting BBMA performance debut
  • In her first BBMA performance, Doja Cat set the stage aflame with a dramatic medley of “Juicy,” “Say So,” and “Like That” 
  • EGOT-winner and multi-platinum singer-songwriter John Legend gave an emotional performance of “Never Break” 
  • Kane Brown, Khalid and Swae Lee tore up the stage with an energetic performance of their hit “Be Like That” 
  • In a rare appearance, Sia delivered a powerful moment with her song “Courage to Change” 
  • On the heels of one of his three wins, Luke Combs gave a moving performance of “Better Together” 
  • Breakout artist SAINt JHN, in his television debut, performed his global smash hit “Roses” 
  • And in this year’s Billboard throwback, iconic group En Vogue closed the evening with an empowering performance of their huge hit “Free Your Mind,” which first stormed the charts 30 years ago

In a tribute to legendary guitarist, musician, and songwriter Eddie Van Halen, the show featured a clip from the 2015 BBMAs when his son Wolfgang took the stage with him for a rare live tv performance. Presenters throughout the evening included Addison Rae, Cher, Garcelle Beauvais, Jane Lynch, Jay Ellis, Jharrel Jerome, Julia Michaels, Lilly Singh, Nicole Richie, Spencer X, Taraji P. Henson, TwinsthenewTrend (Fred & Tim Williams), and tWitch.

“Billboard Music Awards” nominees and winners are based on key fan interactions with music, including album and digital song sales, streaming, radio airplay, touring and social engagement, tracked by Billboard and its data partners, including MRC Data/Nielsen Music. The awards are based on the chart period of March 23, 2019, through March 14, 2020. Since 1940, the Billboard charts have been the go-to guide for ranking the popularity of artists, songs and albums, and are the ultimate measure of success in music.

The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” are sponsored by TikTok and Xfinity. The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” are produced by dick clark productions. Amy Thurlow, Mark Bracco, Barry Adelman, Linda Gierahn, Kelly Clarkson, and Robert Deaton are executive producers.

For the latest news on the Billboard Music Awards (BBMAs) visit billboardmusicawards.com and  www.billboard.com/bbma. For exclusive content and more, be sure to follow the BBMAs on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok, YouTube) and join the conversation by using the official hashtag for the show, #BBMAs.

About Dick Clark Productions:
Dick Clark Productions (DCP) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Golden Globe Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest,” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and DCP. DCP also owns one of the world’s most extensive and unique entertainment archive libraries with more than 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances, and legendary programming. DCP is part of MRC Live & Alternative, a division of diversified global entertainment company MRC. For additional information, visit www.mrcentertainment.com


Here is the complete list of nominations and winners:

*=winner

ARTIST AWARDS

Top Artist:
Billie Eilish
Jonas Brothers
Khalid
Post Malone*
Taylor Swift

Top New Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish*
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Roddy Ricch

Billboard Chart Achievement Award (Fan Voted):
Mariah Carey
Luke Combs
Lil Nas X
Harry Styles*
Taylor Swift

Top Male Artist:
DaBaby
Khalid
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*
Ed Sheeran

Top Female Artist:
Billie Eilish*
Ariana Grande
Halsey
Lizzo
Taylor Swift

Top Duo/Group:
BTS
Dan + Shay
Jonas Brothers*
Maroon 5
Panic! At The Disco

Top Billboard 200 Artist:
Drake
Billie Eilish
Khalid
Post Malone*
Taylor Swift

Top Hot 100 Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish
Khalid
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*

Top Streaming Songs Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*
Travis Scott

Top Song Sales Artist:
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Lizzo*
Post Malone
Taylor Swift

Top Radio Songs Artist:
Jonas Brothers*
Khalid
Lizzo
Shawn Mendes
Post Malone

Top Social Artist (Fan Voted):
BTS*
Billie Eilish
EXO
GOT7
Ariana Grande

Top Touring Artist:
Elton John
Metallica
P!nk*
The Rolling Stones
Ed Sheeran

Top R&B Artist:
Chris Brown
Khalid*
Lizzo
Summer Walker
The Weeknd

Top R&B Male Artist:
Chris Brown
Khalid*
The Weeknd

Top R&B Female Artist:
Beyoncé
Lizzo
Summer Walker*

Top R&B Tour:
B2K
Janet Jackson
Khalid*

Top Rap Artist:
DaBaby
Juice WRLD
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*
Roddy Ricch

Top Rap Male Artist:
DaBaby
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*

Top Rap Female Artist:
Cardi B*
City Girls
Megan Thee Stallion

Top Rap Tour:
Drake
Post Malone*
Travis Scott

Top Country Artist:
Kane Brown
Luke Combs*
Dan + Shay
Maren Morris
Thomas Rhett

Top Country Male Artist:
Kane Brown
Luke Combs*
Thomas Rhett

Top Country Female Artist:
Maren Morris*
Kacey Musgraves
Carrie Underwood

Top Country Duo/Group:
Dan + Shay*
Florida Georgia Line
Old Dominion

Top Country Tour:
Eric Church
Florida Georgia Line
George Strait*

Top Rock Artist:
Imagine Dragons
Panic! At The Disco*
Tame Impala
Tool
twenty one pilots

Top Rock Tour:
Elton John*
Metallica
The Rolling Stones

Top Latin Artist:
Anuel AA
Bad Bunny*
J Balvin
Ozuna
Romeo Santos

Top Dance/Electronic Artist:
Avicii
The Chainsmokers*
DJ Snake
Illenium
Marshmello

Top Christian Artist:
Lauren Daigle*
Elevation Worship
for KING & COUNTRY
Hillsong UNITED
Kanye West

Top Gospel Artist:
Kirk Franklin
Koryn Hawthorne
Tasha Cobbs Leonard
Sunday Service Choir
Kanye West*

ALBUM AWARDS

Top Billboard 200 Album:
Billie Eilish “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?”*
Ariana Grande “thank u, next”
Khalid “Free Spirit”
Post Malone “Hollywood’s Bleeding”
Taylor Swift “Lover”

Top Soundtrack:
“Aladdin”
“Descendants 3”
“Frozen II”*
“K-12” by Melanie Martinez 
“The Dirt” by Mötley Crüe

Top R&B Album:
Beyoncé “Homecoming: The Live Album”
Justin Bieber “Changes”
Chris Brown “Indigo”
Khalid “Free Spirit”*
Summer Walker “Over It”

Top Rap Album:
DaBaby “KIRK”
Juice WRLD “Death Race For Love”
Post Malone “Hollywood’s Bleeding”*
Roddy Ricch “Please Excuse Me for Being Antisocial”
Young Thug “So Much Fun”

Top Country Album:
Kane Brown “Experiment”
Luke Combs “What You See Is What You Get”*
Maren Morris “GIRL”
Thomas Rhett “Center Point Road”
Morgan Wallen “If I Know Me”

Top Rock Album:
The Lumineers “III”
Slipknot “We Are Not Your Kind”
Tame Impala “The Slow Rush”
Tool “Fear Inoculum”*
Vampire Weekend “Father of the Bride”

Top Latin Album:
J Balvin & Bad Bunny “Oasis”*
Farruko “Gangalee”
Maluma “11:11”
Romeo Santos “Utopía”
Sech “Sueños”

Top Dance/Electronic Album:
Avicii “TIM”
The Chainsmokers “World War Joy”
Illenium “Ascend”
Marshmello “Marshmello: Fortnite Extended Set”*
Alan Walker “Different World”

Top Christian Album:
Bethel Music “Victory: Recorded Live”
Casting Crowns “Only Jesus”
Hillsong UNITED “People”
Skillet “Victorious”
Kanye West “Jesus is King”*

Top Gospel AlbumL
Kirk Franklin “Long Live Love”
Donald Lawrence & The Tri-City Singers “Goshen”
William McDowell “The Cry: A Live Worship Experience”
Sunday Service Choir “Jesus Is Born”
Kanye West “Jesus is King”*

SONG AWARDS

Top Hot 100 Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello “Señorita”

Top Streaming Song:
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lil Tecca “Ran$om”
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”

Top Selling Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Blake Shelton “God’s Country”

Top Radio Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Jonas Brothers “Sucker”*
Khalid “Talk”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Ed Sheeran & Justin Bieber “I Don’t Care”

Top Collaboration (Fan Voted):
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”
Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello “Señorita”*
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”
Ed Sheeran & Justin Bieber “I Don’t Care”

Top R&B Song:
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Doja Cat & Tyga “Juicy”
Khalid “Talk”*
Lizzo “Good As Hell”
The Weeknd “Heartless”

Top Rap Song:
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lil Tecca “Ran$om”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”
Post Malone “Wow.”

Top Country Song:
Dan + Shay with Justin Bieber “10,000 Hours”*
Maren Morris “The Bones”
Old Dominion “One Man Band”
Blake Shelton “God’s Country”
Morgan Wallen “Whiskey Glasses”

Top Rock Song:
Imagine Dragons “Bad Liar”
Machine Gun Kelly x YUNGBLUD x Travis Barker “I Think I’m Okay”
Panic! At The Disco “Hey Look Ma, I Made It”*
twenty one pilots “Chlorine”
twenty one pilots “The Hype”

Top Latin Song:
Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Karol G, Ozuna & J Balvin “China”
Bad Bunny & Tainy “Callaita”
Daddy Yankee ft. Snow “Con Calma”*
Jhay Cortez, J Balvin, & Bad Bunny “No Me Conoce”
Sech ft. Darell, Nicky Jam, Ozuna, Anuel AA “Otro Trago”

Top Dance/Electronic Song:
Black Eyed Peas x J Balvin “Ritmo (Bad Boys For Life)”
Ellie Goulding x Diplo ft. Swae Lee “Close To Me”*
Illenium & Jon Bellion “Good Things Fall Apart”
Kygo x Whitney Houston “Higher Love”
Marshmello ft. CHVRCHES “Here With Me”

Top Christian Song:
Bethel Music, Jonathan David Helser & Melissa Helser “Raise A Hallelujah”
Casting Crowns ft. Matthew West “Nobody”
Lauren Daigle “Rescue”
for KING & COUNTRY “God Only Knows”*
Kanye West “Follow God”

Top Gospel Song:
Kirk Franklin “Love Theory”
Kanye West “Closed on Sunday”
Kanye West “Follow God”*
Kanye West “On God”
Kanye West “Selah”

2020 Billboard Music Awards: Post Malone is the top nominee

September 22, 2020

Post Malone (Photo courtesy of ABC/Image Group LA) 

The following is a press release from Dick Clark Productions and NBC:

Dick Clark Productions and NBC today announced the nominees for the “2020 Billboard Music Awards,” which honor the year’s most successful artists in 55 categories across all genres of music. Rapper Post Malone leads the pack with 16 Billboard Music Award (BBMA) nods, followed by first-time nominees Lil Nas X with 13 and Billie Eilish with 12. BBMA winner Khalid ties Eilish with 12 nominations. Other nominees and possible record-breakers include first-time nominee Lizzo (11), KanyeWest (9), TaylorSwift (6), and JustinBieber (4).

The “2020 Billboard Music Awards,” hosted by Kelly Clarkson, will broadcast live from The Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. ET on NBC.

This year’s awards are based on the chart period of March 23, 2019 through March 14, 2020, set for the originally scheduled April 29, 2020 show, which was postponed due to the pandemic. The original eligibility period will remain intact to recognize and honor the chart-topping artists and musical successes achieved and to maintain consistent tracking periods for future shows. 

Post Malone earned nominations in coveted categories including Top Artist, Top Male Artist and Top Billboard 200 Artist, notching a total of 16 nods and only narrowly missing his personal record of 17 nominations in 2019. He is also a double nominee in the Top Rap Song category. Lil Nas X received 13 nominations, with nods in many of the same categories, including Top Male Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist and Top Hot 100 Artist. Khalid and Billie Eilish are tied for third-most nominations this year with 12 each, marking Eilish’s BBMA nominations debut. Lizzo received a total of 11 nominations, including Top New Artist, and Kanye West follows with 9, including a quadruple nomination in the Top Gospel Song category. 

Fan-voted categories this year include Billboard Chart Achievement Award, Top Social Artist and Top Collaboration. Voting opens on October 1, 2020 and will be available on TikTok, this year’s primary voting platform, reflecting its increasing impact on music and role as a staging ground for chart-topping hits.

2020 TOP FIVE NOMINEE CHART FACTS:

Post Malone (16) Billboard Music Award-winner Post Malone continues to dominate Billboard’s charts, thanks in large part to the smash success of his 2019 album Hollywood’s Bleeding. The set debuted atop the Billboard 200 chart and never left the weekly top 20 in its entire first year of release. The album was so hot, it generated more streams than any other album in the U.S. in 2019, with over 3 billion audio on-demand streams earned for its songs that year according to Nielsen Music/MRC Data. Hollywood’s Bleeding houses five top 10 songs on the Billboard Hot 100, including the No. 1s “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider Verse)” and “Circles,” with both proving to be so popular, they each spent more than a year on the tally. “Circles” was such a sustained hit, while it first hit No. 1 on the Hot 100 in November of 2019, it lingered in the weekly top 10 on the Hot 100 until May of 2020, logging a record-setting 39 total weeks in the top 10.

Lil Nas X (13) Lil Nas X made quite an impression with his debut hit “Old Town Road,” as the track broke the record for the most weeks at No. 1 ever on the Hot 100 chart. The tune, enhanced by a remix featuring Billy Ray Cyrus, shattered the long-standing record for the most weeks atop the chart in its 60-plus-year history, spending 19 weeks at No. 1 in 2019. It surpassed the previous record-holders, Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee’s “Despacito,” featuring Justin Bieber, and Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men’s “One Sweet Day,” each with 16 weeks at No. 1. Lil Nas X followed up his success with two more top 40 hits on the Hot 100: “Panini” and “Rodeo.” He also launched his debut EP 7, which bowed at No. 1 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart.

Billie Eilish (12) More than a year after Billie Eilish debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 with her album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, the album has yet to leave the weekly top 40. The set has spent a total of three nonconsecutive weeks at No. 1 on the list, and spun off Eilish’s first Hot 100 No. 1 single, “Bad Guy.” She closed out 2019 with another top 10 hit, “Everything I Wanted” (peaking at No. 8) and then got 2020 off to a fine start with the latest James Bond film theme song, “No Time to Die” (No. 16), from the upcoming film of the same name. In early 2020, Eilish tied Beck and Alanis Morissette for the most No. 1s on the Alternative Songs airplay chart, when “Everything I Wanted” became her third leader on the tally.  

Khalid (12) 2018’s Billboard Music Award winner for top new artist celebrated his first No. 1 album on the Billboard 200 in 2019 with Free Spirit, and its top five-charting Hot 100 hit “Talk.” Free Spirit also ruled the Top R&B Albums chart for 12 weeks, and never left the weekly top 10 of the list from its debut in April of 2019 on through the first half of 2020. Further, upon the debut of Free Spirit, Khalid dominated that week’s Hot R&B Songs chart, placing 16 songs on the 25-position tally – including the entire top five.

