2021 Academy Awards: ‘Mank’ is the top nominee

March 15, 2021

by Carla Hay

Amanda Seyfried and Gary Oldman in “Mank” (Photo courtesy of Netflix)

With 10 nods, the Netflix drama “Mank” is the top nominee for the 93rd Annual Academy Awards, which will take place at Union Station and at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on April 25, 2021. There will be no host for the ceremony, which will be telecast in the U.S. on ABC. The nominations were announced on March 15, 2021, by spouses Nick Jonas and Priyanka Chopra Jonas.

The nominations for “Mank” include Best Picture, Best Actor (for Gary Oldman), Best Director (for David Fincher) and Best Supporting Actress (for Amanda Seyfried). The movie is about screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz, nicknamed Mank, and his experiences while writing the Oscar-winning screenplay to the 1941 film “Citizen Kane, including his clashes with “Citizen Kane” director/co-writer Orson Welles.

The other contenders for Best Picture are Sony Pictures Classics’ “The Father,” Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Judas and the Black Messiah,” A24’s “Minari,” Searchlight Pictures’ “Nomadland,” Focus Features’ “Promising Young Woman,” Amazon Studios’ “Sound of Metal” and Netflix’s “The Trial of the Chicago 7.” All of these movies except for “Promising Young Woman” have six Oscar nominations each, which is the second-highest number of nominations for the 2021 Academy Awards ceremony. (Click here to read Culture Mix’s reviews of all these movies that are nominated for Best Picture.)

The awards are voted for by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. For the 2021 ceremony, eligible movies were those released in the U.S. in 2020 and (due to the coronavirus pandemic) the eligibility period was extended to movies released in January and February 2021. Because of the pandemic, movies that were planned for a theatrical release but were released directly to home video or on streaming services were also eligible. Beginning with the 2022 Academy Awards ceremony, there will be a required 10 movies nominated for Best Picture. From 2009 to 2021, the rule was that there could be five to 10 movies per year nominated for Best Picture.

Snubs and Surprises

“Da 5 Bloods” director Spike Lee (pictured at far left) with cast members Isiah Whitlock Jr., Delroy Lindo, Jonathan Majors, Clarke Peters and Norm Lewis on the set of “Da 5 Bloods.” (Photo by David Lee/Netflix)

The Netflix drama “Da 5 Bloods,” which has been getting nominations at other major award shows, only managed to garner one Oscar nod: Best Original Score (for Terence Blanchard). Some pundits had predicted that “Da 5 Bloods” would get Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Best Director (for Spike Lee) and Best Actor (for Delroy Lindo). Other highly acclaimed movies that were shut out of the Best Picture race include the Amazon Studios drama “One Night in Miami…” and the Netflix drama “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” although “One Night in Miami…” got three Oscar nods in other categories, while “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” received five Oscar nominations.

Meanwhile, movies that have been getting awards and nominations elsewhere were completely snubbed by the Academy Awards. They include the Focus Features drama “Never Rarely Sometimes Always,” the STX drama “The Mauritanian,” the Netflix comedy “The Forty-Year-Old Version” and the A24 drama “First Cow.” 

Although “Mank” leads with the most Oscar nominations this year, the movie failed to get a nod for Best Original Screenplay. (The movie was written by David Fincher’s late father Jack Fincher.) This lack of a screenplay Oscar nomination doesn’t bode well for “Mank’s” chances to win Best Picture. It’s very rare for a movie not to win Best Picture without getting a screenplay nomination.

And shut out of the race for Best Director is Aaron Sorkin of “The Trial of the Chicago 7,” even though he has been getting Best Director nominations at almost every major award show where he’s eligible for this movie. However, as the screenwriter for “The Trial of the Chicago 7,” Sorkin did score an Oscar nod for Best Original Screenplay. 

Some of the biggest surprise nominations came from international films. Thomas Vinterberg of the Samuel Goldwyn Films drama “Another Round” (a movie from Denmark) received a nomination for Best Director. Gravitas Ventures’ Chilean film “The Mole Agent” got a nomination for Best Documentary Feature, after being largely ignored for nominations at other movie award shows.

And “Judas and the Black Messiah” co-star LaKeith Stanfield got a surprise nod for Best Supporting Actor, a category that also includes “Judas and the Black Messiah” co-star Daniel Kaluuya. Stanfield was shut of of getting nominated for this movie at most other award shows, while Kaluuya has been winning Best Supporting Actor prizes for the movie, thereby making Kaluuya a frontrunner in the category this year.

Diversity and Inclusion

Steven Yeun, Alan S. Kim, Yuh-Jung Youn, Yeri Han and Noel Cho in “Minari” (Photo by Josh Ethan Johnson/A24) 

For the first time in Academy Awards history, two women have been nominated in the same year for Best Director: Chloé Zhao of “Nomadland” and Emerald Fennell of “Promising Young Woman.” Zhao (who is the first women of color to get an Oscar nod for Best Director) is a quadruple Oscar nominee this year for “Nomadland,” since she’s also nominated for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Film Editing. Fennell is a triple nominee, since her other Oscar nominations this year are for Best Picture and for Best Original Screenplay.

Racial diversity is in every actor/actress category at 2021 Academy Awards, since there is at least one person of color nominated in each category. Black people are represented the most with “Judas and the Black Messiah,” which made Oscar history for being the first movie from an all-black team of producers (Shaka King, Charles D. King and Ryan Coogler) to be nominated for Best Picture. The movie also earned nominations for the aforementioned co-stars Kaluuya and Stanfield; songwriter H.E.R. and Tiara Thomas, whose song “Fight for You” is up for Best Original Song’; and “Judas and the Black Messiah” director Shaka King, who co-wrote the screenplay, is a double Oscar nominee this year, since he’s also up for Best Original Screenplay.

Leslie Odom Jr. is a double nominee for “One Night in Miami…,” since he received nods for Best Supporting Actor and for co-writing the song “Speak Now,” which is one of the contenders for Best Original Song. Kemp Powers received his first Oscar nomination (Best Adapted Screenplay), for “One Night in Miami…,” which is based on the play that he wrote of the same title. Powers is a co-director of the Oscar-nominated animated film “Soul,” but he was not nominated for this movie, since the nomination for Best Animated Feature goes to a film’s director(s) and producer(s). However, composer Jon Batiste of “Soul” is nominated for Best Original Score, along with lead composers Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross.

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” got expected nominations for the late Chadwick Boseman (Best Actor) and Viola Davis (Best Actress). With this nomination, Davis is the black actress with the most Oscar nods. She has four so far, including one win for Best Supporting Actress for the 2016 drama “Fences.” Mia Neal and Jamika Wilson of “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” made Oscar history by being the first black people nominated for Best Makeup and Hairstyling. 

Also nominated for Best Actress at the 2021 Academy Awards is Andra Day of Hulu’s “The United States vs. Billie Holiday.” Ironically, the only other time that two black actresses were nominated in the same year for Best Actress was in 1973, when Diana Ross was nominated for her role as Billie Holiday in 1972’s “Lady Sings the Blues” and Cicely Tyson was nominated for 1972’s “Sounder.” As of this writing, Halle Berry is the only black person who has won an Oscar for Best Actress. She did so for 2001’s “Monster’s Ball.”

Real-life singers Ma Rainey and Billie Holiday also represent the only LGBTQ characters in the actor/actress categories. In real life, Rainey was a lesbian and Holiday was bisexual. Their sexualities are each portrayed in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” and “The United States vs. Billie Holiday.”

Asians were represented in more Oscar categories than ever before, mostly because of “Minari,” a drama about a Korean American family that moves to rural Arkansas so that the family patriarch can become a farmer. “Minari” earned nods for producer Christina Oh (Best Picture); Lee Isaac Chung (Best Director and Best Original Screenplay); Steven Yeun (Best Actor); and Yuh-jung Youn (Best Supporting Actor). Yeun is the first Asian American to get an Oscar nomination for Best Actor.