Lizzo (11 ) In 2019, Lizzo’s barnstorming single “Truth Hurts” ruled the Billboard Hot 100 chart for seven weeks, while it spent 11 weeks atop the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. The success of the track helped its parent album Cuz I Love You reach the top five on the Billboard 200 albums chart. She followed “Truth” with another smash, “Good as Hell,” which topped out at No. 3 on the Hot 100 and No. 1 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.

Kanye West (9) Five-time Billboard Music Award winner Kanye West has been a consistent chart topper for years, having earned eight consecutive No. 1 albums on the Billboard 200 chart between 2005 and 2018. In 2019, West garnered yet another No. 1 on the all-genre Billboard 200 with Jesus Is King, and also his first No. 1 on the Top Gospel Albums and Top Christian Albums chart. The effort also snared West a top 10 hit on the Hot 100 with “Follow God,” which has spent 37 weeks at No. 1 on the Hot Gospel Songs chart.

“Billboard Music Awards” nominees and winners are based on key fan interactions with music, including album and digital song sales, streaming, radio airplay, touring and social engagement, tracked by Billboard and its data partners, including MRC Data/Nielsen Music. Since 1940, the Billboard charts have been the go-to guide for ranking the popularity of artists, songs and albums, and are the ultimate measure of success in music.

The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” is produced by Dick Clark Productions. Amy Thurlow, Mark Bracco, Barry Adelman, Linda Gierahn, Kelly Clarkson and Robert Deaton are executive producers.

For the latest news on the Billboard Music Awards (BBMAs) visit billboardmusicawards.com and  www.billboard.com/bbma. For exclusive content and more, be sure to follow the BBMAs on social media and join the conversation by using the official hashtag for the show, #BBMAs. 

Twitter:@BBMAs | FacebookFB.com/TheBBMAs | Instagram@bbmas
Snapchatthebbmas | TikTok: @bbmas | YouTubeyoutube.com/bbmas
About dick clark productions:

Dick Clark Productions (DCP) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Golden Globe Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and DCP. DCP also owns one of the world’s most extensive and unique entertainment archive libraries with more than 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances and legendary programming. dcp is part of MRC Live & Alternative, a division of diversified global entertainment company MRC. For additional information, visit www.mrcentertainment.com

THE “2020 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS” NOMINEES:

NOMINATIONS BY CATEGORY

ARTIST AWARDS

Top Artist:
Billie Eilish
Jonas Brothers
Khalid
Post Malone
Taylor Swift

Top New Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Roddy Ricch

Billboard Chart Achievement Award (Fan Voted):
Mariah Carey
Luke Combs
Lil Nas X
Harry Styles
Taylor Swift

Top Male Artist:
DaBaby
Khalid
Lil Nas X
Post Malone
Ed Sheeran

Top Female Artist:
Billie Eilish
Ariana Grande
Halsey
Lizzo
Taylor Swift

Top Duo/Group:
BTS
Dan + Shay
Jonas Brothers
Maroon 5
Panic! At The Disco

Top Billboard 200 Artist:
Drake
Billie Eilish
Khalid
Post Malone
Taylor Swift

Top Hot 100 Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish
Khalid
Lil Nas X
Post Malone

Top Streaming Songs Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Post Malone
Travis Scott

Top Song Sales Artist:
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Post Malone
Taylor Swift

Top Radio Songs Artist:
Jonas Brothers
Khalid
Lizzo
Shawn Mendes
Post Malone

Top Social Artist (Fan Voted):
BTS
Billie Eilish
EXO
GOT7
Ariana Grande

Top Touring Artist:
Elton John
Metallica
P!nk
The Rolling Stones
Ed Sheeran

Top R&B Artist:
Chris Brown
Khalid
Lizzo
Summer Walker
The Weeknd

Top R&B Male Artist:
Chris Brown
Khalid
The Weeknd

Top R&B Female Artist:
Beyoncé
Lizzo
Summer Walker

Top R&B Tour:
B2K
Janet Jackson
Khalid

Top Rap Artist:
DaBaby
Juice WRLD
Lil Nas X
Post Malone
Roddy Ricch

Top Rap Male Artist:
DaBaby
Lil Nas X
Post Malone

Top Rap Female Artist:
Cardi B
City Girls
Megan Thee Stallion

Top Rap Tour:
Drake
Post Malone
Travis Scott

Top Country Artist:
Kane Brown
Luke Combs
Dan + Shay
Maren Morris
Thomas Rhett

Top Country Male Artist:
Kane Brown
Luke Combs
Thomas Rhett

Top Country Female Artist:
Maren Morris
Kacey Musgraves
Carrie Underwood

Top Country Duo/Group:
Dan + Shay
Florida Georgia Line
Old Dominion

Top Country Tour:
Eric Church
Florida Georgia Line
George Strait

Top Rock Artist:
Imagine Dragons
Panic! At The Disco
Tame Impala
Tool
twenty one pilots

Top Rock Tour:
Elton John
Metallica
The Rolling Stones

Top Latin Artist:
Anuel AA
Bad Bunny
J Balvin
Ozuna
Romeo Santos

Top Dance/Electronic Artist:
Avicii
The Chainsmokers
DJ Snake
Illenium
Marshmello

Top Christian Artist:
Lauren Daigle
Elevation Worship
for KING & COUNTRY
Hillsong UNITED
Kanye West

Top Gospel Artist:
Kirk Franklin
Koryn Hawthorne
Tasha Cobbs Leonard
Sunday Service Choir
Kanye West

ALBUM AWARDS

Top Billboard 200 Album:
Billie Eilish “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?”
Ariana Grande “thank u, next”
Khalid “Free Spirit”
Post Malone “Hollywood’s Bleeding”
Taylor Swift “Lover”

Top Soundtrack:
“Aladdin”
“Descendants 3”
“Frozen II”
“K-12” by Melanie Martinez 
“The Dirt” by Mötley Crüe

Top R&B Album:
Beyoncé “Homecoming: The Live Album”
Justin Bieber “Changes”
Chris Brown “Indigo”
Khalid “Free Spirit”
Summer Walker “Over It”

Top Rap Album:
DaBaby “KIRK”
Juice WRLD “Death Race For Love”
Post Malone “Hollywood’s Bleeding”
Roddy Ricch “Please Excuse Me for Being Antisocial”
Young Thug “So Much Fun”

Top Country Album:
Kane Brown “Experiment”
Luke Combs “What You See Is What You Get”
Maren Morris “GIRL”
Thomas Rhett “Center Point Road”
Morgan Wallen “If I Know Me”

Top Rock Album:
The Lumineers “III”
Slipknot “We Are Not Your Kind”
Tame Impala “The Slow Rush”
Tool “Fear Inoculum”
Vampire Weekend “Father of the Bride”

Top Latin Album:
J Balvin & Bad Bunny “Oasis”
Farruko “Gangalee”
Maluma “11:11”
Romeo Santos “Utopía”
Sech “Sueños”

Top Dance/Electronic Album:
Avicii “TIM”
The Chainsmokers “World War Joy”
Illenium “Ascend”
Marshmello “Marshmello: Fortnite Extended Set”
Alan Walker “Different World”

Top Christian Album:
Bethel Music “Victory: Recorded Live”
Casting Crowns “Only Jesus”
Hillsong UNITED “People”
Skillet “Victorious”
Kanye West “Jesus is King”

Top Gospel AlbumL
Kirk Franklin “Long Live Love”
Donald Lawrence & The Tri-City Singers “Goshen”
William McDowell “The Cry: A Live Worship Experience”
Sunday Service Choir “Jesus Is Born”
Kanye West “Jesus is King”

SONG AWARDS

Top Hot 100 Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello “Señorita”

Top Streaming Song:
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”
Lil Tecca “Ran$om”
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”

Top Selling Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Blake Shelton “God’s Country”

Top Radio Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Jonas Brothers “Sucker”
Khalid “Talk”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Ed Sheeran & Justin Bieber “I Don’t Care”

Top Collaboration (Fan Voted):
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”
Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello “Señorita”
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”
Ed Sheeran & Justin Bieber “I Don’t Care”

Top R&B Song:
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Doja Cat & Tyga “Juicy”
Khalid “Talk”
Lizzo “Good As Hell”
The Weeknd “Heartless”

Top Rap Song:
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”
Lil Tecca “Ran$om”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”
Post Malone “Wow.”

Top Country Song:
Dan + Shay with Justin Bieber “10,000 Hours”
Maren Morris “The Bones”
Old Dominion “One Man Band”
Blake Shelton “God’s Country”
Morgan Wallen “Whiskey Glasses”

Top Rock Song:
Imagine Dragons “Bad Liar”
Machine Gun Kelly x YUNGBLUD x Travis Barker “I Think I’m Okay”
Panic! At The Disco “Hey Look Ma, I Made It”
twenty one pilots “Chlorine”
twenty one pilots “The Hype”

Top Latin Song:
Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Karol G, Ozuna & J Balvin “China”
Bad Bunny & Tainy “Callaita”
Daddy Yankee ft. Snow “Con Calma”
Jhay Cortez, J Balvin, & Bad Bunny “No Me Conoce”
Sech ft. Darell, Nicky Jam, Ozuna, Anuel AA “Otro Trago”

Top Dance/Electronic Song:
Black Eyed Peas x J Balvin “Ritmo (Bad Boys For Life)”
Ellie Goulding x Diplo ft. Swae Lee “Close To Me”
Illenium & Jon Bellion “Good Things Fall Apart”
Kygo x Whitney Houston “Higher Love”
Marshmello ft. CHVRCHES “Here With Me”

Top Christian Song:
Bethel Music, Jonathan David Helser & Melissa Helser “Raise A Hallelujah”
Casting Crowns ft. Matthew West “Nobody”
Lauren Daigle “Rescue”
for KING & COUNTRY “God Only Knows”
Kanye West “Follow God”

Top Gospel Song:
Kirk Franklin “Love Theory”
Kanye West “Closed on Sunday”
Kanye West “Follow God”
Kanye West “On God”
Kanye West “Selah”

NOMINATIONS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER (BY FIRST NAME):

“Aladdin” (1): Top Soundtrack
Alan Walker (1): Top Dance/Electronic Album
Anuel AA (3): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Song (x2)
Ariana Grande (3): Top Female Artist, Top Social Artist, Top Billboard 200 Album
Avicii (2): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album
B2K (1): Top R&B Tour
Bad Bunny (4): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Album, Top Latin Song (x2)
Bethel Music (2): Top Christian Album, Top Christian Song
Beyoncé (2): Top R&B Female Artist, Top R&B Album
Billie Eilish (12): Top Artist, Top New Artist, Top Female Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Social Artist, Top Billboard 200 Album, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song
Billy Ray Cyrus (5): Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song
Black Eyed Peas (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song
Blake Shelton (2): Top Selling Song, Top Country Song
BTS (2): Top Duo/Group, Top Social Artist
Camila Cabello (2): Top Hot 100 Song, Top Collaboration
Cardi B (1): Top Rap Female Artist
Carrie Underwood (1): Top Country Female Artist
Casting Crowns (2): Top Christian Album, Top Christian Song
Chris Brown (6): Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Male Artist, Top R&B Album, Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration, Top R&B Song
CHVRCHES (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song
City Girls (1): Top Rap Female Artist
DaBaby (7): Top New Artist, Top Male Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Male Artist, Top Rap Album
Daddy Yankee (2): Top Latin Song (x2)
Dan + Shay (4): Top Duo/Group, Top Country Artist, Top Country Duo/Group, Top Country Song
Darell (1): Top Latin Song
“Descendants 3” (1): Top Soundtrack
Diplo (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song
DJ Snake (1): Top Dance/Electronic Artist
Doja Cat (1): Top R&B Song
Donald Lawrence (1): Top Gospel Album
Drake (5): Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Rap Tour, Top R&B Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration
Ed Sheeran (4): Top Male Artist, Top Touring Artist, Top Radio Song, Top Collaboration
Elevation Worship (1): Top Christian Artist
Ellie Goulding (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song
Elton John (2): Top Touring Artist, Top Rock Tour
Eric Church (1): Top Country Tour
EXO (1): Top Social Artist
Farruko (1): Top Latin Album
Florida Georgia Line (2): Top Country Duo/Group, Top Country Tour
for KING & COUNTRY (2): Top Christian Artist, Top Christian Song
“Frozen II” (1): Top Soundtrack
George Strait (1): Top Country Tour
GOT7 (1): Top Social Artist
Halsey (1): Top Female Artist
Harry Styles (1): Billboard Chart Achievement Award
Hillsong UNITED (2): Top Christian Artist, Top Christian Album
Illenium (3): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album, Top Dance/Electronic Song
Imagine Dragons (2): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Song
J Balvin (5):  Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Album, Top Latin Song (x2), Top Dance/Electronic Song
Janet Jackson (1): Top R&B Tour
Jhay Cortez (1): Top Latin Song
Jon Bellion (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song
Jonas Brothers (4): Top Artist, Top Duo/Group, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top Radio Song
Jonathan David Helser (1): Top Christian Song
Juice WRLD (2): Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Album
Justin Bieber (4): Top R&B Album, Top Radio Song, Top Collaboration, Top Country Song
Kacey Musgraves (1): Top Country Female Artist
Kane Brown (3): Top Country Artist, Top Country Male Artist, Top Country Album
Kanye West (9): Top Christian Artist, Top Gospel Artist, Top Christian Album, Top Gospel Album, Top Christian Song, Top Gospel Song (x4)
Karol G (1): Top Latin Song
Khalid (12): Top Artist, Top Male Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Male Artist, Top R&B Tour, Top Billboard 200 Album, Top R&B Album, Top Radio Song, Top R&B Song
Kirk Franklin (3): Top Gospel Artist, Top Gospel Album, Top Gospel Song
Koryn Hawthorne (1): Top Gospel Artist
Kygo (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song
Lauren Daigle (2): Top Christian Artist, Top Christian Song
Lewis Capaldi (3): Top Hot 100 Song, Top Selling Song, Top Radio Song
Lil Nas X (13): Top New Artist, Billboard Chart Achievement Award, Top Male Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Male Artist, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song, Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song
Lil Tecca (2): Top Streaming Song, Top Rap Song
Lizzo (11): Top New Artist, Top Female Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Female Artist, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Selling Song, Top Radio Song, Top R&B Song, Top Rap Song
Luke Combs (4): Top Country Artist, Top Country Male Artist, Top Country Album, Billboard Chart Achievement Award
Machine Gun Kelly (1): Top Rock Song
Maluma (1): Top Latin Album
Maren Morris (4): Top Country Artist, Top Country Female Artist, Top Country Album, Top Country Song
Mariah Carey (1): Billboard Chart Achievement Award
Maroon 5 (1): Top Duo/Group
Marshmello (3): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album, Top Dance/Electronic Song
Matthew West (1): Top Christian Song
Megan Thee Stallion (1): Top Rap Female Artist
Melanie Martinez (1): Top Soundtrack
Melissa Helser (1): Top Christian Song
Metallica (2): Top Touring Artist, Top Rock Tour
Morgan Wallen (2): Top Country Album, Top Country Song
Mötley Crüe (1): Top Soundtrack
Nicky Jam (1): Top Latin Song
Old Dominion (2): Top Country Duo/Group, Top Country Song
Ozuna (3): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Song (x2)
P!nk (1): Top Touring Artist
Panic! At The Disco (3): Top Duo/Group, Top Rock Song, Top Rock Artist
Post Malone (16): Top Artist, Top Male Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Male Artist, Top Rap Tour, Top Billboard 200 Album, Top Rap Album, Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song (x2)
Roddy Ricch (3): Top New Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Album
Romeo Santos (2): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Album
Sech (2): Top Latin Album, Top Latin Song
Shawn Mendes (3): Top Radio Songs Artist, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Collaboration
Skillet (1): Top Christian Album
Slipknot (1): Top Rock Album
Snow (1): Top Latin Song
Summer Walker (3): Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Female Artist, Top R&B Album
Sunday Service Choir (2): Top Gospel Artist, Top Gospel Album
Swae Lee (4): Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song, Top Dance/Electronic Song
Tame Impala (2): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Album
Tasha Cobbs Leonard (1): Top Gospel Artist
Tainy (1): Top Latin Song
Taylor Swift (6): Top Artist, Billboard Chart Achievement Award, Top Female Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Billboard 200 Album           
The Chainsmokers (2): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album
The Lumineers (1): Top Rock Album
The Rolling Stones (2): Top Touring Artist, Top Rock Tour
The Weeknd (3): Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Male Artist, Top R&B Song
Thomas Rhett (3): Top Country Artist, Top Country Male Artist, Top Country Album
Tool (2): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Album
Travis Barker (1): Top Rock Song
Travis Scott (2): Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Rap Tour
twenty one pilots (3): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Song (x2)
Tyga (1): Top R&B song
Vampire Weekend (1): Top Rock Album
Whitney Houston (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song
William McDowell (1): Top Gospel Album
Young Thug (1): Top Rap Album
YUNGBLUD (1): Top Rock Song