As previously mentioned, Chinese filmmaker Zhao has four Oscar nominations for “Nomadland” this year. And the Hong Kong drama “Better Days” garnered a Best International Feature nomination for director Derek Tsang. And the Netflix drama “The White Tiger” earned a Best Adapted Screenplay nod for Indian filmmaker Ramin Bahrani.

Pakistani British actor Riz Ahmed of “Sound of Metal” received his first nomination for Best Actor. Ahmed plays a heavy-metal drummer who goes deaf in the film, which also features real-life deaf actor Paul Raci, who is nominated for Best Supporting Actor. It’s the first time a deaf male actor has gotten an Oscar nomination. (Marlee Matlin became the first deaf person to be nominated for and win an Oscar for acting, when she won Best Actress for 1986’s “Children of a Lesser God.) The disability community is also represented in Anthony Hopkins’ role as a man with dementia in “The Father,” whose six nominations include Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Adapted Screenplay. Meanwhile, “Crip Camp” co-director Jim LeBrecht, who is paraplegic, is nominated for Best Documentary Feature for this Netflix movie, which is about the civil rights movement for the disability community.

The Hispanic/Latino people nominated for Oscars this year were all people who work in behind-the-camera roles. Sergio Lopez-Rivera is one of three people nominated for Best Makeup and Hairstyling for “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” And as previously mentioned, the Chilean film “The Mole Agent” (directed by Marcela Santibáñez) is nominated for Best Documentary Feature.

Also in the Best International Feature category is director Kaouther Ben Hania, who is nominated for the Tunisian film “The Man Who Sold His Skin,” making it the first time that a movie from Tunisia has gotten an Oscar nomination in this category. 

Here is the complete list of nominations for the 2021 Academy Awards:

Best Picture

“The Father” (Sony Pictures Classics) 

“Judas and the Black Messiah” (Warner Bros.) 

“Mank” (Netflix) 

“Minari” (A24) 

“Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures) 

“Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features) 

“Sound of Metal” (Amazon Studios) 

“The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix) 

Best Director

Thomas Vinterberg (“Another Round”)

David Fincher (“Mank”) 

Lee Isaac Chung (“Minari”) 

Chloé Zhao (“Nomadland”) 

Emerald Fennell (“Promising Young Woman”) 

Best Actor in a Leading Role

Riz Ahmed (“Sound of Metal”) 

Chadwick Boseman (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”) 

Anthony Hopkins (“The Father”) 

Gary Oldman (“Mank”) 

Steven Yeun (“Minari”) 

Best Actress in a Leading Role

Viola Davis (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”) 

Andra Day (“The United States v. Billie Holiday”) 

Vanessa Kirby (“Pieces of a Woman”) 

Frances McDormand (“Nomadland”) 

Carey Mulligan (“Promising Young Woman”) 

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Sacha Baron Cohen (“The Trial of the Chicago 7”) 

Daniel Kaluuya (“Judas and the Black Messiah”) 

Leslie Odom Jr. (“One Night in Miami”) 

Paul Raci (“Sound of Metal”) 

LaKeith Stanfield (“Judas and the Black Messiah”)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Maria Bakalova (“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm”) 

Glenn Close (“Hillbilly Elegy”) 

Olivia Colman (“The Father”) 

Amanda Seyfried (“Mank”) 

Yuh-jung Youn (“Minari”) 

Best Adapted Screenplay

“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm.” Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen, Anthony Hines, Dan Swimer, Peter Baynham, Erica Rivinoja, Dan Mazer, Jena Friedman and Lee Kern; Story by Sacha Baron Cohen, Anthony Hines, Dan Swimer and Nina Pedrad

“The Father,” Christopher Hampton and Florian Zeller

“Nomadland,” Chloé Zhao 

“One Night in Miami,” Kemp Powers 

“The White Tiger,” Ramin Bahrani 

Best Original Screenplay

“Judas and the Black Messiah.” Screenplay by Will Berson, Shaka King; Story by Will Berson, Shaka King, Kenny Lucas and Keith Lucas

“Minari,” Lee Isaac Chung 

“Promising Young Woman,” Emerald Fennell 

“Sound of Metal.” Screenplay by Darius Marder and Abraham Marder; Story by Darius Marder, Derek Cianfrance

“The Trial of the Chicago 7,” Aaron Sorkin 

Best Cinematography

“Judas and the Black Messiah,” Sean Bobbitt 

“Mank,” Erik Messerschmidt 

“News of the World,” Dariusz Wolski 

“Nomadland,” Joshua James Richards 

“The Trial of the Chicago 7,” Phedon Papamichael 

Best Film Editing

“The Father,” Yorgos Lamprinos

“Nomadland,” Chloé Zhao 

“Promising Young Woman,” Frédéric Thoraval 

“Sound of Metal,” Mikkel E.G. Nielsen 

“The Trial of the Chicago 7,” Alan Baumgarten 

Best Sound

“Greyhound,” Warren Shaw, Michael Minkler, Beau Borders and David Wyman

“Mank,” Ren Klyce, Jeremy Molod, David Parker, Nathan Nance and Drew Kunin

“News of the World,” Oliver Tarney, Mike Prestwood Smith, William Miller and John Pritchett

“Soul,” Ren Klyce, Coya Elliott and David Parker

“Sound of Metal,” Nicolas Becker, Jaime Baksht, Michelle Couttolenc, Carlos Cortés and Phillip Bladh

Best Original Score

“Da 5 Bloods,” Terence Blanchard 

“Mank,” Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross 

“Minari,” Emile Mosseri 

“News of the World,” James Newton Howard 

“Soul,” Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, Jon Batiste 

Best Original Song

“Fight for You,” (“Judas and the Black Messiah”). Music by H.E.R. and Dernst Emile II; Lyric by H.E.R. and Tiara Thomas

“Hear My Voice,” (“The Trial of the Chicago 7”). Music by Daniel Pemberton; Lyric by Daniel Pemberton and Celeste Waite

“Húsavík,” (“Eurovision Song Contest”). Music and Lyric by Savan Kotecha, Fat Max Gsus and Rickard Göransson

“Io Si (Seen),” (“The Life Ahead”). Music by Diane Warren; Lyric by Diane Warren and Laura Pausini

“Speak Now,” (“One Night in Miami”). Music and Lyric by Leslie Odom, Jr. and Sam Ashworth

Best Animated Feature Film

“Onward” (Pixar) 

“Over the Moon” (Netflix) 

“A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon” (Netflix) 

“Soul” (Pixar) 

“Wolfwalkers” (Apple TV+/GKIDS) 

Best International Feature Film

“Another Round” (Denmark) 

“Better Days” (Hong Kong)

“Collective” (Romania) 

“The Man Who Sold His Skin” (Tunisia)

“Quo Vadis, Aida?”(Bosnia and Herzegovina) 

Best Documentary Feature

“Collective” (Magnolia Pictures and Participant) 

“Crip Camp” (Netflix) 

“The Mole Agent” (Gravitas Ventures) 

“My Octopus Teacher” (Netflix) 

“Time” (Amazon Studios) 

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

“Emma,” Marese Langan, Laura Allen, Claudia Stolze

“Hillbilly Elegy,” Eryn Krueger Mekash, Patricia Dehaney, Matthew Mungle 

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” Sergio Lopez-Rivera, Mia Neal, Jamika Wilson

“Mank,” Kimberley Spiteri, Gigi Williams, Colleen LaBaff

“Pinocchio,” Mark Coulier, Dalia Colli, Francesco Pegoretti

Best Costume Design

“Emma,” Alexandra Byrne 

“Mank,” Trish Summerville 

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” Ann Roth 

“Mulan,” Bina Daigeler 

“Pinocchio,” Massimo Cantini Parrini

Best Production Design

“The Father.” Production Design: Peter Francis; Set Decoration: Cathy Featherstone

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.” Production Design: Mark Ricker; Set Decoration: Karen O’Hara and Diana Stoughton

“Mank.” Production Design: Donald Graham Burt; Set Decoration: Jan Pascale

“News of the World.” Production Design: David Crank; Set Decoration: Elizabeth Keenan