NOMINATIONS BY NUMERICAL ORDER:

Post Malone (16): Top Artist, Top Male Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Male Artist, Top Rap Tour, Top Billboard 200 Album, Top Rap Album, Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song (x2)
Lil Nas X (13): Top New Artist, Billboard Chart Achievement Award, Top Male Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Male Artist, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song, Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song                                             
Billie Eilish (12): Top Artist, Top New Artist, Top Female Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Social Artist, Top Billboard 200 Album, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song                                                      
Khalid (12): Top Artist, Top Male Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Male Artist, Top R&B Tour, Top Billboard 200 Album, Top R&B Album, Top Radio Song, Top R&B Song                                                         
Lizzo (11): Top New Artist, Top Female Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Female Artist, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Selling Song, Top Radio Song, Top R&B Song, Top Rap Son         
Kanye West (9): Top Christian Artist, Top Gospel Artist, Top Christian Album, Top Gospel Album, Top Christian Song, Top Gospel Song (x4)                                  
DaBaby (7): Top New Artist, Top Male Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Male Artist, Top Rap Album            
Chris Brown (6): Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Male Artist, Top R&B Album, Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration, Top R&B Song                            
Taylor Swift (6): Top Artist, Billboard Chart Achievement Award, Top Female Artist, Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Song Sales Artist, Top Billboard 200 Album
Billy Ray Cyrus (5): Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song   
Drake (5): Top Billboard 200 Artist, Top Rap Tour, Top R&B Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration
J Balvin (5): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Album, Top Latin Song (x2), Top Dance/Electronic Song    
Bad Bunny (4): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Album, Top Latin Song (x2)     
Dan + Shay (4): Top Duo/Group, Top Country Artist, Top Country Duo/Group, Top Country Song             
Ed Sheeran (4): Top Male Artist, Top Touring Artist, Top Radio Song, Top Collaboration
Jonas Brothers (4): Top Artist, Top Duo/Group, Top Radio Songs Artist, Top Radio Song  
Justin Bieber (4): Top R&B Album, Top Radio Song, Top Collaboration, Top Country Song
Luke Combs (4): Top Country Artist, Top Country Male Artist, Top Country Album Billboard Chart Achievement Award
Maren Morris   (4): Top Country Artist, Top Country Female Artist, Top Country Album, Top Country Song
Swae Lee (4): Top Streaming Song, Top Collaboration, Top Rap Song, Top Dance/Electronic Song
Anuel AA (3): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Song (x2)                                         
Ariana Grande (3): Top Female Artist, Top Social Artist, Top Billboard 200 Album           
Illenium (3): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album, Top Dance/Electronic Song
Kane Brown (3): Top Country Artist, Top Country Male Artist, Top Country Album
Kirk Franklin (3): Top Gospel Artist, Top Gospel Album, Top Gospel Song
Lewis Capaldi (3): Top Hot 100 Song, Top Selling Song, Top Radio Song                         
Marshmello (3): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album, Top Dance/Electronic Song 
Ozuna (3): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Song (x2)                                                 
Panic! At The Disco (3): Top Duo/Group, Top Rock Song, Top Rock Artist
Roddy Ricch (3): Top New Artist, Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Album  
Shawn Mendes (3): Top Radio Songs Artist, Top Hot 100 Song, Top Collaboration   
Summer Walker (3): Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Female Artist, Top R&B Album              
The Weeknd (3): Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Male Artist, Top R&B Song
Thomas Rhett (3): Top Country Artist, Top Country Male Artist, Top Country Album          
twenty one pilots (3): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Song (x2)
Avicii (2): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album
Blake Shelton (2): Top Selling Song, Top Country Song                               
Bethel Music    (2): Top Christian Album, Top Christian Song                         
Beyoncé (2): Top R&B Female Artist, Top R&B Album                                          
BTS (2): Top Duo/Group, Top Social Artist                                                                 
Camila Cabello (2): Top Hot 100 Song, Top Collaboration                                               
Casting Crowns (2): Top Christian Album, Top Christian Song     
Daddy Yankee (2): Top Latin Song (x2)
Elton John (2): Top Touring Artist, Top Rock Tour                                              
Florida Georgia Line (2): Top Country Duo/Group, Top Country Tour
for KING & COUNTRY (2): Top Christian Artist, Top Christian Song                  
Hillsong UNITED (2): Top Christian Artist, Top Christian Album                                       
Imagine Dragons (2): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Song                
Juice WRLD (2): Top Rap Artist, Top Rap Album             
Lauren Daigle (2): Top Christian Artist, Top Christian Song         
Lil Tecca (2): Top Streaming Song, Top Rap Song                                                
Metallica (2): Top Touring Artist, Top Rock Tour                                                   
Morgan Wallen (2): Top Country Album, Top Country Song                                       
Old Dominion (2): Top Country Duo/Group, Top Country Song                               
Romeo Santos (2): Top Latin Artist, Top Latin Album                 
Sech (2): Top Latin Album, Top Latin Song                                                          
Sunday Service Choir (2): Top Gospel Artist, Top Gospel Album  
Tame Impala (2): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Album 
The Chainsmokers (2): Top Dance/Electronic Artist, Top Dance/Electronic Album                                    
The Rolling Stones (2): Top Touring Artist, Top Rock Tour
Tool (2): Top Rock Artist, Top Rock Album                                                              
Travis Scott (2): Top Streaming Songs Artist, Top Rap Tour                                             
“Aladdin”(1): Top Soundtrack                                                                     
Alan Walker (1): Top Dance/Electronic Album                                                                  
B2K (1): Top R&B Tour                                                                                                 
Black Eyed Peas (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song                                                             
Cardi B (1): Top Rap Female Artist                                                                         
Carrie Underwood (1): Top Country Female Artist                                           
CHVRCHES (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song                                                               
City Girls (1): Top Rap Female Artist                                                 
Darell (1): Top Latin Song                                                                          
“Descendants 3” (1): Top Soundtrack   
Diplo (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song                                                                    
DJ Snake (1): Top Dance/Electronic Artist                                                                
Doja Cat (1): Top R&B Song
Donald Lawrence (1): Top Gospel Album                                                                      
Elevation Worship (1): Top Christian Artist                                                         
Ellie Goulding (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song                                                               
Eric Church (1): Top Country Tour                                                                         
EXO (1): Top Social Artist                                                                                              
Farruko (1): Top Latin Album                                                                        
“Frozen II” (1): Top Soundtrack 
George Strait (1): Top Country Tour                                                                              
GOT7 (1): Top Social Artist                                                                               
Halsey (1): Top Female Artist                                                                                           
Harry Styles (1): Billboard Chart Achievement Award                                               
Janet Jackson (1): Top R&B Tour                                                                          
Jhay Cortez (1): Top Latin Song                                                                                     
Jon Bellion (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song                                                                   
Jonathan David Helser (1): Top Christian Song                                                     
Kacey Musgraves (1): Top Country Female Artist                                                   
Karol G (1): Top Latin Song                                                                                
Koryn Hawthorne (1): Top Gospel Artist                                                                             
Kygo (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song                                                                             
Machine Gun Kelly (1): Top Rock Song                                                                          
Maluma (1): Top Latin Album                                                                              
Mariah Carey (1): Billboard Chart Achievement Award                                                  
Maroon 5 (1): Top Duo/Group                                                                                           
Matthew West (1): Top Christian Song                                                                         
Megan Thee Stallion (1): Top Rap Female Artist                                                            
Melanie Martinez (1): Top Soundtrack                                                                          
Melissa Helser (1): Top Christian Song                                                                          
Mötley Crüe (1): Top Soundtrack                                                                         
Nicky Jam (1): Top Latin Song                                                                                            
P!nk (1): Top Touring Artist                                                          
Skillet (1): Top Christian Album                                                                                     
Slipknot (1): Top Rock Album                                                                                
Snow (1): Top Latin Song                                                                                                   
Tainy (1): Top Latin Song
Tasha Cobbs Leonard (1): Top Gospel Artist      
The Lumineers (1): Top Rock Album                                                                     
Travis Barker (1): Top Rock Song                                                                                 
Tyga (1): Top R&B SongVampire Weekend (1): Top Rock Album                                                                        
Whitney Houston (1): Top Dance/Electronic Song             
William McDowell (1): Top Gospel Album                         
Young Thug (1): Top Rap Album                                                                        
YUNGBLUD (1): Top Rock Song       

2020 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARD NOMINEE STATISTICS 

• 2020 NOMINATIONS FAST FACTS 
• ALL-TIME RECORD HOLDERS BY CATEGORY 
• TOP BBMA WINNERS OF ALL TIME (1990–2019) 


2020 NOMINATIONS FAST FACTS 

“POST MALONE LEADS WITH 16 NOMINATIONS, THE MOST OF ANY ARTIST THIS YEAR” 

  • In addition to receiving the most nominations (16), rapper/singer/songwriter Post Malone is also nominated in more categories than any other artist this year (15), including Top Artist, Top Male Artist and Top Hot 100 Artist. He is nominated twice in the Top Rap Song category with “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)” and “Wow.” 

“IF POST MALONE SWEEPS IN ALL HIS CATEGORIES, HE WILL TIE WITH WHITNEY HOUSTON FOR 16 TOTAL WINS AND SURPASS MARIAH CAREY AND BEYONCE” 

  • 2018 Billboard Music Award winner for Top Rap Song, Post Malone, could tie with Whitney Houston for total wins of all time (16) if he takes home the trophies in all his categories this year. Drake still holds the record for most wins of all time (27), followed by Taylor Swift (23). 

“POST MALONE COULD BREAK DRAKE’S RECORD FOR MOST WINS IN A SINGLE NIGHT”

  • Post Malone leads for the most nominations this year (16), followed by Lil Nas X (13). Both artists have the chance to surpass or tie Drake’s 2017 record (13) for the artist with the most wins in a single night.

“TAYLOR SWIFT COULD BREAK DRAKE’S RECORDFOR MOST WINS BY ANY ARTIST OF ALL TIME”

  • Taylor Swift is nominated in six categories this year. If she wins in at least 5 of these categories, she could break Drake’s record for most wins by any artist of all time (27).  

“KANYE WEST COULD WIN HIS FIRST BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARD IN A GOSPEL AND/OR CHRISTIAN CATEGORY. HE ALSO EARNED 4 NOMINATIONS WITHIN A SINGLE CATEGORY — TOP GOSPEL SONG”

  • Kanye West has the sixth-most nominations this year (9) with first-time nominations in the Christian and Gospel categories, including Top Christian Artist, Top Gospel Artist, Top Christian Album, Top Gospel Album, Top Christian Song and 4 nominations within the Top Gospel Song category. He is also up against his own Sunday Service Choir for Top Gospel Artist.

“BILLIE EILISH, LIL NAS X, LIZZO, HARRY STYLES AND JONAS BROTHERS COULD WIN THEIR FIRST-EVER BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARD THIS YEAR AS FIRST-TIME NOMINEES” 

  • Billie Eilish scored the third-most nominations with 12, including Top Artist, Top New Artist, Top Female Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist and Top Selling Song. She could receive her first-ever Billboard Music Award at this year’s show.
  • Lil Nas X is a first-time nominee and racked up the second-most nominations with 13, including Top New Artist, Top Male Artist, Top Hot 100 Artist, Top Rap Artist and Top Hot 100 Song. The “Old Town Road” artist could ride into the sunset with his first-ever Billboard Music Award at this year’s show. 
  • Lizzo is feeling “good as hell” as a first-time nominee, scoring 11 nominations, including Top New Artist, Top Female Artist, Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Song, Top Rap Song and Top Selling Song, among others. She could receive her first-ever Billboard Music Award at this year’s show.
  • Harry Styles is a first-time nominee as a solo artist with a nomination in the Billboard Chart Achievement Award category. He could walk away with his first-ever Billboard Music Award at this year’s show. 
  • Jonas Brothers are first-time nominees with 4 nominations in the categories of Top Artist, Top Duo/Group, Top Radio Songs Artist and Top Radio Song. The brothers could collect their first-ever Billboard Music Award at this year’s show. 

ALL-TIME RECORD HOLDERS BY CATEGORY: 
TOP ARTIST 
50 CentAdele, Drake, Garth BrooksDestiny’s ChildTaylor Swift and Usher are tied for the most wins in this category with 2 wins. Taylor Swift is nominated again this year, giving her the chance to have the most wins in this category should she take home the trophy.

TOP MALE ARTIST 
Justin Bieber and Drake are tied for most wins (2) in this category after Drake took home his second trophy in 2019. Ed Sheeran currently has 1 win for Top Male Artist and is nominated again this year, giving him the chance to tie Bieber and Drake with 2 wins.

TOP FEMALE ARTIST 
Taylor Swift leads with 3 wins in this category.  Taylor is nominated again this year and will become the most decorated Top Female Artist with 4 wins in this category should she take home the award. Ariana Grande took home her first Top Female Artist trophy in 2019 and is nominated again this year. If she wins, she would tie with Adele with 2 awards in this category.

TOP DUO OR GROUP 
BTS won this category for the first time in 2019 and they are nominated again this year. If they win, BTS would tie with Imagine Dragons with 2 wins for Top Duo or Group. Dan + Shay, Jonas Brothers, Maroon 5 and Panic! At The Disco are also nominees this year and could be first-time winners in this category should any take home the trophy.  One Direction currently holds the record with 3 wins in this category. The group previously won in 2013, 2015 and 2016. 

TOP R&B ARTIST 
R. Kelly has the most wins (4) for Top R&B Artist. He won the category in 1994, 1996, 1999 and 2001. Usher follows with 3 wins in 1998, 2004 and most recently in 2011. In 2019, XXXTENTACION received a posthumous nomination in this category, where Ella Mai ultimately won. This year, Chris Brown, Khalid, Lizzo, Summer Walker and The Weeknd are nominated in this category.

TOP RAP ARTIST 
Drake took home this award in 2016, 2017, and now leads for most wins in this category with 3, after his 2019 win. Eminem and protégé 50 Cent are tied in this category with 2 wins each. Eminem won Top Rap Artist in 2011 and 2014, while 50 Cent won the award twice, years before his mentor, in 2003 and 2005. This year, it could be the first win in this category for nominees DaBaby, Juice WRLD, Lil Nas X, Post Malone and Roddy Ricch.

TOP COUNTRY ARTIST 
Garth Brooks has won this award three times in 1991, 1993 and 1998. Luke Combs became a first time Top Country Artist winner after taking home the trophy in 2019, and could notch his second win in this category this year. Dan + Shay were nominated in 2019 and again this year, along with Maren Morris, Thomas Rhett and Kane Brown

TOP ROCK ARTIST 
twenty one pilots and Imagine Dragons were tied for the most wins with 2 each, but the latter became the record holder for most wins in this category after their 2019 win. This year, twenty one pilots has the chance to tie again should they win. Also nominated in this category are Panic! At The Disco, Tame Impala and Tool.

TOP LATIN ARTIST 
Currently tied with 2 wins each, Ozuna or Romeo Santos could set a record for most wins for Top Latin Artist, should either receive a trophy this year. Ozuna took home the award for Top Latin Artist in 2018 and again in 2019. Romeo Santos previously won Top Latin Artist back-to-back in 2015 and 2016. Anuel AABad Bunny and J Balvin are also nominated this year.

TOP CHRISTIAN ARTIST 
LaurenDaigle and Chris Tomlin are currently tied with 2 wins each in this category. Tomlin previously won in 2011 and 2014. Daigle took home the award in 2017 and again in 2019. She could be the Top Christian Artist of all time with 3 wins in this category, if she receives a trophy this year. She is up against Kanye West, who is a first-time nominee in this category, as well as Elevation Worshipfor KING & COUNTRY, and Hillsong UNITED

TOP GOSPEL ARTIST 
Kirk Franklin could break his own record, currently leading with 2 wins in this category in 2016 and 2017. Franklin is nominated again this year and will become the most decorated Top Gospel Artist with 3 wins in this category should he take home the award. Tasha Cobbs Leonard won in 2019 and is nominated again this year. If she wins, she will tie with Kirk Franklin with 2 wins for Top Gospel Artist. Kanye West and his Sunday Service Choir are also nominated for the first time in this category.

TOP DANCE/ELECTRONIC ARTIST 
The Chainsmokers held on to their record for most wins in this category. The duo took home their third award and broke their own record after their 2019 win, and could win a fourth trophy this year. Also nominated in this category are Avicii, DJ Snake, Illenium and Marshmello.

TOP BBMA WINNERS OF ALL TIME (1990–2019): 
 1. Drake – 27 wins total; Top Rap Artist (2016); Top Artist (2017); Top Billboard 200 Artist (2017); Top Billboard 200 Album (2017); Top Rap Artist (2017); Top Male Artist (2017); Top Rap Album (2017); Top Hot 100 Artist (2017); Top Song Sales Artist (2017); Top Streaming Songs Artist (2017); Top Rap Tour (2017); Top Streaming Song [Audio] (2017); Top R&B Song (2017), Top R&B Collaboration (2017); Top Billboard 200 Artist (2018), Top Artist (2019), Top Male Artist (2019), Top Billboard 200 Artist (2019), Top Hot 100 Artist (2019), Top Streaming Songs Artist (2019), Top Song Sales Artist (2019), Top Radio Songs Artist (2019), Top Rap Artist (2019), Top Rap Male Artist (2019), Top Billboard 200 Album (2019), Top Rap Album (2019), Top Streaming Song (Video) (2019) 

2. Taylor Swift – 23 wins total; Top Billboard 200 Artist (2011); Top Country Artist (2011); Top Country Album (2011); Woman of the Year (2012); Top Artist (2013); Top Female Artist (2013); Top Billboard 200 Artist (2013); Top Digital Songs Artist (2013); Top Country Artist (2013); Top Billboard 200 Album (2013); Top Country Album (2013); Top Country Song (2013); Top Artist (2015); Top Female Artist (2015); Top Billboard 200 Artist (2015); Top Hot 100 Artist (2015); Top Digital Songs Artist (2015); Top Billboard 200 Album (2015); Top Streaming Song [Video] (2015); Billboard Chart Achievement Award (2015); Top Touring Artist (2016); Top Female Artist (2018); Top Selling Album (2018) 

3. Justin Bieber – 20 wins total; Top New Artist (2011); Top Social Artist (2011); Top Streaming Artist (2011); Top Digital Artist (2011); Top Pop Album (2011); Top Streaming Song, [Video] (2011); Billboard.com Fan Favorite Award (2011); Top Social Artist (2012); Milestone Award (2013); Top Male Artist (2013); Top Social Artist (2013); Top Social Artist (2014); Top Social Artist (2015); Top Male Artist (2016); Top Social Media Artist (2016); Top Hot 100 Song (2018); Top Streaming Song [Video] (2018); Top Selling Song (2018); Top Collaboration (2018); Top Latin Song (2018) 

4. Garth Brooks – 19 wins total; #1 Albums Artist (1991); #1 Country Album (1991); #1 Country Singles Artists (1991); #1 Country Artist (1991); #1 Country Albums Artist (1991); # 1 Pop Artist (1992); #1 Country Artist (1993); #1 Pop Artist (1993); #1 Country Singles Artist (1993); #1 Country Albums Artist (1993); Country Album of the Year (1995); Artist Achievement Award (1997); Country Artist of the Year (1998); Country Album of the Year (1998); Male Album of the Year (1998); Male Albums Artist of the Year (1998); Country Singles Artist of the Year (1998); Country Albums Artist of the Year (1998); Male Artist of the Decade (1999) 

5. Adele – 18 wins total; Top Billboard 200 Album (2012); Top Pop Album (2012); Top Artist (2012); Top Female Artist (2012); Top Billboard 200 Artist (2012); Top Hot 100 Artist (2012); Top Digital Songs Artist (2012); Top Radio Songs Artist (2012); Top Digital Media Artist (2012); Top Pop Artist (2012); Top Streaming Song [Audio] (2012); Top Alternative Song (2012); Top Pop Album (2013); Top Artist (2016); Top Female Artist (2016); Top Billboard 200 Artist (2016); Top Billboard 200 Album (2016); Top Selling Song (2016) 

Usher – 18 wins total; Artist of the Year (1998); R&B Artist of the Year (1998); Hot 100 Singles Artist of the Year (1998); Artist of the Year (2004); R&B/Hip-Hop Artist of the Year (2004); Hot 100 Artist of the Year (2004); Hot 100 Single of the Year (2004); Mainstream Top 40 Artist of the Year (2004); Mainstream Top 40 Single of the Year (2004); Billboard 200 Album of the Year (2004); R&B/Hip-Hop Album of the Year (2004); R&B/Hip-Hop Albums Artist of the Year (2004); Billboard 200 Artist of the Year (2004); Hot 100 Airplay Single of the Year (2004); Rap Song of the Year (2005); Top R&B Artist (2011); Top R&B Song (2011); Top R&B Album (2011) 

6. Whitney Houston – 16 wins total; #1 R&B Singles Artist (1991); #1 R&B Albums Artist (1991); #1 R&B Artist (1991); #1 R&B Album (1991); #1 Hot 100 Singles Artist (1993); #1 Hot 100 Single (1993); Single With Most Weeks at #1 (1993); #1 R&B Single (1993); #1 R&B Singles Artist (1993); #1 R&B Album (1993); #1 World Artist (1993); #1 World Single (1993); #1 Album (1993); #1 Soundtrack Album (1993); #1 Album With Most Weeks at No. 1 (1993); Billboard Millennium Award (2012) 

7. Mariah Carey – 15 wins total; #1 Hot 100 Singles Artist (1991); #1 Album (1991); #1 Adult Contemporary Artist (1991); #1 Pop Artist (1991); #1 Female Artist (1994); Special Hot 100 Singles Award – Most Weeks at No. 1 on The Billboard Hot 100 (1996); Hot 100 Singles Artist of the Year (1996); Special Billboard Hot 100 Award for the most No.1s ever by a female artist (1998); Female Artist of the Decade (1999); Hot 100 Song of the Year (2005); Hot 100 Airplay of the Year (2005); Female R&B/Hip-Hop Artist of the Year (2005); Female Billboard 200 Album Artist of the Year (2005); Rhythmic Top 40 Title of the Year (2005), ICON Award (2019) 

8. Beyoncé – 13 wins total; Hot 100 Female Artist of the Year (2003); New R&B Artist of the Year (2003); New Female Artist of the Year (2003); Special Hot 100 Award for Most Weeks at No. 1 (2003); Billboard Millennium Award (2011); Top R&B Album (2012); Top Female Artist (2017); Top Touring Artist (2017); Top R&B Artist (2017); Top R&B Tour (2017); Top R&B Album (2017), Top R&B Tour (2019), Top Rap Tour (2019) 

9. R. Kelly – 12 wins total; #1 R&B Artist (1994); R&B Artist of the Year (1996); R&B Artist of the Year (1999); R&B/Hip-Hop Artist of the Year (2001); R&B/Hip-Hop Albums Artist of the Year (2001); R&B/Hip-Hop Album of the Year (2001); R&B/Hip-Hop Singles Artist of the Year (2001); R&B/Hip-Hop Single of the Year (2001); Hot 100 Producer of the Year (2003); R&B Producer of the Year (2003); Hot 100 Songwriter of the Year (2003); R&B Songwriter of the Year (2003) 

Rihanna – 12 wins total; Female Artist of the Year (2006); Female Hot 100 Artist of the Year (2006); Pop 100 Artist of the Year (2006); Top Female Artist (2011); Top Radio Songs Artist (2011); Top Rap Song (2011); Top Streaming Artist (2012); Top Radio Songs Artist (2013); Top R&B Artist (2013); Top R&B Album (2013); Top R&B Song (2013); Billboard Chart Achievement Award (2016) 

10. Janet Jackson – 11 wins total; #1 Hot 100 Singles Artist (1990); #1 R&B Artist (1990); #1 R&B Singles Artist (1990); #1 R&B Albums Artist (1990); #1 Dance Club Play Artist (1990); #1 Hot Dance 12-inch Singles Sales Artist (1990); #1 R&B Album (1990); #1 Pop Album (1990); Artist Achievement Award (1995); Artist Achievement Award (2001); ICON Award (2018) 

Carrie Underwood – 11 wins total; Country Single Sales Artist of the Year (2005), Top-Selling Country Single of the Year (2005), Top-Selling Hot 100 Song of the Year (2005), Album of the Year (2006), Country Album of the Year (2006), Female Billboard 200 Albums Artist of the Year (2006), Female Country Artist of the Year (2006), New Country Artist of the Year (2006), Milestone Award (2014), Top Christian Song (2015), Top Country Female Artist (2019)

Review: ‘American Street Kid,’ starring Michael Leoni, Dave Johnson, Nicholas Pumroy, Marquesha Babers, Ishmael Herring and Stacia Fiore

August 31, 2020

by Carla Hay

Nessa, Ryan and Crystal in “American Street Kid” (Photo courtesy of Kandoo Films)

“American Street Kid”

Directed by Michael Leoni

Culture Representation: Taking place in Los Angeles, the documentary “American Street Kid” features a predominately white group of people (with a some African Americans and Latinos) experiencing or discussing the problems of homeless youth.

Culture Clash: Young people who are homeless usually come from abusive backgrounds and have turned to drugs and/or crime while living on the streets.

Culture Audience: “American Street Kid” will appeal mostly to people who are interested in a gritty saga of homeless youth that is disturbing in showing what they’ve experienced but also inspiring in showing how some have managed to turn their lives around.

Dave “Greenz” Johnson in “American Street Kid” (Photo courtesy of Kandoo Films)

The traditional school of thought in documentary filmmaking is that the filmmakers shouldn’t get personally involved with their subjects, because it will alter or manipulate the outcome of the documentary. Michael Leoni, the writer/director of the documentary “American Street Kid” didn’t follow that tradition. And when people see “American Street Kid,” it’s easy to see why.

The movie takes a harrowing, emotionally chaotic and sometimes uplifting journey as Leoni chronicled the lives of several homeless youth he met on the streets of Los Angeles over a period of about five years. As seen in the documentary, Leoni ended up helping several of the young people he met while filming the documentary, even to the point of paying for many of them to stay in hotels until he ran out of money to do that. He also invited a few of them to temporarily live with him. “American Street Kid” started making the rounds at film festivals in 2017, years before the movie’s 2020 release, but the problems documented in “American Street Kid” still exist for millions of homeless people.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, as of 2019, there were an estimated 4.2 million youth and young adults experiencing homelessness in the United States every year. “American Street Kid” repeatedly mentions that 1.8 million young people in the U.S. are homeless (without giving a source for that statistic), but it’s unknown how outdated that statistic is in relation to the year that this documentary was released. It’s also possible that some statistics about homeless youth have different criteria of what the maximum age is to be considered a “young adult.”

In “American Street Kid,” which is narrated by Leoni, he explains that his interest in filming and ultimately helping homeless youth started when he met a young homeless woman named Seana, who frequently attended “The Playground,” a Los Angeles play about homeless kids that Leoni wrote and directed. In archival footage, Seana is seen briefly in the beginning of the movie, talking about how she used to live in foster homes and she became homeless when she was a teen runaway. Seana also said that her hope was to be clean and sober for 10 years before she dies.

Seana introduced Leoni to a 16-year-old homeless girl named Raven, who also became a fan of “The Playground.” Leoni says that Raven really connected to a character in “The Playground” who was a 16-year-old prostitute, because Raven was experiencing the same things. In “The Playground,” this character was murdered and dumped in an alley. Tragically, the same thing happened to Raven. It’s also revealed in the beginning of the movie that Seana died too.

These tragic deaths motivated Leoni to reach out to Stacia Fiore, who was head of outreach for Stand Up for Kids, a non-profit group for homeless youth. Leoni volunteered to make a two-minute public service announcement to give awareness about the plight of homeless youth in the Los Angeles area. The idea was that the PSA could help organizations such as Stand Up for Kids to help these homeless people. Phone calls between Leoni and Fiore are shown throughout the documentary.