“Tenet.” Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Kathy Lucas

Best Visual Effects

“Love and Monsters,” Matt Sloan, Genevieve Camilleri, Matt Everitt and Brian Cox 

“The Midnight Sky,” Matthew Kasmir, Christopher Lawrence, Max Solomon and David Watkins

“Mulan,” Sean Faden, Anders Langlands, Seth Maury and Steve Ingram

“The One and Only Ivan,” Nick Davis, Greg Fisher, Ben Jones and Santiago Colomo Martinez

“Tenet,” Andrew Jackson, David Lee, Andrew Lockley and Scott Fisher

Best Documentary Short Subject

“Colette” (Time Travel Unlimited) 

“A Concerto Is a Conversation” (Breakwater Studios) 

“Do Not Split” (Field of Vision) 

“Hunger Ward” (MTV Documentary Films)

“A Love Song for Latasha” (Netflix) 

Best Animated Short Film

“Burrow” (Disney Plus/Pixar)

“Genius Loci” (Kazak Productions) 

“If Anything Happens I Love You” (Netflix) 

“Opera” (Beasts and Natives Alike) 

“Yes-People” (CAOZ hf. Hólamói) 

Best Live-Action Short Film

“Feeling Through” 

“The Letter Room” 

“The Present” 

“Two Distant Strangers” 

“White Eye” 

2021 Critics’ Choice Awards: ‘Mank’ is the top nominee

February 8, 2021

The following is a press release from the Critics’ Choice Association:

The Critics Choice Association (CCA) announced today the film nominees for the 26th annual Critics Choice Awards.  The winners will be revealed LIVE on The CW on Sunday, March 7, 2021 from 7:00-10:00pm ET/PT, with acclaimed film, television, and stage star Taye Diggs returning to host for his third consecutive time. The show will continue its combined Film and Television awards format, honoring the finest in both cinematic and televised/streaming achievement. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 26th annual Critics Choice Awards show will be an in-person/virtual hybrid, with Diggs and some of the evening’s presenters filming from a stage in Los Angeles, and nominees appearing remotely from various locations around the world.

This year’s film nominees are led by Netflix’s “Mank,” which earned an impressive 12 nominations include ng Best Picture, Best Actor for Gary Oldman, Best Supporting Actress for Amanda Seyfried, Best Director for David Fincher, Best Original Screenplay for Jack Fincher, Best Cinematography for Erik Messerschmidt, Best Production Design for Donald Graham Burt and Jan Pascale, Best Editing for Kirk Baxter, Best Costume Design for Trish Summerville, Best Hair and Makeup, Best Visual Effects, and Best Score for Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross. “Minari” (A24) followed closely behind with 10 nominations including Best Picture, Best Actor for Steven Yeun, Best Supporting Actress for Yuh-Jung Youn, Best Young Actor/Actress for Alan Kim, Best Acting Ensemble, Best Director for Lee Isaac Chung, Best Original Screenplay for Lee Isaac Chung, Best Cinematography for Lachlan Milne, Best Foreign Language Film, and Best Score for Emile Mosseri.

With her nomination for Best Supporting Actress for Sony Pictures Classics’ “The Father,” Olivia Colman becomes the only artist recognized for their work in both film and television this season, having previously been announced as a nominee for her leading role in “The Crown” (Netflix). Chadwick Boseman also received multiple nominations for his outstanding performances in both “Da 5 Bloods” (Netflix) and “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix), and Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross have two chances to win in the Best Score category with their nominations for “Mank” (Netflix) and “Soul” (Disney).

In the studio/network tally, Netflix leads both film and television nominations with a total of 72 possible wins. HBO/HBO Max carries over their 24 series nominations, and Amazon Studios expands its total to 18 with today’s film additions.

“What a year it has been for film! We are honored to have the opportunity to recognize the tireless work of so many who overcame unprecedented obstacles to deliver these beautiful, challenging, nuanced pieces of art to our screens,” said Critics Choice Association CEO Joey Berlin. “The stories told by this year’s nominees will continue to resonate and we congratulate each and every one of them for their extraordinary accomplishments.”

As previously announced, two Netflix series lead the series nominations, with “Ozark” and “The Crown” each up for six awards including Best Drama Series. “Ozark” stars Jason Bateman and Laura Linney will vie for Best Actor in a Drama Series and Best Actress in a Drama Series respectively, while Tom Pelphrey, Julia Garner, and Janet McTeer are all nominated for their supporting roles. “The Crown” also saw many of its royal players recognized. Josh O’Connor is nominated for Best Actor in a Drama Series, while Olivia Colman and Emma Corrin find themselves together in the Best Actress in a Drama Series category. Tobias Menzies and Gillian Anderson received recognition for their supporting roles.

Critics Choice Awards are bestowed annually to honor the finest in cinematic and television achievement.  Historically, they are the most accurate predictor of Academy Award nominations.

The 26th annual Critics Choice Awards show will be produced by Bob Bain Productions and Berlin Entertainment.  The CCA is represented by Dan Black of Greenberg Traurig.

Follow the 26th annual Critics Choice Awards on Twitter and Instagram @CriticsChoice and on Facebook/CriticsChoiceAwards.  Join the conversation using #CriticsChoiceAwards.

About the Critics Choice Association (CCA)

The Critics Choice Association is the largest critics organization in the United States and Canada, representing more than 400 television, radio and online critics and entertainment reporters. It was established in 2019 with the formal merger of the Broadcast Film Critics Association and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association, recognizing the blurring of the distinctions between film, television, and streaming content. For more information, visit: www.CriticsChoice.com.

About The CW

THE CW TELEVISION NETWORK, a joint venture between Warner Bros. and CBS, launched in 2006.  The CW is a multiplatform network that broadcasts a six-night 12-hour primetime lineup, Sunday through Friday and streams its ad-supported content, free, without login or authentication on CWTV.com and The CW app which is available on every major OTT platform. In daytime, The CW broadcasts a Monday through Friday afternoon block, and a three-hour Saturday morning kids block. The CW’s digital network, CW Seed, launched in 2013, and offers beloved limited-run series, as well as past seasons of recent fan-favorite television shows. For more information about the network and its programming,

FILM NOMINATIONS FOR THE 26TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

BEST PICTURE

“Da 5 Bloods” (Netflix)
“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)
“Mank” (Netflix)
“Minari” (A24)
“News of the World” (Universal Pictures)
“Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)
“One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios)
“Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features)
“Sound of Metal” (Amazon Studios)
“The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)

BEST ACTOR
Ben Affleck – “The Way Back” (Warner Bros.)
Riz Ahmed – “Sound of Metal” (Amazon Studios)
Chadwick Boseman – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)
Tom Hanks – “News of the World” (Universal Pictures)
Anthony Hopkins – “The Father” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Delroy Lindo – “Da 5 Bloods” (Netflix)
Gary Oldman – “Mank” (Netflix)
Steven Yeun – “Minari” (A24)

BEST ACTRESS
Viola Davis – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)
Andra Day – “The United States vs. Billie Holiday” (Hulu)
Sidney Flanigan – “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” (Focus Features)
Vanessa Kirby – “Pieces of a Woman” (Netflix)
Frances McDormand – “Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)
Carey Mulligan – “Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features)
Zendaya – “Malcolm & Marie” (Netflix)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Chadwick Boseman – “Da 5 Bloods” (Netflix)
Sacha Baron Cohen – “The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)
Daniel Kaluuya – “Judas and the Black Messiah” (Warner Bros.)
Bill Murray – “On the Rocks” (A24/Apple TV+)
Leslie Odom, Jr. – “One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios)
Paul Raci – “Sound of Metal” (Amazon Studios)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Maria Bakalova – “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” (Amazon Studios)
Ellen Burstyn – “Pieces of a Woman” (Netflix)
Glenn Close – “Hillbilly Elegy” (Netflix)
Olivia Colman – “The Father” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Amanda Seyfried – “Mank” (Netflix)
Yuh-Jung Youn – “Minari” (A24)