What started out as making a two-minute PSA turned out to be a years-long journey into making this documentary film, as Leoni got more and more involved in helping and advocating for homeless youth. He began filming in Venice and Hollywood, two Los Angeles neighborhoods that have large populations of homeless people. And he explains in a voiceover that it took a while for the homeless people to trust him, but eventually many of them did. In the documentary, Leoni opens up to them about his own troubled background with drugs and temporary homelessness, which makes a difference in how he’s able to relate to the people he’s filming.

“American Street Kid” focuses on the stories of nine of these homeless youth, whose ages ranged from 15 to mid-20s at the time they were filmed for this documentary. Most of them do not have their full names revealed in the movie, and they usually have street nicknames. The young people who are spotlighted in “American Street Kid” are:

  • Bublez (pronounced “bubbles”), originally from Washington state, a teen runaway who says she left home because of her mother’s abusive boyfriends and because she was depressed and suicidal after a friend of hers got shot.
  • Dave “Greenz” Johnson (he’s nicknamed Greenz because of his love of marijuana), originally from Arizona, whose mother kicked him out of their home and who says that his meth-addict father has been in and out of prison for drugs.
  • Nicholas “Nick” Pumroy, originally from Mississippi, who is Johnson’s best friend on the streets and who says he came from a family of abusive drug addicts.
  • Ishamel “Ish” Herring, originally from Kansas, is an orphaned aspiring singer/musician who says his mother was a prostitute and his father was a pimp.
  • Marquesa “Kiki” Babers, originally from North Carolina, who says she was raped at 9 years old by her mother’s boyfriend and who is practically inseparable from her best friend Akira, who is also a homeless teen.
  • Ryan, originally from Arizona, who describes growing up in a household where his mother and stepfather used meth and his stepfather abused him.
  • Vanessa (also known as Nessa), a California native who is Ryan’s girlfriend and who is HIV-positive and pregnant with Ryan’s child,
  • Crystal, originally from Florida, who’s also pregnant and who says her meth-addict father named her after crystal meth and her grandmother often physically abused her.
  • Mischa, originally from Massachusetts, who says she grew up in abusive households where she was beaten and raped.

In telling their stories, the homeless people in the documentary have several things in common: They became homeless not through choice but through circumstances, because they came from abusive backgrounds and the homes they had before were unbearable. Many were in foster care before they turned 18 years old. Childhood abuse (physical, sexual, emotional) is also a common trait of homeless people. The people in the documentary all say that they were abused by family members and/or people in foster care.

And almost all of the homeless youth in the documentary have drug problems, which they usually had before they became homeless, but their drug addiction/abuse became even more of a way of life after they became homeless. In some scenes, Bublez, Nick, Greenz, Mischa, Ryan, Nessa are shown admitting on camera that they’re under the influence of drugs at the time of filming the scene.

Meth is mentioned the most as the drug that the homeless youth are abusing in this documentary (which includes a few scenes of people using drugs), but other drugs are mentioned too, including cocaine, heroin, barbiturates, marijuana and alcohol. The documentary also mentions that meth is popular with homeless people because they often have to spend a lot of time trying to get money and the meth is a way for them to stay awake longer.

The drugs are used to try to block out painful memories of abuse and also as a way to deal with the stress and shame of being homeless. But spiraling into addiction causes a whole new set of problems that aren’t experienced by drug addicts who are not homeless. A homeless drug addict who gets arrested almost never has the money to afford an attorney and rehab. And when they are let out of jail, they usually end up right back to living on the streets and doing the same things that got them arrested, causing a vicious cycle.

The documentary also mentions problems that are well-known to people who know about the plight of the homeless: It’s hard to get a job without an ID or an address. Having identification is a big issue for the homeless people who don’t have access to their birth certificates. Many of them don’t know how to get a copy of their birth certificate and Social Security number (if they are U.S. citizens), which they would need to get a job.

Fiore comments in the documentary: “It’s very, very unlikely that the [homeless] children have chosen to live on the streets.” And for kids under the age of 18, the foster care system can be a nightmare. Mischa, who says she was in foster care from the ages of 10 to 18, makes this chilling statement in the documentary: “I’d rather be beaten and raped every day than have been in the foster care system. They don’t give a fuck about you. You’re just a number.”

Ish says that people who aren’t homeless often have the wrong ideas about homeless people: “The common misconception is that we don’t want to work, that we’re lazy, or that we’re leeching off the system, or that we willfully choose to suffer. To me, that’s sad, because they don’t understand how much work and how much hustling goes into survival.”

Because they don’t have a permanent address and they often don’t have any ID, homeless people get their money any way that they can. Asking for money on the streets is one way. “Spange” is the street term for asking for spare change. The movie shows that some of the homeless youth are so desperate for money that they have signs that say things like “Kick Me in the Ass for $1,” and passersby actually pay to kick these homeless people. Bublez is one of the homeless people in the documentary that uses this tactic to get money.

Crime is another way that unemployed homeless people get money. Stealing, selling drugs and prostitution are the most common crimes committed by homeless people. “American Street Kid” doesn’t show any of the featured homeless people stealing or selling drugs, but Nick and Mischa openly admit that they prostitute themselves for money, and they are shown approaching potential customers for prostitution work.

“American Street Kid” has the expected scenes of the homeless on the streets and squatting in filthy, abandoned houses in crime-ridden areas. Sleeping in certain areas can make people vulnerable to being attacked, which is another reason why a lot of homeless people are reluctant to go to sleep, which is in turn linked to drug problems. And some of the people featured in the documentary sometimes go missing, usually because they’re on a drug binge.

But the movie never loses sight of the possibility that homeless people can go missing for more ominous reasons: They might have been murdered. (During the course of the movie, one of Ish’s former acquaintances was found with dead with blunt force trauma to the back of his head.) It’s also implied in the movie that homeless females are vulnerable to being kidnapped and forced into sex trafficking.

There are also incidents where the homeless people in the documentary get robbed or assaulted, which don’t happen on camera but are described after Leoni gets frantic phone calls from them and he rushes to their aid. The homeless people are reluctant to call police in these incidents because they don’t want to be arrested for vagrancy. And homeless kids who are underage don’t want to be put in the foster care system or be forced to go back to their abusive homes. Leoni assures them that he will never betray their trust.

Over time, it’s clear that the bond between Leoni and many of the homeless people got so deep and personal that they became like family to each other. Leoni could no longer stand by as an objective filmmaker, and he did everything he could to help them. There are several scenes in the movie with Leoni trying to get the homeless people into shelters, transitional living facilities or in rehab. When he paid for them to stay in hotels, he frequently paid for their meals too.

The results are mixed, and the movie shows the highs and lows of Leoni’s experiences in trying to save the homeless people from their destructive and dangerous situations. It’s an uphill battle, as the ones who are drug-addicted have a hard time changing their self-destructive ways. Another big issue is that resources are limited for homeless people, because shelters, government agencies and non-profits that are supposed to help the homeless are usually under-funded and under-staffed. And a major problem with homeless shelters is that they are often more dangerous than living conditions on the streets, as it’s pointed out in the documentary.

Fiore warns Leoni several times not to get too close to the homeless people he’s filming because he will end up getting disappointed and emotionally hurt. Leoni’s producing partner Michelle Kaufer (who is not seen in the documentary but can be heard in phone conversations) also expresses major concerns about the extent that Leoni is getting personally involved with the homeless people being filmed for the documentary.

The movie shows how Leoni’s relationships evolved with several people, particularly with Nick, Greenz and Ish, who all are invited to live temporarily live with Leoni while they try to get their lives on track. At various times, Leoni also gives jobs to some of the guys. Ryan shows a passion for filmmaking, so Leoni hires him as a production assistant for the documentary. Leoni also hires Greenz and Nick to be part of the production staff of his play “Elevator,” despite objections from his producing partner Kaufer, who didn’t think it was a good idea for Leoni to hire them.

Of the homeless females in the documentary, Leoni is particularly fond of Bublez, whom he says he thinks of as his younger sister. He also goes above and beyond in getting involved with the pregnancies of Crystal and Nessa, by paying for some of their pre-natal care. Leoni also advises them to give their children up for adoption. Crystal is more willing than Nessa and Ryan to consider adoption. (The births of the children are included in the documentary.)

The documentary does an admirable job of showing that homeless people should not be reduced to their past and present problems but should be treated as individuals who deserve a chance to be happy and productive members of society. One of the questions that Leoni asks them throughout the film is what they wish they could be doing with their lives. It’s clear that someone even taking the time to ask this question makes an impact.

The answers to the questions vary. Ish (who sings, plays guitar and writes songs) wants to be a professional musician. He’s very talented, and people watching this documentary might already know about his work with William Pilgrim and the All Grows Up, an independent R&B/rock band. Kiki says she dreams of having her own soul food restaurant. Mischa says she wants to work with autistic kids or kids with troubled backgrounds. Ryan says he wants to be a filmmaker. Nick is interested in working in holistic therapy, and it’s shown in the movie how he handles an opportunity to be enrolled in the National Holistic Institute.

Although the documentary is mostly done in a cinéma vérité style with Leoni and the homeless people, there are a few “talking heads” interviewed for the film. Common Ground Community Center’s outreach director Courtney Reid and mental health counselor Celeste Farmer are shown as overwhelmed by the work they have to do and admitting that the center isn’t able to keep up with the demand. They say that one-on-one attention is next to impossible for the homeless people who come to the center.

Ryanne Plaisance, a former development director of the non-profit Los Angeles Youth Network, comments: “If you’re just providing the food and just providing the shelter, it’s just enabling kids to stay on the street. People who are making the decisions and the paperwork aren’t always in touch with the realities of the situations that are affecting the kids. What looks good on paper doesn’t always look good or work well in the real world.”

Some people who haven’t seen “American Street Kid” might cynically think that Leoni did the movie to make himself look good. However, it’s clear from how this movie evolved that he didn’t intend to get so involved in trying to help the people he was filming. Yes, he made a lot of personal sacrifices and took a lot of risks, but the movie makes it clear that the homeless people who accepted his help were the ones with the bigger life obstacles.

One of the most important lessons that Leoni says he learned from the experience is that it’s not enough to give homeless people money or jobs. Homeless people, like anyone else, want to feel like they belong to a family. The homeless problem might never be solved, but “American Street Kid” has some valuable life lessons (some are harsh, some are inspirational) that show how one person can make a difference if they are willing to accept that not everyone will get a happy ending.

Kandoo Films released “American Street Kid” on digital and VOD on August 21, 2020.

Review: ‘2 Minutes of Fame,’ starring Jay Pharoah and Katt Williams

June 24, 2020

by Carla Hay

RonReaco Lee and Jay Pharoah in “2 Minutes of Fame” (Photo by Claudette Barius/Codeblack Films/Lionsgate Films)

“2 Minutes of Fame”

Directed by Leslie Small

Culture Representation: Taking place in Los Angeles and Birmingham, Alabama, the comedy film “2 Minutes of Fame” has a predominantly African American cast (with a few white people and Latinos) representing the middle-class.

Culture Clash: An aspiring stand-up comedian has to decide between chasing his dreams or getting a “real job” to help support his family, and he gets entangled in a feud with a superstar comedian.

Culture Audience: “2 Minutes of Fame” will appeal primarily to people who like simple, predictable and often-raunchy comedies.

Keke Palmer, Jonny Berryman, Jay Pharoah and RonReaco Lee in “2 Minutes of Fame” (Photo by Claudette Barius/Codeblack Films/Lionsgate Films)

A lowbrow, low-budget comedy film like “2 Minutes of Fame” is usually so terrible that it’s there’s hardly anything funny about it. But “2 Minutes of Fame,” despite being very predictable, has an endearing sweetness at the core of its raunchy humor. The movie (directed by Leslie Small) works best when it focuses on the competitive world of stand-up comedy rather than the relationship/family problems of the protagonist.

In “2 Minutes of Fame,” Jay Pharoah portrays Deandre McDonald, an aspiring stand-up comedian who’s been struggling to make a living in Birmingham, Alabama. Even though Deandre has 1 million followers on social media (he has his own YouTube comedy channel), his live-in girlfriend Sky (played by Keke Palmer) is carrying the financial weight of being the main income earner for their household. In addition to working full-time at a hospital, Sky is a nursing student. Deandre and Sky have a son named Jaylin (played by Jonny Berryman), who’s about 9 or 10 years old.

The movie begins with Deandre making a YouTube video ridiculing a superstar comedian named Marques (played by Katt Williams) who used to be respected and edgy but Marques has currently been making horrible movies that have unflattering stereotypes of African Americans. How big of a star is Marques? He can command $20 million a movie, but he’s the very definition of a “sellout,” since his movies make him look like a complete buffoon.

On his YouTube channel, Deandre makes fun of the movie trailer for Marques’ latest garbage movie, which is called “Secret Service Man.” In the trailer, Marques plays a bumbling Secret Service agent who takes a non-fatal bullet for a U.S. president who’s an obvious parody of Donald Trump. (Darrell Hammond plays the president in a very brief cameo.) Deandre has this reaction to the trailer by commenting on Marques’ role in the film: “How can I make the most of money while selling out our people while still being terrible?”

Deandre’s video goes viral (116,000 views in on day), and Marques finds out about it. When a lackey asks Marques if they should get revenge on Deandre, Marques says Deandre isn’t worth the trouble because Deandre only has 1 million followers, while Marques has 30 million. But will Deandre and Marques cross paths in real life? Of course they will.

Before that happens, Deandre is miserable and bored in his day job working as a clerk at a supermarket that resembles Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s. He’d rather tell stand-up comedy jokes to customers than stock the shelves. When his manager Zena (played by Jess Hilarious) tries to get Deandre to go back to work, he and Zena get in a food fight where they throw fruit and vegetables at each other. Needless to say, Deandre gets fired.

The timing couldn’t be worse for Deandre to lose his job because he and Sky are running out of money. Their son Jaylin is taunted by his peers in his piano class for not having a piano at home. Deandre has been behind on a lot of payments, but he’s too proud to admit to anyone outside of his family that he’s nearly broke.

When Deandre picks Jaylin up from a piano class session, Jaylin’s piano teacher Ms. Ellyn (played by Valery Ortiz) tries to tactfully tell Deandre that Jaylin has fallen behind the rest of the students because Jaylin doesn’t have a piano at home to use for practice. Ms. Ellyn (whose hair is styled with huge bouffant bangs) could have been trying to be helpful, but she comes across as condescending, and Deandre is insulted.

“You need help with those bangs in front of your face,” he angrily tells Ms. Ellyn. While he storms out he also calls her a “broke-ass Rosie Perez” and a “Puerto Rican version of Janelle Monáe.” But getting Jaylin a piano is not going to happen at the moment because Deandre and Sky have bigger bills to pay. Not surprisingly, Sky is furious when she finds out that Deandre lost his job at the supermarket.

However, there’s a sliver of hope for Deandre to make money doing what he loves. His wisecracking best friend Eddie (played by RonReaco Lee) has surprised Deandre by telling him that he entered Deandre into a talent contest for aspiring stand-up comedians called Laugh Out Loud Comedy Showcase. The winner of the grand prize will get to go on a Laugh Out Loud world comedy tour with established comedians. The contest takes place in Los Angeles at the Laugh Out Loud nightclub, which will pay the travel/hotel expenses of the contestants from outside the Los Angeles area.

When Deandre finds out he’s been selected as one of the contestants, Sky is skeptical that Deandre can win the contest. She wants him to stay home and find another job instead. Deandre wants to go to Los Angeles and pursue his dream. Sky and Deandre get into a big argument about it. She gives Deandrea an ultimatum by saying that if he goes to Los Angeles, their relationship will probably be over when he gets back.

Deandre and Eddie go to L.A., but of course they face some major obstacles. Eddie (who’s been acting as Deandre’s manager) is horrified and embarrassed to find out that Deandre sold their first-class hotel accommodations, so they end up having to sleep in the vehicle that was provided for them on the trip. Next, they find out that Deandre’s got really stiff competition.

Luckily, he’s met someone who can help. Her name is Taylor (played by Andy Allo), who works as a hostess at the Laugh Out Loud comedy club where the contest is taking place. Taylor scores Deandre a last-minute late-night spot at another comedy club called the Comedy Basement, where he can try out his material before the contest.

Taylor and Deandre are immediately attracted to each another. He doesn’t tell her that he has a live-in girlfriend and son at home. All he’ll say about his relationship status is that “it’s complicated.” Will this cause problems later in the story? Of course it will.

The best parts of “2 Minutes of Fame” are the scenes involving the contest. The stand-up comedy scenes are realistic and the comedians are very funny. It’s obvious that the movie got real stand-up comedians (including Pharoah) instead of actors portraying stand-up comedians. That authenticity goes a long way.

Aside from jokes told on stage, “2 Minutes of Fame” also realistically addresses the generation gap between comedians who started their careers before social media existed and comedians who started their careers after social media existed. There’s a hilarious L.A. nightclub table conversation with Sinbad, Lunell and George Wallace (all playing themselves) talking with Marques about how many young comedians today think they can make it big just by being on YouTube instead of paying their dues in front of live audiences.

Sinbad comments on the days when he was a young comedian: “You know what a ‘follow’ used to be? Someone was going to kill you or [it meant] a sexual predator.” And in another scene, Taylor (who’s close to Deandre’s age) also agrees that the “old school” way is the better way to become a famous comedian, when she tells Deandre: “Y’all YouTubers don’t understand what an art stand-up is.”

The movie also does a good and sometimes hilarious job of addressing the racial and cultural issues that African American stand-up comedians face when they have to represent for their communities but not compromise their credibility by doing anything that would be considered “sell-out” or “race traitor” material. The movie also touches a little bit (but not enough) on the sexism that women experience in the male-dominated world of stand-up comedy. However, since the screenplay (written by Devon Shepard and Yamara Taylor) has a male protagonist and most of the cast members are men, it’s a pretty accurate reflection of today’s typical demographics for stand-up comedy.

All of the cast members do a good job with their roles. Pharoah’s Deandre character is kind of an irresponsible screw-up, but Pharoah makes him likable enough that his immaturity doesn’t become too grating. Williams is not everyone’s cup of tea, especially since some people find his speaking voice to be very annoying, but he’s believable as a jaded celebrity. Palmer does just fine in a somewhat typical role as an exasperated love partner.

“2 Minutes of Fame” is definitely not for very young children or people who are easily offended by cursing and vulgar humor. But for people who are mature enough and don’t mind this type of raunchiness, the movie gives a better-than-expected look at stand-up comedy on the nightclub level and has some genuine laugh-out-loud moments that will keep viewers reasonably entertained.

Lionsgate released “2 Minutes of Fame” on DVD, digital and VOD on June 16, 2020.

Review: ‘Daddy Issues’ (2020) starring Kimberley Datnow, Tanner Ritterhouse, Alice Carroll Johnson and Francis Lloyd Corby

June 23, 2020

by Carla Hay

Kimberley Datnow in “Daddy Issues” (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

“Daddy Issues” (2020)

Directed by Laura Holliday

Culture Representation: Taking place in Los Angeles and briefly in England, the comedy “Daddy Issues” features a predominantly white cast (with a few black people) representing the middle-class.

Culture Clash: After her estranged businessman father dies, a British aspiring stand-up comedian follows his dying wish for her to move to Los Angeles and take over his company, but she gets distracted by her attempts to find love.

Culture Audience: “Daddy Issues” will appeal to people who don’t mind watching dull, unimaginative romantic comedies.

Kimberley Datnow and Tanner Ritterhouse in “Daddy Issues” (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

Since 2018, there have been several feature-length movies with the title “Daddy Issues” (including director Amara Cash’s “Daddy Issues,” also released by Gravitas Ventures), so it’s safe to say that this title has been overused. However, even if the movie had a different title, the 2020 version of “Daddy Issues” (written and directed by Laura Holliday) is so tedious and derivative that it won’t stand out from the pack of low-budget indie flicks that are hopelessly amateurish in concept and execution.

Worst of all, the movie wastes a potentially great opportunity to do a hilarious “fish out of water” story about a British aspiring stand-up comedian who finds herself having to lead an American corporate business. That’s supposed to be the premise for “Daddy Issues,” which stars Kimberley Datnow (who’s also the movie’s producer) as irresponsible slacker Henrietta “Henri” Norton Phillips.

At the behest of her late father’s dying wishes, Henri has to move from England to Los Angeles to take over his company.  Instead, the movie largely abandons this concept to focus on Henri’s pathetic attempts to find love by tracking down and trying to cling to ex-boyfriends she used to have when she lived in Los Angeles during her college years.

The movie opens with Henri (who is in her late 20s) in England, sitting on her apartment bed with a date. She’s more interested in looking at a replay of her stand-up comedy act on her laptop than making out with this guy. She knows so little about him that she can’t even remember that his name is Charlie.

They spend the night together, but before he goes, Henri makes Charlie do a Zoom conference call with her mother and siblings and other family members. Without giving him any time to think about it, right before the call connects, she tells Charlie that he has to pretend that he’s her boyfriend. And there’s another catch: Henri is doing this video conference call while the family is at her father’s graveside during his funeral.  Can you saw “awkward” and “tacky”?

This scene (which isn’t very funny) is meant to show that Henri is kind of crazy and that she has “daddy issues.” When her relatives at the funeral ask her why she isn’t there in person, Henri answers, “As if Dad would’ve cared anyway.”

Henri might not have cared much for her father, but apparently he thought enough about her to saddle her with a big responsibility: Move to Los Angeles and take over his corporate company (which is called Norton Phillips) after he dies. (The movie’s screenwriting is so lazy that it’s never made clear what type of business industry that Norton Phillips is supposed to represent.)

Henri finds out that she has to completely upend her life when she discovers a letter that her father had written to her not long before he passed away. In the letter, he says he wants Henri to take over the business so that she can have a “real” job, instead of pursuing stand-up comedy, which her father calls a “hobby.” (Henri’s father is not seen in the movie, but he can be heard in voiceover.)

So off Henri goes to Los Angeles, a city she’s familiar with because she split her childhood time between living in London and Los Angeles because of her parents’ divorce. Henri also went to college in Los Angeles, so she reconnects with her old pals (three women and one openly gay man) who still live in the area by inviting them over to her Los Angeles house, which was previously owned by her father. Henri’s family seems to be fairly well-off, but she’s no country club kid, and they’re definitely not very rich, based on the basic L.A. house that she has in this story.

Henri hasn’t seen her Los Angeles friends for about five years. All of them seem to be living responsible adult lives, except for Henri, who still wants to party like a college kid. There are several scenes in the movie of Henri guzzling wine and other alcoholic drinks in order to get drunk.

While going through some of her possessions from her teenage years, Henri comes across her Boy Box, where she kept mementos and contact information of all the guys she dated back then. Henri and her friends have a laugh over what’s in the box, including angst-ridden love notes that Henri used to write.

Henri also finds something else in the house: a “meet cute” moment with an unexpected tenant. A guy named Nolan (played by Tanner Ritterhouse) surprises Henri when he comes out of the bathroom. When Henri asks who he is and what he’s doing there, Nolan replies that he’s an employee of her father’s company. Nolan also says that he’s been renting a room in the house while he remodels the house deck. And how long has he been living there? Four or five years.

Instead of kicking him out, Henri lets Nolan stay and makes a snide remark that technically she’s his boss now and could fire him. (You can immediately see where this movie is going as soon as she makes the decision to let Nolan stay in the house.) Henri has been an inactive board member of her father’s company, but she plans to let everyone know that she’s now in charge.

This concept of Henri taking over the business isn’t too far-fetched, since there are plenty of real-life examples of inexperienced people taking leadership roles due to nepotism. Henri’s big boss moment doesn’t happen in quite the way that she expects. When she has her first boardroom meeting with the company’s senior executives (who are all men), she gives what she thinks is a great pep talk.

The executives react with boredom and disrespect. When Henri reminds them that she’s an executive vice-president of the board, one of the executives replies dismissively, “Some titles don’t require responsibility,” before he and the rest of the suits rudely file out of the room.

Henri’s immaturity is on cringeworthy display when she gets to know a company employee named Terrance (played by Max Crandall), a nebbish type who’s been trying to start a side business of handmade wooden figurines. When Terrance mentions to Henri that her father contributed to his Kickstarter campaign for the business, Henri bursts into tears and wails to Terrance: “How come my father supported your nerdy hobby and not mine?”

Then the movie goes off on a tangent by having an entire subplot about Henri’s lesbian friend Alice (played by Alice Carroll Johnson), who’s pretending to Henri and other friends that she’s a hotshot agent at a talent agency. In reality, Alice has a very low-paying job at the agency and she’s drowning in personal debt.

Alice is in a committed relationship with a girlfriend, but that doesn’t stop Alice from coming up with the desperate idea to try to find a “sugar daddy” on the website Seeking Arrangement. That leads to a series of dates, which won’t be described here, because this subplot really doesn’t fit with the rest of the story. Actually, the idea of a young, good-looking lesbian using her physical appearance to hook older men for money should have been its own movie.

Nolan also gets his own subplot, because he’s dating a single mother named Grace (played by Martha Hamilton), who doesn’t want to introduce Nolan to her 4-year-old daughter unless it’s a serious relationship. Therefore, Nolan is having his own “daddy issues” because he’s in that gray zone of dating a single mother without knowing her child. The relationship has also made him wonder if he’s ready to take on the responsibility of being a “stepfather” figure if he’s eventually going to be introduced to Grace’s daughter.

Meanwhile, Henri goes through her Boy Box and starts calling her ex-boyfriends to see which ones are available. There’s a montage of her doing this cold-calling that’s supposed to be funny, but it’s very poorly acted and badly written. Henri finds more than one ex-boyfriend who’s available, including a neat freak named Hunter (Francis Lloyd Corby). And let’s just say that she turns into an irrationally jealous stalker.

It’s kind of puzzling that writer/director Holliday and lead actor/producer Datnow would make this Henri character so repulsive when people are supposed to root for the protagonist in romantic comedies. That doesn’t mean that the protagonist has to be “sweet,” “passive” or even “likable” (see Amy Schumer in the 2015 hit comedy “Trainwreck”), but it’s about the protagonist being “relatable” to audiences in some way. Most people just can’t relate to Henri being such a relentlessly miserable and selfish brat who takes pleasure in hurting people when things don’t go her way.

And it’s easy to see why Henri’s stand-up comedy career is going nowhere: She’s awful and boring. Here’s an example of one of the lines she says in her stand-up act: “Internet service is a lot like my father: It doesn’t do what it promises and then dies.”

It’s not a good sign that the stand-up comedy scenes in “Daddy Issues” also use pre-recorded laugh tracks. And much of the pacing in this “comedy” is off-kilter—and not in a good way. The actors lack chemistry with each other and there are many scenes where the acting looks stilted and uncomfortable.

In the production notes for “Daddy Issues,” Datnow says that she was influenced by classic female-oriented comedies of the 1990s and 2000s, such as “Clueless” and “Mean Girls.” There are some definite influences from both movies that are seen in “Daddy Issues.” The Boy Box is a nod to the Burn Book in “Mean Girls.” And the ending of “Daddy Issues” is completely predictable to anyone who’s seen “Clueless.”

The casting for “Daddy Issues” is also stuck in a previous decade, since this movie is supposed to take place in Los Angeles (which has a very large Latino population), but there are no Latino people in sight in this “Daddy Issues” movie. Even if the casting choices were more racially diverse, it wouldn’t necessarily solve the movie’s biggest problems: the substandard screenplay and annoying performance from Datnow. Unfortunately, this “Daddy’s Issues” movie fails to live up to its potential.

Gravitas Ventures released “Daddy Issues” on digital and VOD on June 23, 2020.

2020 Daytime Emmy Awards: ‘The Talk’ hosts Sharon Osbourne, Eve, Carrie Anne Inaba, Marie Osmond, Sheryl Underwood set to emcee show

June 18, 2020

“The Talk” hosts Carrie Ann Inaba, Sheryl Underwood, Sharon Osbourne, Marie Osmond and Eve (Photo by Sonja Flemming/CBS)

The following is a press release from CBS:

Sharon Osbourne, Sheryl Underwood, Eve, Carrie Ann Inaba and Marie Osmond, the hosts of CBS’ Daytime Emmy(R) Award-winning show “The Talk,” announced today during their broadcast that they will host the 47th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards, to be broadcast Friday, June 26 (8:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network. This will mark the 14th time CBS has broadcast the Daytime Emmy(R) Awards, more than any other network.

The 47th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards will feature awards being presented virtually in leading categories, with recipients and other special guests appearing from home in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional categories will be announced simultaneously on Twitter (@DaytimeEmmys), with others presented in a separate ceremony in July.

The Daytime Emmy(R) Awards have recognized outstanding achievement in daytime television programming since 1974. The awards are presented to individuals and programs broadcast between 2:00 AM and 6:00 PM, as well as certain categories of digital and syndicated programming of similar content. This year’s awards honor content from more than 2,700 submissions that originally premiered in calendar year 2019, judged by a pool of 1,000 peer professionals from across the television industry.

The 47th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards is produced by NATAS and Associated Television International (ATI), which previously produced Daytime Emmy(R) Award ceremonies on The CW in 2009 and on CBS in 2010 and 2011. Adam Sharp and Steve Ulrich are Executive Producers from NATAS, while David McKenzie is Executive Producer and Director from ATI.

A complete list nominees can be found at the NATAS website.

ABOUT “THE TALK”

CBS’ Daytime Emmy(R) Award-winning talk show “The Talk” features a panel of well-known entertainment personalities discussing current events, pop culture, contemporary issues, family, celebrity and trending topics of the day. The daily one-hour series is hosted by Sharon Osbourne, Sheryl Underwood, Eve, Carrie Ann Inaba and Marie Osmond. The hosts swap stories, challenge each other on issues and engage viewers at home about events in the headlines. The show also features celebrity guest interviews as well as amazing human interest stories.