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS
Ryder Allen – “Palmer” (Apple TV+)
Ibrahima Gueye – “The Life Ahead” (Netflix)
Alan Kim – “Minari” (A24)
Talia Ryder – “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” (Focus Features)
Caoilinn Springall – “The Midnight Sky” (Netflix)
Helena Zengel – “News of the World” (Universal Pictures)

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
“Da 5 Bloods” (Netflix)
“Judas and the Black Messiah” (Warner Bros.)
“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)
“Minari” (A24)
“One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios)
“The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)

BEST DIRECTOR
Lee Isaac Chung – “Minari” (A24)
Emerald Fennell – “Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features)
David Fincher – “Mank” (Netflix)
Spike Lee – “Da 5 Bloods” (Netflix)
Regina King – “One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios)
Aaron Sorkin – “The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)
Chloé Zhao – “Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Lee Isaac Chung – “Minari” (A24)
Emerald Fennell – “Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features)
Jack Fincher – “Mank” (Netflix)
Eliza Hittman – “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” (Focus Features)
Darius Marder and Abraham Marder – “Sound of Metal” (Amazon Studios)
Aaron Sorkin – “The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Paul Greengrass and Luke Davies – “News of the World” (Universal Pictures)
Christopher Hampton and Florian Zeller – “The Father” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Kemp Powers – “One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios)
Jon Raymond & Kelly Reichardt – “First Cow” (A24)
Ruben Santiago-Hudson – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)
Chloé Zhao – “Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Christopher Blauvelt – “First Cow” (A24)
Erik Messerschmidt – “Mank” (Netflix)
Lachlan Milne – “Minari” (A24)
Joshua James Richards – “Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)
Newton Thomas Sigel – “Da 5 Bloods” (Netflix)
Hoyte Van Hoytema – “Tenet” (Warner Bros.)
Dariusz Wolski – “News of the World” (Universal Pictures)

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Cristina Casali, Charlotte Dirickx – “The Personal History of David Copperfield” (Searchlight Pictures)
David Crank, Elizabeth Keenan – “News of the World” (Universal Pictures)
Nathan Crowley, Kathy Lucas – “Tenet” (Warner Bros.)
Donald Graham Burt, Jan Pascale – “Mank” (Netflix)
Kave Quinn, Stella Fox – “Emma” (Focus Features)
Mark Ricker, Karen O’Hara and Diana Stoughton – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)

BEST EDITING
Alan Baumgarten – “The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)
Kirk Baxter – “Mank” (Netflix)
Jennifer Lame – “Tenet” (Warner Bros.)
Yorgos Lamprinos – “The Father” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Mikkel E. G. Nielsen – “Sound of Metal” (Amazon Studios)
Chloé Zhao – “Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Alexandra Byrne – “Emma” (Focus Features)
Bina Daigeler – “Mulan” (Disney)
Suzie Harman and Robert Worley – “The Personal History of David Copperfield” (Searchlight Pictures)
Ann Roth – “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)
Nancy Steiner – “Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features)
Trish Summerville – “Mank” (Netflix)

BEST HAIR AND MAKEUP
“Emma” (Focus Features)
“Hillbilly Elegy” (Netflix)
“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” (Netflix)
“Mank” (Netflix)
“Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features)
“The United States vs. Billie Holiday” (Hulu)

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
“Greyhound” (Apple TV+)
“The Invisible Man” (Universal Pictures)
“Mank” (Netflix)
“The Midnight Sky” (Netflix)
“Mulan” (Disney)
“Tenet” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
“Wonder Woman 1984” (Warner Bros.)

BEST COMEDY
“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” (Amazon Studios)
“The Forty-Year-Old Version” (Netflix)
“The King of Staten Island” (Universal Pictures)
“On the Rocks” (A24/Apple TV+)
“Palm Springs” (Hulu and NEON)
“The Prom” (Netflix)

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
“Another Round” (Samuel Goldwyn Films)
“Collective” (Magnolia Pictures)
“La Llorona” (Shudder)
“The Life Ahead” (Netflix)
“Minari” (A24)
“Two of Us” (Magnolia Pictures)

BEST SONG
“Everybody Cries” – “The Outpost” (Screen Media Films)
“Fight for You” – “Judas and the Black Messiah” (Warner Bros.)
“Husavik (My Home Town)” – “Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga” (Netflix)
“Io sì” (Seen) – “The Life Ahead” (Netflix)
“Speak Now” – “One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios)
“Tigress & Tweed” – “The United States vs. Billie Holiday” (Hulu)

BEST SCORE
Alexandre Desplat – “The Midnight Sky” (Netflix)
Ludwig Göransson – “Tenet” (Warner Bros.)
James Newton Howard – “News of the World” (Universal Pictures)
Emile Mosseri – “Minari” (A24)
Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross – “Mank” (Netflix)
Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, and Jon Batiste – “Soul” (Disney)

NOMINATIONS BY FILM FOR THE 26TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

ANOTHER ROUND (Samuel Goldwyn Films) – 1
Best Foreign Language Film

BORAT SUBSEQUENT MOVIEFILM (Amazon Studios) – 2
Best Supporting Actress – Maria Bakalova
Best Comedy

COLLECTIVE (Magnolia Pictures) – 1
Best Foreign Language Film

DA 5 BLOODS (Netflix) – 6
Best Picture
Best Actor – Delroy Lindo
Best Supporting Actor – Chadwick Boseman
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Director – Spike Lee
Best Cinematography – Newton Thomas Sigel

EMMA (Focus Features) – 3
Best Production Design – Kave Quinn, Stella Fox
Best Costume Design – Alexandra Byrne
Best Hair and Makeup

EUROVISION SONG CONTEST: THE STORY OF FIRE SAGA (Netflix) – 1
Best Song – “Husavik (My Home Town),” Music and Lyrics by Savan Kotecha, Rickard Göransson & Fat Max Gsus

FIRST COW (A24) – 2
Best Adapted Screenplay – Jon Raymond and Kelly Reichardt
Best Cinematography – Christopher Blauvelt

GREYHOUND (Apple TV+) – 1
Best Visual Effects

HILLBILLY ELEGY (Netflix) – 2
Best Supporting Actress – Glenn Close
Best Hair and Makeup

JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH (Warner Bros.) – 3
Best Supporting Actor – Daniel Kaluuya
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Song – “Fight for You,” Produced by Dernst “D’Mile” Emile II and H.E.R., Written by H.E.R., Dernst “D’Mile” Emile II and Tiara Thomas”

LA LLORONA (Shudder) – 1
Best Foreign Language Film

MA RAINEY’S BLACK BOTTOM (Netflix) – 8
Best Picture
Best Actor – Chadwick Boseman
Best Actress – Viola Davis
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Adapted Screenplay – Ruben Santiago-Hudson
Best Production Design – Mark Ricker, Karen O’Hara & Diana Stoughton
Best Costume Design – Ann Roth
Best Hair and Makeup

MALCOLM & MARIE (Netflix) – 1
Best Actress – Zendaya

MANK (Netflix) – 12
Best Picture
Best Actor – Gary Oldman
Best Supporting Actress – Amanda Seyfried
Best Director – David Fincher
Best Original Screenplay – Jack Fincher
Best Cinematography – Erik Messerschmidt
Best Production Design – Donald Graham Burt, Jan Pascale
Best Editing – Kirk Baxter
Best Costume Design – Trish Summerville
Best Hair and Makeup
Best Visual Effects
Best Score – Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross

MINARI (A24) – 10
Best Picture
Best Actor – Steven Yeun
Best Supporting Actress – Yuh-Jung Youn
Best Young Actor/Actress – Alan Kim
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Director – Lee Isaac Chung
Best Original Screenplay – Lee Isaac Chung
Best Cinematography – Lachlan Milne
Best Foreign Language Film
Best Score – Emile Mosseri