ABOUT NATAS

The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) is a service organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of television and the promotion of creative leadership for artistic, educational, and technical achievements within the television industry. It recognizes excellence in television with the coveted Emmy(R) Awards for News & Documentary, Sports, and Daytime television programming, as well as achievements in television Technology & Engineering. NATAS membership consists of more than 18,000 broadcast and media professionals represented in 19 regional chapters across the United States. Beyond awards, NATAS provides extensive educational programs through its foundation, including regional and national scholarships and Student Production Awards.

RATING: To Be Announced

Review: ‘I Will Make You Mine,’ starring Lynn Chen, Yea-Ming Chen, Goh Nakamura, Ayako Fujitani, Ayami Riley Tomine, Mike Faiola and Tamlyn Tomita

May 26, 2020

by Carla Hay

Lynn Chen, Ayako Fujitani, Yea-Ming Chen, Goh Nakamura and Ayami Riley Tomine in “I Will Make You Mine” (Photo by Eric Yang/Gravitas Ventures)

“I Will Make You Mine”

Directed by Lynn Chen

Culture Representation: Taking place in Los Angeles, the drama “I Will Make You Mine” has a predominantly Asian cast (with a few white people) representing the middle-class and upper-class.

Culture Clash: Three women have emotional ties to an aspiring musician, which sometimes leads to jealousy and mistrust in their relationships.

Culture Audience: “I Will Make You Mine” will appeal to people who like authentic well-written stories about people dealing with life issues as they approach middle-age.

Goh Nakamura and Lynn Chen in “I Will Make You Mine” (Photo by Eric Yang/Gravitas Ventures)

The engaging drama “I Will Make You Mine” speaks authentically to issues about relationships, chasing dreams, and how people view themselves when some of their dreams don’t come true. Lynn Chen makes an admirable film debut as a writer/director in “I Will Make You Mine,” which is a sequel of sorts to two other films in which she had a co-starring role: 2011’s “Surrogate Valentine” and 2012’s “Daylight Savings.”

Dave Boyle directed and co-wrote “Surrogate Valentine” and “Daylight Savings,” which starred real-life singer/songwriter Goh Nakamura playing a version of himself as a struggling musician who plays folk-inspired rock music. According to the production notes for “I Will Make You Mine,” Chen got Boyle’s blessing to write and direct this movie when he told her that he had no plans to write and direct a third film to continue the storyline. (Chen and Boyle are also two of the producers of “I Will Make You Mine.”) Instead of the Goh character being the focus of “I Will Make You Mine,” the film’s story (which is set in Los Angeles) is told from the perspective of three very different women who are emotionally attached to Goh.

Chen reprises her character Rachel, who was Goh’s platonic best friend from high school. She is now married to a successful businessman named Josh (played by Mike Faiola), and they have an upscale lifestyle with no children. From the outside, it might look like Rachel is a pampered “trophy wife,” but the reality is that there are problems in the marriage because Josh cheated on her with his assistant. The infidelity has caused trust issues between Rachel and Josh, and they’re in couples counseling.

Ayako Fujitani returns as Erika Abe, the girlfriend who broke up with Goh in “Daylight Savings.” In “I Will Make You Mine,” Erika (who is a professor) and Goh now have an adorable 5-year-old daughter named Sachiko (played by Ayami Riley Tomine), but the couple has broken up again. Erika and Goh, who didn’t get married, are now living in Madison, Wisconsin. They’ve continued to live together after the breakup, for financial reasons. In “I Will Make You Mine,” Erika, Goh and Sachiko have returned to visit Los Angeles to attend the funeral of Erika’s widower father, who passed away in his sleep.

Singer/songwriter Yea-Ming Chen, who plays a version of herself in the film, is another returning character from “Daylight Savings.” Free-spirited Yea-Ming met Goh when they were touring musicians, and they became friends, but they lost touch with each other when he moved to Wisconsin. Now that all three women are in Los Angeles with Goh, they have to come to terms with their emotional attachments to him and how it will affect their lives.

People don’t have to see “Surrogate Valentine” or “Daylight Savings” to enjoy “I Will Make You Mine,” which is well-written enough to be its own stand-alone film. The movie’s dialogue and scenes flow with authenticity that thankfully doesn’t veer off into melodrama. Perhaps because all of the main actors have played these characters before, their acting style feels very natural in the movie. It’s also refreshing to see a movie that realistically shows how women can deal with complicated feelings over love and jealousy without portraying these women as catfighting caricatures.

Even though Erika and Goh are not a couple, she can’t but help but feel insecure about Goh’s deep and lasting emotional intimacy with Rachel, even though Goh and Rachel were never romantically involved with each other. (In a nod to “Surrogate Valentine,” the opening scene of “I Will Make You Mine” shows Rachel looking at Goh’s class photo in her high-school yearbook and his signed message, “Rachel, I will always be your surrogate valentine. Love, Goh.”)

Now that Goh is back in town, Rachel is starting to wonder if she married the wrong man. If Goh is Rachel’s soul mate/best friend, then should he also be her lover? She’s very tempted to find out. Meanwhile, Yea-Ming is happy to reconnect with Goh as a trusted pal and musician. They bond over writing songs and give each other suggestions. And there’s a possibility that Erika, who’s gotten tired of living in Madison, will move to Los Angeles permanently, since she’s applied for a job in the city. Will Goh want to move back to Los Angeles too?

Goh isn’t stunningly handsome or someone with an extremely charismatic personality. However, the movie shows that these women are attracted to him because, despite his flaws such as tardiness and sometimes being irresponsible, he’s a genuinely good man who treats them with respect. He’s also a devoted and loving father to Sachiko.

In “I Will Make You Mine,” Joy Osmanski has a cameo reprising her “Daylight Savings” character Amy, a wisecracking and cynical friend of Rachel who encourages Rachel to reconnect with Goh while he’s in town. Tamlyn Tomita also has a brief scene in the movie as Erika’s cousin Julia, who thinks it’s a good idea for Erika to move back to Los Angeles and tells her about the professor job opening.

Many filmmakers would have made a love triangle the focus of the story, but writer/director Chen gives “I Will Make You Mine” added emotional resonance to the film by addressing adult issues of doubt and regret over life choices. And having a funeral as the catalyst for these characters’ reunion causes each of them to reflect in different ways on how their own lives are going. Eight years after “Daylight Savings,” Goh, Erika, Rachel and Yea-Ming are at an age range (late 30s to early 40s) where they’re too young to retire but too old act like carefree teenagers.

The movie shows how each of these characters feel some kind of disappointment that their lives didn’t turn out the way that they thought it would. In a candid conversation between Goh and Yea-Ming, she tells him that she doesn’t feel fully grown-up because she’s still struggling financially—she works at a bar, occasionally performs in clubs, and gripes about having a much-younger roommate who makes more money than she does.

Goh tells Yea-Ming that although he hasn’t completely given up on music as his dream career, he’s had to put those dreams on hold and hide them from Erika, who thinks that being a musician is an unstable lifestyle choice. He has a day job in customer service, and he confesses to Yea-Ming that he secretly bought a cheap acoustic guitar, which he keeps in a storage room at his job, and he plays the guitar on his work breaks.

Erika, whose parents had a long marriage, is also feeling disappointed that she’s now single mother without a partner, even though she and Goh are co-parenting Sachiko in the best way that they can. Rachel, who used to be in an a cappella singing group in college, hasn’t even told her husband about her love of music, until he catches her looking at one of Goh’s YouTube clips. When he asks her who it is, Rachel doesn’t reveal how well she knows Goh, and she tells Josh that Goh is just “some musician” that she just “stumbled on” when she was on YouTube.

“I Will Make You Mine” also has light touches of humor that work well in the film. Rachel friend’s Amy provides some comic relief. And there’s a scene at the funeral where Goh performs an original song and he shows some of his social awkwardness. After getting some microphone audio feedback, he announces that he wrote the song for his uncle who died. (Not a good idea to say that at a funeral for someone else.)

Goh also says that he ended up selling the song to a pharmaceutical company, so if it sounds like a familiar ad, that’s why. The way this scene is written is realistically funny, because it shows the reality that many aspiring rock stars often have to pay their bills by writing jingles or selling their songs for corporate advertising. Speaking of music, the big showpiece song is “I Will Make You Mine,” the title track of Yea-Ming and the Rumour’s 2016 album, which Yea-Ming performs at the end of the film. Goh, who composed the film’s musical score, also does a very good with the original music in the film.

For anyone who saw “Surrogate Valentine” or “Daylight Savings,” watching “I Will Make You Mine” is a great way to catch up with these appealing characters, but from a fresh new perspective. And for anyone who hasn’t seen the previous two movies, “I Will Make You Mine” is a charming introduction to these characters and an enjoyable way to experience their world. Whether or not another movie is made with these characters, Lynn Chen is undoubtedly a talented filmmaker to watch and it will be interesting to see what she does next.

Gravitas Ventures released “I Will Make You Mine” on digital and VOD on May 26, 2020.

2020 Daytime Emmy Awards: ‘General Hospital’ is the top nominee

May 21, 2020

Daytime Emmy Awards

EDITOR’S NOTE: ABC’s “General Hospital” is the top nominee, with 23 nods. Following close behind are NBC’s “Days of Our Lives” with 22 nominations and CBS’s “The Young and the Restless” with 21 nominations. CBS’s “The Bold and the Beautiful” is next with 13 nods.

The following is a press release from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences:

The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) today announced the nominees for the 47th Annual Daytime Emmy® Awards, which will be presented in a two-hour special on Friday, June 26 (8:00-10:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

The full list of nominees is attached and available at https://theemmys.tv/daytime.

“Now more than ever, daytime television provides a source of comfort and continuity made possible by these nominees’ dedicated efforts and sense of community,” said Adam Sharp, President & CEO of NATAS. “Their commitment to excellence and demonstrated love for their audience never cease to brighten our days, and we are delighted to join with CBS in celebrating their talents.”

“As a leader in Daytime, we are thrilled to welcome back the Daytime Emmy Awards,” said Jack Sussman, Executive Vice President, Specials, Music and Live Events for CBS. “Daytime television has been keeping viewers engaged and entertained for many years, so it is with great pride that we look forward to celebrating the best of the genre here on CBS.”

The Daytime Emmy® Awards have recognized outstanding achievement in daytime television programming since 1974. The awards are presented to individuals and programs broadcast between 2:00 am and 6:00 pm, as well as certain categories of digital and syndicated programming of similar content.

This year’s awards honor content from more than 2,700 submissions that originally premiered in calendar-year 2019. The submissions were judged by a pool of 1,000 peer professionals from across the television industry whose confidential ballots were then tabulated by the independent accounting firm of Lutz & Carr, LLP. The June 26 telecast will mark the 14th time CBS has broadcast the Daytime Emmys®, more than any other network. The special will be produced by the National NATAS NEWS RELEASE 2 Academy and Associated Television International (ATI), which previously produced Daytime Emmy® ceremonies on The CW in 2009 and on CBS in 2010 and 2011.

“In these challenging times, daytime has been a primary influence in staying connected with its audience, entertaining them, and keeping them informed,” said 47th Annual Daytime Emmys® executive producer and director David McKenzie of Associated Television International. “We are honored to be a part of it. We are also excited for the challenge of introducing a new format that will celebrate the contributions of daytime television.”

Awards will be presented in leading categories during the telecast, with recipients and other special guests appearing from home in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional categories will be announced simultaneously on Twitter (@DaytimeEmmys), and others will be presented in a separate ceremony in July

Review: ‘1BR,’ starring Nicole Brydon Bloom, Taylor Nichols, Giles Mathey, Celeste Sully, Clayton Hoff, Susan Davis and Naomi Grossman

April 24, 2020

by Carla Hay

Nicole Brydon Bloom in “1BR” (Photo courtesy of Dark Sky Films)

“1BR”

Directed by David Marmor

Culture Representation: Taking place in Los Angeles, the horror film “1BR” centers primarily on a middle-class apartment complex with a predominantly white cast, with a few African American, Latino and Asian characters.

Culture Clash: An aspiring costume designer in her 20s moves into the apartment and finds out that her neighbors are not what they first appeared to be.

Culture Audience: “1BR” will appeal mostly to people who like suspenseful, well-written horror movies with an underlying social message, and viewers of “1BR” must be able to tolerate disturbing scenes of torture.

Taylor Nichols (pictured at far right) in “1BR” (Photo courtesy of Dark Sky Films)

The title of the creepy and nightmarish horror flick “1BR” refers to the abbreviation that is often used in listing ads for a one-bedroom apartment. A one-bedroom apartment for rent is why aspiring costume designer Sarah, a woman in her early-to-mid-20s who’s recently moved to Los Angeles, attends an open house at Asilo Del Mar Apartments, which looks like a typical middle-class apartment complex. It’s a motel-styled, two-story apartment building with a swimming pool in the center.

The first person whom Sarah (played by Nicole Brydon Bloom) sees when she arrives is a friendly man who’s around her age. His name is Brian (played by Giles Mathey), who lets her in through the security-system entrance door. By the way that Brian and Sarah look at each other, it’s clear that there’s some mutual attraction between them. The open house is fairly crowded, and shy Sarah feels a little overwhelmed at these new surroundings and by not knowing anyone in the building.

Another person she meets is a senior citizen named Edith “Edie” Stanhope (played by Susan Davis), an apartment resident who’s called Miss Stanhope by the other tenant. Miss Stanhope has an outgoing disposition, but sometimes wobbles and appears disoriented when she walks. Miss Stanhope nearly falls into the swimming pool, and she’s rescued by some observant people nearby who catch her in time to prevent this accident. It’s unclear if Miss Stanhope is intoxicated or has some type of physical condition that causes her to act this way.

Sarah also notices that a creepy guy with glasses has been staring at her from several feet away, but he quickly moves out of her sight when he sees that Sarah has caught him staring. She is eventually greeted by building manager Jerry (played by Taylor Nichols), who has a pleasant demeanor when he asks her to fill out an application form. During their brief conversation, Sarah tells Jerry that she’s new to Los Angeles and doesn’t know anyone in the area. Jerry asks Sarah if she has any pets, and she says no, because she overheard Jerry telling other potential renters that the apartment building has a policy of no smoking and no pets.

However, Sarah has lied to Jerry. She does have a pet: an orange tabby cat named Giles that’s with her at the motel she’s been staying at until she can find an apartment. While in her motel room, Sarah has a tense phone conversation with her estranged father (played by Alan Blumenfeld), who is unhappy and skeptical about Sarah’s move to Los Angeles and her dreams of being a Hollywood costume designer. For now, Sarah is working as a temp administrative assistant in an attorney’s office.