MULAN (Disney) – 2
Best Costume Design – Bina Daigeler
Best Visual Effects

NEVER RARELY SOMETIMES ALWAYS (Focus Features) – 3
Best Actress – Sidney Flanigan
Best Original Screenplay – Eliza Hittman
Best Young Actor/Actress – Talia Ryder

NEWS OF THE WORLD (Universal Pictures) – 7
Best Picture
Best Actor – Tom Hanks
Best Young Actor/Actress – Helena Zengel
Best Adapted Screenplay – Paul Greengrass and Luke Davies
Best Production Design – David Crank, Elizabeth Keenan
Best Score – James Newton Howard
Best Cinematography – Dariusz Wolski

NOMADLAND (Searchlight Pictures) – 6
Best Picture
Best Actress – Frances McDormand
Best Director – Chloé Zhao
Best Adapted Screenplay – Chloé Zhao
Best Cinematography – Joshua James Richards
Best Editing – Chloé Zhao

ON THE ROCKS (A24 / Apple TV+) – 2
Best Supporting Actor – Bill Murray
Best Comedy

ONE NIGHT IN MIAMI (Amazon Studios) – 6
Best Picture
Best Supporting Actor – Leslie Odom, Jr.
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Director – Regina King
Best Adapted Screenplay – Kemp Powers
Best Song – “Speak Now,” Performed by Leslie Odom, Jr., Written by Leslie Odom, Jr. and Sam Ashworth”

PALM SPRINGS (Hulu and NEON) – 1
Best Comedy

PALMER (Apple TV+) – 1
Best Young Actor/Actress – Ryder Allen

PIECES OF A WOMAN (Netflix) – 2
Best Actress – Vanessa Kirby
Best Supporting Actress – Ellen Burstyn

PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN (Focus Features) – 6
Best Picture
Best Actress – Carey Mulligan
Best Director – Emerald Fennell
Best Costume Design – Nancy Steiner
Best Hair and Makeup
Best Original Screenplay – Emerald Fennell

SOUL (Disney) – 1
Best Score – Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, and Jon Batiste

SOUND OF METAL (Amazon Studios) – 5
Best Picture
Best Actor – Riz Ahmed
Best Supporting Actor – Paul Raci
Best Original Screenplay – Darius Marder and Abraham Marder
Best Editing – Mikkel E. G. Nielsen

TENET (Warner Bros.) – 5
Best Cinematography – Hoyte Van Hoytema
Best Production Design – Nathan Crowley and Kathy Lucas
Best Editing – Jennifer Lame
Best Visual Effects
Best Score – Ludwig Göransson

THE FATHER (Sony Pictures Classics) – 4
Best Actor – Anthony Hopkins
Best Supporting Actress – Olivia Colman
Best Adapted Screenplay – Christopher Hampton and Florian Zeller
Best Editing – Yorgos Lamprinos

THE FORTY-YEAR-OLD VERSION (Netflix) – 1
Best Comedy

THE INVISIBLE MAN (Universal Pictures) – 1
Best Visual Effects

THE KING OF STATEN ISLAND (Universal Pictures) – 1
Best Comedy

THE LIFE AHEAD (Netflix) – 3
Best Young Actor/Actress – Ibrahima Gueye
Best Foreign Language Film
Best Song – “Io sì (Seen),” Music by Diane Warren, Words by Diane Warren, Laura Pausini and Niccolò Agliardi

THE MIDNIGHT SKY (Netflix) – 3
Best Young Actor/Actress – Caoilinn Springall
Best Visual Effects
Best Score – Alexandre Desplat

THE OUTPOST (Screen Media Films) – 1
Best Song – “Everybody Cries,” Performed by Rita Wilson, Music by Rod Lurie, Larry Groupé, Lyrics by Rod Lurie and Rita Wilson

THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD (Searchlight Pictures) – 2
Best Production Design – Cristina Casali, Charlotte Dirickx
Best Costume Design – Suzie Harman & Robert Worley

THE PROM (Netflix) – 1
Best Comedy

THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7 (Netflix) – 6
Best Picture
Best Supporting Actor – Sacha Baron Cohen
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Director – Aaron Sorkin
Best Original Screenplay – Aaron Sorkin
Best Editing – Alan Baumgarten

THE UNITED STATES VS. BILLIE HOLIDAY (Hulu) – 3
Best Actress – Andra Day
Best Hair and Makeup
Best Song – “Tigress & Tweed,” Performed by Andra Day, Written by Andra Day and Raphael Saadiq

THE WAY BACK (Warner Bros.) – 1
Best Actor – Ben Affleck

TWO OF US (Magnolia Pictures) – 1
Best Foreign Language Film

WONDER WOMAN 1984 (Warner Bros.) – 1
Best Visual Effects

SERIES NOMINATIONS FOR THE 26TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

BEST DRAMA SERIES
“Better Call Saul” (AMC)
“The Crown” (Netflix)
“The Good Fight” (CBS All Access)
“Lovecraft Country” (HBO)
“The Mandalorian” (Disney+)
“Ozark” (Netflix)
“Perry Mason” (HBO)
“This Is Us” (NBC)

BEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
Jason Bateman – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Sterling K. Brown – “This Is Us” (NBC)
Jonathan Majors – “Lovecraft Country” (HBO)
Josh O’Connor – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Bob Odenkirk – “Better Call Saul” (AMC)
Matthew Rhys – “Perry Mason” (HBO)

BEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
Christine Baranski – “The Good Fight” (CBS All Access)
Olivia Colman – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Emma Corrin – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Claire Danes – “Homeland” (Showtime)
Laura Linney – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Jurnee Smollett – “Lovecraft Country” (HBO)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
Jonathan Banks – “Better Call Saul” (AMC)
Justin Hartley – “This Is Us” (NBC)
John Lithgow – “Perry Mason” (HBO)
Tobias Menzies – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Tom Pelphrey – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Michael K. Williams – “Lovecraft Country” (HBO)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
Gillian Anderson – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Cynthia Erivo – “The Outsider” (HBO)
Julia Garner – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Janet McTeer – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Wunmi Mosaku – “Lovecraft Country” (HBO)
Rhea Seehorn – “Better Call Saul” (AMC)

BEST COMEDY SERIES
“Better Things” (FX)
“The Flight Attendant” (HBO Max)
“Mom” (CBS)
“PEN15” (Hulu)
“Ramy” (Hulu)
“Schitt’s Creek” (Pop)
“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)
“What We Do in the Shadows” (FX)

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
Hank Azaria – “Brockmire” (IFC)
Matt Berry – “What We Do in the Shadows” (FX)
Nicholas Hoult – “The Great” (Hulu)
Eugene Levy – “Schitt’s Creek” (Pop)
Jason Sudeikis – “Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)
Ramy Youssef – “Ramy” (Hulu)

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
Pamela Adlon – “Better Things” (FX)
Christina Applegate – “Dead to Me” (Netflix)
Kaley Cuoco – “The Flight Attendant” (HBO Max)
Natasia Demetriou – “What We Do in the Shadows” (FX)
Catherine O’Hara – “Schitt’s Creek” (Pop)
Issa Rae – “Insecure” (HBO)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES
William Fichtner – “Mom” (CBS)
Harvey Guillén – “What We Do in the Shadows” (FX)
Daniel Levy – “Schitt’s Creek” (Pop)
Alex Newell – “Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist” (NBC)
Mark Proksch – “What We Do in the Shadows” (FX)
Andrew Rannells – “Black Monday” (Showtime)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
Lecy Goranson – “The Conners” (ABC)
Rita Moreno – “One Day at a Time” (Pop)
Annie Murphy – “Schitt’s Creek” (Pop)
Ashley Park – “Emily in Paris” (Netflix)
Jaime Pressly – “Mom” (CBS)
Hannah Waddingham – “Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)

BEST LIMITED SERIES
“I May Destroy You” (HBO)
“Mrs. America” (FX)
“Normal People” (Hulu)
“The Plot Against America” (HBO)
“The Queen’s Gambit” (Netflix)
“Small Axe” (Amazon Studios)
“The Undoing” (HBO)
“Unorthodox” (Netflix)

BEST MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION
“Bad Education” (HBO)
“Between the World and Me” (HBO)
“The Clark Sisters: First Ladies of Gospel” (Lifetime)
“Hamilton” (Disney+)
“Sylvie’s Love” (Amazon Studios)
“What the Constitution Means to Me” (Amazon Studios)

BEST ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION
John Boyega – “Small Axe” (Amazon Studios)
Hugh Grant – “The Undoing” (HBO)
Paul Mescal – “Normal People” (Hulu)
Chris Rock – “Fargo” (FX)
Mark Ruffalo – “I Know This Much is True” (HBO)
Morgan Spector – “The Plot Against America” (HBO)

BEST ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION
Cate Blanchett – “Mrs. America” (FX)
Michaela Coel – “I May Destroy You” (HBO)
Daisy Edgar-Jones – “Normal People” (Hulu)
Shira Haas – “Unorthodox” (Netflix)
Anya Taylor-Joy – “The Queen’s Gambit” (Netflix)
Tessa Thompson – “Sylvie’s Love” (Amazon Studios)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION
Daveed Diggs – “The Good Lord Bird” (Showtime)
Joshua Caleb Johnson – “The Good Lord Bird” (Showtime)
Dylan McDermott – “Hollywood” (Netflix)
Donald Sutherland – “The Undoing” (HBO)
Glynn Turman – “Fargo” (FX)
John Turturro – “The Plot Against America” (HBO)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION
Uzo Aduba – “Mrs. America” (FX)
Betsy Brandt – “Soulmates” (AMC)
Marielle Heller – “The Queen’s Gambit” (Netflix)
Margo Martindale – “Mrs. America” (FX)
Winona Ryder – “The Plot Against America” (HBO)
Tracey Ullman – “Mrs. America” (FX)

BEST TALK SHOW
“Desus & Mero” (Showtime)
“Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” (TBS)
“The Kelly Clarkson Show” (NBC/Syndicated)
“Late Night with Seth Meyers” (NBC)
“The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” (CBS)
“Red Table Talk” (Facebook Watch)

BEST COMEDY SPECIAL
“Fortune Feimster: Sweet & Salty” (Netflix)
“Hannah Gadsby: Douglas” (Netflix)
“Jerry Seinfeld: 23 Hours to Kill” (Netflix)
“Marc Maron: End Times Fun” (Netflix)
“Michelle Buteau: Welcome to Buteaupia” (Netflix)
“Patton Oswalt: I Love Everything” (Netflix)

BEST SHORT FORM SERIES
“The Andy Cohen Diaries” (Quibi)
“Better Call Saul: Ethics Training with Kim Wexler” (AMC/YouTube)
“Mapleworth Murders” (Quibi)
“Nikki Fre$h” (Quibi)
“Reno 911!” (Quibi)
“Tooning Out the News” (CBS All Access)

NOMINATIONS BY SERIES FOR THE 26TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

BAD EDUCATION (HBO) – 1
Best Movie Made for Television

BETTER CALL SAUL (AMC) – 4
Best Drama Series
Best Actor in a Drama Series – Bob Odenkirk
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Jonathan Banks
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Rhea Seehorn

BETTER CALL SAUL: ETHICS TRAINING WITH KIM WEXLER (AMC/Youtube) – 1
Best Short Form Series

BETTER THINGS (FX) – 2
Best Comedy Series
Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Pamela Adlon

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME (HBO) – 1
Best Movie Made for Television

BLACK MONDAY (Showtime) – 1
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Andrew Rannells

BROCKMIRE (IFC) – 1
Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Hank Azaria

DEAD TO ME (Netflix) – 1
Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Christina Applegate

DESUS & MERO (Showtime) – 1
Best Talk Show

EMILY IN PARIS (Netflix) – 1
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Ashley Park

FARGO (FX) – 2
Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Chris Rock
Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Glynn Turman

FORTUNE FEIMSTER: SWEET & SALTY (Netflix) – 1
Best Comedy Special

FULL FRONTAL WITH SAMANTHA BEE (TBS) – 1
Best Talk Show

HAMILTON (Disney+) – 1
Best Movie Made for Television

HANNAH GADSBY: DOUGLAS (Netflix) – 1Best Comedy Special

HOLLYWOOD (Netflix) – 1

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Dylan McDermott

HOMELAND (Showtime) – 1
Best Actress in a Drama Series – Claire Danes

I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE (HBO) – 1
Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Mark Ruffalo

I MAY DESTROY YOU (HBO) – 2
Best Limited Series
Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Michaela Coel

INSECURE (HBO) – 1
Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Issa Rae

JERRY SEINFELD: 23 HOURS TO KILL (Netflix) – 1
Best Comedy Special

LATE NIGHT WITH SETH MEYERS (NBC) – 1
Best Talk Show

LOVECRAFT COUNTRY (HBO) – 5
Best Drama Series
Best Actor in a Drama Series – Jonathan Majors
Best Actress in a Drama Series – Jurnee Smollett
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Michael K. Williams
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Wunmi Mosaku

MAPLEWORTH MURDERS (Quibi) – 1
Best Short Form Series

MARC MARON: END TIMES FUN (Netflix) – 1
Best Comedy Special

MICHELLE BUTEAU: WELCOME TO BUTEAUPIA (Netflix) – 1
Best Comedy Special

MOM (CBS) – 3
Best Comedy Series
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – William Fichtner
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Jaime Pressly

MRS. AMERICA (FX) – 5
Best Limited Series
Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Cate Blanchett
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Uzo Aduba
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Margo Martindale
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Tracey Ullman

NIKKI FRE$H (Quibi) – 1
Best Short Form Series

NORMAL PEOPLE (Hulu) – 3
Best Limited Series
Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Paul Mescal
Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Daisy Edgar-Jones

ONE DAY AT A TIME (Pop) – 1
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Rita Moreno

OZARK (Netflix) – 6
Best Drama Series
Best Actor in a Drama Series – Jason Bateman
Best Actress in a Drama Series – Laura Linney
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Tom Pelphrey
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Julia Garner
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Janet McTeer

PATTON OSWALT: I LOVE EVERYTHING (Netflix) – 1
Best Comedy Special

PEN15 (Hulu) – 1
Best Comedy Series

PERRY MASON (HBO) – 3
Best Drama Series
Best Actor in a Drama Series – Matthew Rhys
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – John Lithgow

RAMY (Hulu) – 2
Best Comedy Series
Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Ramy Youssef

RED TABLE TALK (Facebook Watch) – 1
Best Talk Show

RENO 911! (Quibi) – 1
Best Short Form Series

SCHITT’S CREEK (Pop) – 5
Best Comedy Series
Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Eugene Levy
Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Catherine O’Hara
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Daniel Levy
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Annie Murphy

SMALL AXE (Amazon Studios) – 2
Best Limited Series
Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – John Boyega

SOULMATES (AMC) – 1
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Betsy Brandt

SYLVIE’S LOVE (Amazon Studios) – 2
Best Movie Made for Television
Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Tessa Thompson

TED LASSO (Apple TV+) – 3
Best Comedy Series
Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Jason Sudeikis
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Hannah Waddingham

THE ANDY COHEN DIARIES (Quibi) – 1
Best Short Form Series

THE CLARK SISTERS: FIRST LADIES OF GOSPEL (Lifetime) – 1
Best Movie Made for Television

THE CONNERS (ABC) – 1
Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Lecy Goranson

THE CROWN (Netflix) – 6
Best Drama Series
Best Actor in a Drama Series – Josh O’Connor
Best Actress in a Drama Series – Olivia Colman
Best Actress in a Drama Series – Emma Corrin
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Tobias Menzies
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Gillian Anderson

THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT (HBO Max) – 2
Best Comedy Series
Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Kaley Cuoco

THE GOOD FIGHT (CBS All Access) – 2
Best Drama Series
Best Actress in a Drama Series – Christine Baranski