Her father (whose name is not mentioned in the movie) expresses his disapproval, but there’s not much he can do since Sarah is an adult. In the conversation, the death of Sarah’s mother is mentioned, and it’s a touchy subject because her mother died of cancer. Sarah’s father is now remarried to someone named Diane, who clearly isn’t one of Sarah’s favorite people. When he tells Sarah that he’s going to fly out at some point to visit her in Los Angeles, Sarah practically hangs up on him. Later in the story, it’s revealed why Sarah has a lot of resentment toward her father.

Sarah is pleasantly surprised to get a call that her apartment application was approved and that she can move in right away. In reality, someone with limited financial resources, a low-paying temp job, no job prospects, and no parents or friends who can be co-signers on the lease would not be approved for this type of apartment. It’s the first sign that things are “too good to be true” with the building’s swift acceptance of Sarah as a tenant.

On the day that she moves in (with her cat Giles hidden in a blanket-covered cat carrier), Sarah sees Brian again and more sparks fly between them, as he offers to help her move her belongings into her apartment, which is No. 210 on the second floor. She politely declines his help and realizes that she can’t invite him into her apartment either, because doesn’t want anyone in the building to know that she’s broken the “no pets” policy by having a cat.

Meanwhile, Sarah is shown to be a very timid people-pleaser at her office temp job. She meekly complies when a demanding female superior orders her to work overtime on a project and clock out to work on the project, so the company won’t have to pay her for the overtime. Sarah’s feisty and foul-mouthed co-worker Lisa (played by Celeste Sully), who has the cubicle behind Sarah’s, is the complete opposite, since Lisa openly talks back and defies the same superior who tries to tell Lisa what to do.

Lisa is the type of person whose idea of giving a pep talk to Sarah is to reference her vagina by saying, “Vag up” instead of “Man up.” When Sarah asks Lisa where she gets the confidence to not be intimidated by the office bosses, Lisa tells Sarah: “I just remind myself that it’s my fucking life.” Although they’re complete opposites, the two women form a friendly bond.

Shortly after moving into the apartment building, Sarah attends a building barbecue that’s held near the swimming pool. She sees Brian, Miss Stanhope and Jerry again. Sarah also meets some of the other tenants in the building.

They include Jerry’s wife, Janice (played by Naomi Grossman); their pre-teen daughter Natalie (played by Hannah Altman); and a middle-aged married couple: attorney Oliver (played by Jaime Valena) and physician Esther (played by Earnestine Phillips). All of them seem very happy to welcome Sarah to the building as the newest tenant.

Sarah also sees the creepy man with glasses again. And this time, he approaches Sarah by giving her a book titled “The Power of Community” by Charles D. Ellerby. “You should read this book,” he tells Sarah. “It changed by life.” And then as quickly as he appears, he leaves again. Sarah doesn’t know what to think about this awkward exchange.

Even though the tenants in the building are very welcoming to Sarah, she experiences problems at the apartment as soon as she moves in. At night, Sarah hears the very loud sounds of creaky plumbing. The noise keeps her up at various hours. And one night, in one of her rooms, she finds a copy of the apartment building policy with the “no pets” rule and this threat written in bold, red letters: “Some people are allergic, you selfish bitch!”

Because someone has intruded in her apartment and knows that she has a forbidden pet, Sarah starts to feel even more frightened. But since Sarah doesn’t know when the threatening note was put in her apartment, it’s hard for her to figure out who could’ve done it. The apartment building has surveillance cameras, but apparently, the intruder knew that there was a surveillance blind spot near Sarah’s apartment.

During a visit in Miss Stanhope’s apartment, Sarah mentions the creepy guy who gave her the book. Miss Stanhope tells her that his name is Lester (played by Clayton Hoff) and that he’s a harmless widower who lost his wife to cancer. Miss Stanhope is a former Hollywood B-movie actress, so Sarah enjoys Miss Stanhope’s company and likes to hear stories about what it was like to make movies back in Miss Stanhope’s heyday. But Sarah sees more signs that Miss Stanhope is experiencing something that’s affecting her physical balance. Miss Stanhope says it’s just because of her old age and she laughs it off.

Meanwhile, the loud plumbing noises at night has caused Sarah to lose sleep, and it’s affecting her ability to think clearly and be alert in the office. Lisa notices that Sarah hasn’t been her usual self, so Sarah confides in Lisa about what’s been going on at the apartment. Sarah also invites Lisa over to her apartment to hang out and so Lisa can possibly hear the strange noises too.

What happens in the last two-thirds of the movie has a lot of spoiler information that won’t be revealed in this review, but it’s enough to say that Sarah finds out the hard way that there are very sinister forces in the apartment. Are these forces supernatural or not? That’s something also revealed in the movie, which has some intense and graphic torture scenes that might be too disturbing for very young or sensitive viewers.

However, the violence in the movie is not gratuitous, and much of the horror is psychological. Writer/director David Marmor makes an impressive feature-film debut with “1BR,” which has a low budget, but the quality of the film is much higher than a lot of horror movies released by major studios. The taut pacing and suspense of “1BR” will grip viewers until the very last scene. And although some of the film’s concepts aren’t new—influences includes director Roman Polanski’s horror films and director Karyn Kusama’s 2016 horror flick “The Invitation”—”1BR” has a clever way of making social commentary about propaganda and conformity.

All of the actors do a perfectly fine, but not outstanding, job of portraying their characters. Brydon Bloom’s portrayal of Sarah is believable and empathetic, considering that she has to carry the film in almost every scene. However, the real strengths of the movie are the film’s story and the terrifying way that it’s told.

“1BR” also makes effective use of music, by infusing retro pop songs in some of the more horrifying scenes, such as the Three Thirds Orchestra’s cover versions of Andy Williams’ “Happy Heart” and Merilee Rush/Juice Newton’s “Angel of the Morning.” Quentin Tarantino famously uses upbeat or sappy pop music in the violent scenes in many of his movies, so there’s a bit of that influence in “1BR.”

Best of all for a horror movie, “1BR” will keep people guessing about what’s going to happen next. There are many horror movies being made that are utterly predictable, but “1BR” does not have that problem. The ending is chillingly haunting and will stay with viewers long after seeing this movie.

Dark Sky Films released “1BR” on digital and VOD on April 24, 2020.

Review: ‘Open,’ starring Essence Atkins, Keith Robinson, Matt Cedeno and Jasmine Guy

March 15, 2020

by Carla Hay

Keith Robinson and Essence Atkins in “Open” (Photo courtesy of BET)

“Open”

Directed by Cas Sigers-Beedles

Culture Representation: Taking place in Los Angeles, the marital drama “Open” has a predominantly African American cast (with some white people and a few Latinos) representing the middle-class.

Culture Clash: A husband and a wife, who’ve been married to each other for about 10 years, experience problems in their “open marriage” agreement.

Culture Audience: “Open” will appeal primarily to people who like Lifetime-type movies about love and marriage issues.

Matt Cedeno and Essence Atkins in “Open” (Photo courtesy of BET)

Stepping into a TV-movie space that’s usually occupied by Lifetime original movies, the BET original movie “Open” takes a look at what happens when a couple’s “open marriage” agreement goes wrong. Lifetime has done several movies about this topic already, but always with white people as the married couple. “Open” is BET’s presentation of this issue from an African American perspective. “Open” writer/director Cas Sigers-Beedles is African American too.

Even though “Open” is from BET, the pacing, tone and plot of the movie are very much in the mold of a Lifetime TV movie. In the beginning of the film, which takes place in Los Angeles, married couple Wren (which is her nickname; her real name is Karenna) and Cameron (Keith Robinson) seem to have a blissful relationship. Wren is the owner of a small bakery/pastry shop called Sweet Bites Bistro. Cameron is a successful architect. They’re both in the early 40s age range, and they’re about to celebrate their 10th anniversary as a married couple with a big party in Los Angeles, followed by a romantic trip to Belize.

While at work, Wren gets a call from Cameron, who tells her that he recently landed a major client. She enthusiastically congratulates him and they exchange some lovey-dovey banter. When Cameron gets off the phone, viewers see that he’s with another woman, who’s clad in lingerie. He tells her firmly, “You know the rules. After tonight, I can’t see you any more.”

What’s going on here? As it’s eventually revealed in the movie, Wren and Cameron have an open marriage. And so does one of Wren’s employees, Noel (played by Nisey Woods), a white woman who is Wren’s closest confidante. They candidly discuss their marriages and other things about their lives with each other.

Later in the story, it’s revealed that Wren got the idea to try an open marriage from Noel, who’s told Wren that the arrangement has done wonders for her own marriage to her husband Trevor. However, Noel repeatedly warns Wren that open marriages work if the couples stick by the rules that they agree on and are honest about their other sex partners. As Noel tells Wren, “You can’t call it real love unless it’s been tested.”

And the marriage of Wren and Cameron will definitely be tested. The next thing we see is Wren at a gallery opening for a photo exhibit of urban life. She’s at the gallery because she was invited by the exhibit’s hunky photographer Mars (played by Matt Cedeno), who is visiting from out of town. Mars and Wren have a history together: They dated when they were in high school, and she lost her virginity to him.

Through conversations shown in the film, viewers find out that Mars is the restless “bad boy” type, and he and Wren eventually drifted apart. But it should come as no surprise that when Mars and Wren see each other again, they still have some romantic sparks between them. Mars knows that Wren is married, and he flirts heavily with her. Wren plays coy until she tells Mars that she’s not as straight-laced as when they knew each other as teenagers. And then she reveals to him that she and her husband have been in an open marriage for about three years. Of course, Mars is thrilled to hear this news.

Meanwhile, it soon becomes clear that not everyone in Wren’s life knows about her open marriage, but that secret will eventually be revealed to some people. Her meddlesome mother Betty (played by Jasmine Guy) has long been divorced from Wren’s father. The divorce, which was caused by the ex-husband’s infidelity, has left deep emotional scars on Wren and Betty. Wren tells people such as Noel and Cameron that she doesn’t want to end up like her mother: bitter and mistrustful when it comes to marriage. It’s one of the reasons why Wren was the one who suggested to Cameron that they try an open marriage, since Wren believes that monogamy isn’t very realistic for most people.

Wren is Betty’s only child, so Betty is constantly pressuring Wren to become a mother too. Wren and Cameron have actually been trying to start a family for a while (Wren is taking IVF treatments), but so far have been unsuccessful. It’s hinted in the movie that their inability to conceive is another reason why their marriage hits a rough patch.

Cameron and Wren’s open marriage is also kept a secret from his younger brother Washington (played by Jared Wofford), who’s recently gotten married to romance-obsessed Courtney (played by Marquita Goings). Courtney is the type of wife who expects her husband to always say and do romantic things, or else she panics and thinks that something is wrong in their relationship.

Wren and Courtney are in the same women’s book club together. It’s the type of book club that reads self-help books about relationships. Courtney, who obviously admires Wren and Cameron’s relationship, asks Wren during a book-club meeting for marriage advice. Wren says, “You have to compromise and adapt.”

Meanwhile, Wren and Mars continue to meet up. Their flirtations turn into a steamy private photo session, then inevitable kissing, and then a full-blown affair, which Wren keeps a secret from Cameron. As she continues to see Mars on the side, Wren gets increasingly suspicious and jealous of Cameron’s relationship with his high-ranking boss Zoey (played by Ernestine Johnson Morrison), who has the kind of “boss lady” power that Wren secretly envies.

Wren’s insecurity also comes from a place of guilt, since cheaters often accuse their partners of cheating too. Cameron denies that anything is going on between him and Zoey, but Wren keeps pushing the issue, and it leads to arguments between the couple.

During her hot’n’heavy affair with Mars, Wren gets careless. She and Mars are seen canoodling together in public by someone who knows Wren and gets very upset about what was witnessed, and it has a domino effect. And that woman who slept with Cameron in the beginning of the story? She’s not quite done with Cameron, and there’s a possibility that she could ruin his marriage.

And sometime during all of this drama, Wren and Cameron attend their first swingers’ party. (There’s no nudity in the movie, and any sex scenes are very tame.) When they come home from the party, Wren and Cameron decide that a swingers’ party isn’t their thing, but they want to continue to have an open marriage. The problem is that Wren has broken one of the cardinal rules of their open marriage: Don’t lie to each other about their outside flings.

Cameron and Wren actually have six rules about their open marriage, which Cameron lists during a major blowup that happens later. And Wren has broken almost all of the rules, including the rules to only have sex with strangers; no intimate dates in public; and keep any sexual encounter with an outside partner a one-time thing with that person. The only rule that Wren didn’t break is to be honest with an outside partner about her marital status.

Just like a Lifetime movie, “Open” is ultimately a cautionary and predictable tale about the perils of married or committed couples who agree to have sex or date other people while staying in their relationship. Time and time again, these stories usually have someone in the relationship breaking the rules, intentionally or unintentionally, and a decision has to be made about what will happen to the relationship.

“Open” breaks no new ground, and the acting is satisfactory for this type of very formulaic movie, although “A Different World” former co-star Guy injects some sassy humor into her role as Wren’s jaded but protective mother. Atkins and Robinson have an easy chemistry together, but maybe that’s because they played boyfriend and girlfriend in the 2000s sitcom “Half & Half.”

And although viewers can easily see that Mars isn’t the type of guy who would be a realistic long-term partner for Wren (considering that he lives far from Los Angeles, and he and travels frequently around the world), Cedeno brings a lot of convincing sexual heat to the role. He makes it entirely believable that Wren would want to escape some of the monotony in her marriage into the arms of her first love, especially if he’s sexy and physically attractive.

In terms of production values, the movie has a very low-budget quality to it. The sound mixing is almost amateurish, like a student film, because the echoes in the room can often be heard in a scene. Another odd distraction is that several scenes have over-filtering of the light on Atkins, who is one of the producers of the film.

The different lighting for her is very obvious in scenes where the camera switches back and forth between Atkins and a co-star who are in the same room. Atkins has that filtered glow, while her co-star doesn’t. It leads one to believe that since Atkins was a producer of the movie, she was the one who wanted to get this special lighting. It actually isn’t a good look, because the uneven lighting lowers the quality of the film.

Even though “Open” has a predominantly African American cast, the movie doesn’t have much in common with Tyler Perry-directed movie dramas, which usually have very over-the-top plot twists. “Open” is much more realistic than a Tyler Perry movie. A Tyler Perry drama also has at least one African American man in the movie who’s an abusive character, while there are no abusive men in “Open.”

Cameron isn’t perfect (no one is), but he’s actually a good guy who tries to be an understanding and honest husband. Wren is the one in the relationship who’s dishonest, hypocritical and disrespectful of her marriage and the rules she and Cameron agreed to have. People will have to see the film to find out how Wren and Cameron deal with these flaws and how it ultimately affects their marriage.

“Open” is certainly not a horrible movie. It’s just not a very compelling one, even for this genre of female-oriented relationship drama. “Open” starts off kind of dull and slow, but the melodrama definitely picks up in the last third of the film. For a lot of people, these kinds of TV movies are like the “comfort junk food” of entertainment. These movies don’t try to be anything else, and so that’s what you should expect.

BET and BET Her premiered “Open” on March 14, 2020.