THE GOOD LORD BIRD (Showtime) – 2
Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Daveed Diggs
Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Joshua Caleb Johnson

THE GREAT (Hulu) – 1
Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Nicholas Hoult

THE KELLY CLARKSON SHOW (NBC/Syndicated) – 1
Best Talk Show

THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT (CBS) – 1
Best Talk Show

THE MANDALORIAN (Disney+) – 1
Best Drama Series

THE OUTSIDER (HBO) – 1
Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Cynthia Erivo

THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA (HBO) – 4
Best Limited Series
Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Morgan Spector
Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – John Turturro
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Winona Ryder

THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT (Netflix) – 3
Best Limited Series
Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Anya Taylor-Joy
Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Marielle Heller

THE UNDOING (HBO) – 3
Best Limited Series
Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Hugh Grant
Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Donald Sutherland

THIS IS US (NBC) – 3
Best Drama Series
Best Actor in a Drama Series – Sterling K. Brown
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Justin Hartley

TOONING OUT THE NEWS (CBS All Access) – 1
Best Short Form Series

UNORTHODOX (Netflix) – 2
Best Limited Series
Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Shira Haas

WHAT THE CONSTITUTION MEANS TO ME (Amazon Studios) – 1
Best Movie Made for Television

WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS (FX) – 5
Best Comedy Series
Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Matt Berry
Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Natasia Demetriou
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Harvey Guillén
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Mark Proksch

ZOEY’S EXTRAORDINARY PLAYLIST (NBC) – 1
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Alex Newell

NOMINATIONS BY STUDIO/NETWORK FOR THE 26TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS
Netflix – 72
HBO/HBO Max – 24
Amazon Studios – 18
A24 – 14
FX – 14
Focus Features – 12
Hulu – 11
Warner Bros. – 10
Universal Pictures – 9
Searchlight Pictures – 8
Apple TV+ – 7
CBS/CBS All Access – 7
AMC/AMC YouTube – 6
NBC – 6
Pop – 6
Disney/Disney+ – 5
Showtime – 5
Quibi – 4
Sony Pictures Classics – 4
Magnolia Pictures – 2
ABC – 1
Facebook Watch – 1
IFC – 1
Lifetime – 1
NEON – 1
Samuel Goldwyn Films – 1
Screen Media Films – 1
Shudder – 1
TBS – 1

Review: ‘Mank,’ starring Gary Oldman

February 6, 2021

by Carla Hay

Amanda Seyfried and Gary Oldman in “Mank” (Photo courtesy of Netflix)

“Mank”

Directed by David Fincher

Culture Representation: Taking place from 1930 to 1942 in Southern California, the dramatic film “Mank” features an all-white cast of characters who are are involved in some way in the movie industry.

Culture Clash: Alcoholic screenwriter Herman J. “Mank” Mankiewicz has personal and professional conflicts while trying to complete the “Citizen Kane” screenplay, the 1941 classic film directed by and starring Orson Welles.

Culture Audience: “Mank” will appeal primarily to people interested in dramatic depictions of Hollywood film history from the 1930s and 1940s.

Tom Burke in “Mank” (Photo courtesy of Netflix)

A lot of visual flair, technical precision and above-average acting went into the creation of the dramatic film “Mank” (directed by David Fincher and written by his late father Jack Fincher), but it’s the type of movie that will still leave some viewers cold. The movie certainly has compelling performances, snappy dialogue and impressive cinematography by Erik Messerschmidt. “Mank” is a feast for cinephiles who appreciate the art that came from the Golden Age of Hollywood. But “Mank” is a famine for people who want to see movie characters with relatable emotions that are not motivated by greed or ruthless ambition.

Any disdain or apathy for “Mank” might come from people who don’t care about what the movie industry was like in 1930s or 1940s, or who don’t want to be reminded of how racially segregated America was back then. And people could also be turned off from “Mank” because they don’t want to see this part of American history glorified in a movie that recreates the racist and sexist bubble of Hollywood willing to give an alcoholic, difficult screenwriter so many chances to work on prestige projects because of his white male privilege. These are all valid reasons for people not to like “Mank,” which doesn’t try to rewrite history, but the movie also doesn’t try to make any insightful commentary on the rampant racism and sexism in Hollywood and society at large that didn’t allow anyone but white men to be the top filmmakers during this era.

“Mank” is filmed in black-and-white and in a style that emulates exactly how a biographical film about Mankiewicz would have been made in the 1940s. That’s the decade when Mank (who died in 1953, at the age of 55) was at the height of his career, as the co-writer of director Orson Welles’ classic 1941 drama “Citizen Kane,” which is often named in film historians’ lists as the best movie of all time. The “Citizen Kane” original screenplay, which was loosely based on the life of media tycoon William Randolph Hearst, was the only Academy Award won by the movie, which was also nominated for Best Picture and Best Actor. (Welles starred in the film as Kane.)

The Best Original Screenplay prize for “Citizen Kane” was also the only Academy Award won by Mankiewicz and Welles, who died in 1985, at the age 70. “Mank” essentially tells the story of the tortuous process of getting the screenplay completed and the clashes over creative control. It’s a story that could apply to how numerous other movies have been made under similar circumstances, but “Citizen Kane” just happens to be what many film experts consider to be a masterpiece.

“Mank” depicts Mank (played by Gary Oldman) as a talented and experienced screenwriter but also a hardcore alcoholic. He’s under pressure to finish the “Citizen Kane” screenplay by his deadline. However, his alcoholism and his conflicts with Welles threaten to derail the project. At first, Mank was willing to give full screenwriter credit to Welles for “Citizen Kane.” Much of “Mank” is about how and why Mank changed his mind and demanded co-writing credit.

The opening scene of “Mank” shows Mank checking in as a guest at the North Verde Ranch in Victorville, California, in 1940. His intent is to retreat to the ranch so that he can finish the “Citizen Kane” screenplay in relative solitude. Welles (played by Tom Burke) has given Mank a deadline to finish the screenplay in 60 days. Even though Mank is told that North Verde is a “dry ranch” (no alcohol is allowed), that doesn’t stop Mank from having a suitcase full of liquor delivered to his room.

Mank’s discomfort isn’t only because he’s told that the ranch has a ban on alcohol. He also has to use crutches, because he broke his right leg in a car accident. He’s introduced to the female typist who will be working with him: A British immigrant named Rita Alexander (played Lily Collins), who tells Mank that her husband (who’s not in the movie) flies Firebird planes for the Royal Air Force. Rita’s character, like all the female characters in “Mank,” are written to have only one purpose in the film: to be dutiful, passive, and willing to please the men.

Mank’s long-suffering wife Sara Mankiewicz (played by Tuppence Middleton) sometimes talks some sass to her philandering, hard-drinking husband. But ultimately, she caves in to societal pressure to be a wife who’s completely dependent on her husband. Later in the movie, Mank becomes infatuated with Hearst’s mistress Marion Davies (played by Amanda Seyfried), a famous actress who is all too aware that her good looks and her connection to Hearst are the main reasons why her acting career is thriving.

In an early scene in the movie, Sara is helping a very drunk Mank get into bed. She mentions their past courtship of him being a war correspondent who “ruined” her home. It’s a reference to when Mank worked for the American Red Cross News Service in Paris in 1919 and 1920, the year that he and Sara were married. There are not-so-subtle hints in Mank’s interactions with Sara that Sara knew she was marrying a “bad boy” and made the mistake of thinking that he would change after they got married.

In “Mank,” he spends more time with Davies than he does with his wife and children. It’s a commentary on what the filmmakers think his priorities were at the time. Davies is portrayed as a coquettish charmer who isn’t passionately in love with Hearst (played by Charles Dance), but she’s fond enough of him to let him treat her like his trophy girlfriend so that she can enjoy all the benefits that come with it.

Davies was born to a working-class family in Brooklyn, New York, so Seyfried really plays up these roots with a heavy Brooklyn accent in “Mank.” In real life, by all accounts, Davies had lost her Brooklyn accent by the time she became a Hollywood actress. But the accent that the Davies character has in “Mank” is meant to put a lot of emphasis on the fact that she came from a working-class background and she now hobnobs with the rich and famous.

The Brooklyn accent is also apparently an excuse for the “Mank” screenplay to have Mank utter a cheesy line of dialogue when he’s flirting with Davies. Mank sees her at a birthday party for actor John Gilbert (played by Nick Job), and Davies begins telling Mank some stories about when she used to live in Brooklyn. Mank says in a remark dripping with a bad pun/double entendre: “Your Flatbush is showing.” Mank’s lusty facial expression and tone of his voice leave no doubt what he meant by that comment.

In a scene that’s a flashback to 1930, “Mank” shows the misogyny of treating women only as sex objects. The scene takes place in a writer’s room. In the room are Mank, his younger brother Joe Mankiewicz (played by Tom Pelphrey), George Kaufman (played by Adam Shapiro), Sidney Pearlman (played by Jack Romano), Charles MacArthur (played by John Churchill), Shelly Metcalf (played by Jamie McShane) and Ben Hecht (played by Jeff Harms).

There’s a secretary in the room too, but she’s topless, except for pasties covering her nipples. It’s obvious that she’s expected to look this way and to do things such as sit on a man’s lap when he tells her to do it. The men act as if it’s perfectly normal for a woman to be treated this way in a work environment.

It’s easy to see that the screenplay for “Mank” did not want to rely on showing repetitious scenes of a drunken Mank struggling to finish the “Citizen Kane” screenplay on time because he procrastinates. These types of scenes are in the movie, but at a bare minimum. The movie is filled with flashbacks of how he got to know Davies and Hearst and how Mank was tentatively invited into their social circle. Toward the end of the movie, there’s a big costume dinner party scene where, in true Mank fashion, he shows up very drunk. And you can imagine what happens.

If Hearst was the inspiration for “Citizen Kane,” then Welles was the movie’s visionary creative leader. But the person who had the most influence on Mank’s career was MGM Studios co-founder Louis B. Mayer (played by Arliss Howard), who at times was like a exasperated mentor to Mank, if you believe what’s presented to this movie. Mank spends more time on screen with Mayer than he does with Welles.

The movie has several flashbacks to how Mank’s business relationship with Mayer evolved. In a scene that takes place in 1934, Mank introduces Joe to Mayer, who quips: “We only have one star here: Leo the Lion [the MGM mascot]. Many stars forget that. And now, they twinkle elsewhere.”

Mayer is depicted as someone who’s a control freak and only concerned about himself, but is skilled at deceiving people into thinking he has their best interests at heart. This duplicitous nature is shown in a scene, also in 1934, where Mayer is on stage at an auditorium and speaking to an assembly of MGM employees. Mayer explains that the Great Depression has negatively impacted the movie industry. And he tells the employees that he needs them to volunteer to take a 50% pay cut for eight weeks, for the good of the company.

At first, the MGM employees are angry with the news that their salaries will be reduced. Mayer tells them the other option would be to make staff layoffs. And he assures the employees that if they take the pay cut, when President Franklin Roosevelt opens the banks again, Mayer promises that he will pay all of the employees the compensation that they lost out on during this eight-week period.

The employees go from a potentially angry crowd to cheering for Mayer, who’s convinced them that he’s a compassionate boss who really cares about them. Mank is watching this from the wings of the stage and somewhat awed at how Mayer was able to turn the situation around so quickly. But when Mayer leaves the stage, he tells Mank that the speech was all for show and that he has no intention of making the salary reimbursement that he promised on stage.

As a way to seemingly fill up time in this 131-minute movie, “Mank” also takes a few detours into politics, with an entire subplot of how Mank was perceived as a Socialist and how it affected his career. The movie shows that Mank refused to sign an agreement stating that he would never join a writer’s union. The union was opposed by Mayer and MGM head of production Irving Thalberg (played by Ferdinand Kingsley), who put pressure on Mank to side with MGM. The way it’s shown in “Mank,” Thalberg was ready to accuse Mank of being a Communist if Mank didn’t comply with what MGM wanted.

And as if to make it abundantly clear that Mank was a left-wing liberal, there are some unnecessary scenes of him getting caught up on in the 1934 election for California’s governor. The race came down to conservative Republican Frank Merriam versus liberal Democrat (and former Socialist Party member) Upton Sinclair. Mank refuses Thalberg’s demand to contribute to MGM’s anti-Sinclair fund, Thalberg says in a threatening tone: “I hate to think what L.B. [Louis B. Mayer] might do he he finds out that you’re the only holdout.”

Mank replies defiantly, “You don’t need my donation! You don’t need anybody’s donation. You can make the world swear that King Kong is 10 stories tall and Mary Pickford is a virgin at 40, yet you can’t convince starving Californians that a turncoat Socialist is a menace to everything they hold dear. You’re barely trying.” Mank then walks out of Thalberg’s office like a future rapper who just dropped the mic.

On election night at the Trocadero nightclub, where a crowd is gathered to listen to the election results, a drunken Mank makes a $24,000 bet on who will win. It’s the kind of money that he knows could ruin him financially, but he bets it all anyway. Viewers of this movie who know who won the election in real life can easily guess which of the candidates got Mank’s support and how this scene ends.

There’s a minor subplot of how his younger brother Joe feels overshadowed by Mank. Joe is also the more cautious brother who expresses concerns to Mank about the repercussions that Mank will get from Hearst over the “Citizen Kane” screenplay. “Self-preservation is not politics,” warns Joe. Mank doesn’t seem to care. He replies, “I’m washed up, Joe. I have been for years.”

Despite this scene where the Mankiewicz brothers have this candid talk, the brotherly dynamic is often shunted aside, since this movie is just what the title says it is: It’s ultimately all about Mank. His wife is treated as a marginal character, while his children Don and Johanna have no bearing on the plot and are briefly in the movie.

Throughout the movie, Mank seems proud of his disruptive reputation, with the type of bravado of someone who knows he is not the target of racism and sexism. Mank was Jewish, but it’s implied throughout the story that because most of the major Hollywood studios at the time were owned by Jewish men, Mank didn’t get the type of anti-Semitism that he would’ve gotten if he worked in an industry that wasn’t controlled at the time by people who weren’t Jewish.

The movie is intent on making Mank look like a lovable rogue, without any real examination of how his awful actions might have damaged other people. “Mank” gives him somewhat of a “see, he’s not that bad” redemption arc when it’s revealed that he did an act of kindness to help his German immigrant employee named Fraulein Freda (played by Monika Grossman) by sponsoring her German family to live in the United States. When typist Rita is ready to quit in frustration over Mank’s heavy drinking, Freda tells her about Mank’s immigration assistance and that he’s a “good man.”

However, it can be argued that an act of kindness is truly noble when the person committing the act won’t get anything out of it in return. Would Mank have gone to the trouble of helping Freda if she didn’t work for him and if he didn’t need to use her services in some way? Viewers can make up their own minds about Mank’s character by other actions he takes in the movie.

Although “Mank” doesn’t goes as far to say that Mank and Davies had a sexual affair, the movie shows that the two did have some kind of intimate emotional affair. After all, Davies is shown as the one who gave Mank a lot of personal information about Hearst that ended up being used for the Kane character in “Citizen Kane.” As for why Sara stayed married to Mank, she tells him what she thinks of their marriage: “It’s never boring. Exhausting? Yes.”

People watching “Mank” might be surprised by how the character of Welles doesn’t have as much screen time as expected for a movie about the pre-production of “Citizen Kane.” And it’s too bad that Welles is only in the movie for about 15 minutes, because the showdown between Welles and Mank is one of the best scenes in the film. The two men have an explosive argument when Mank tells Welles that he wants co-writing credit for the screenplay.

It’s a battle of egos and power. Welles was a hotshot filmmaker at age 24 when he was given complete creative control over “Citizen Kane” in his contract with RKO Pictures. And he was very arrogant about it, by all accounts. Mank, who was 42 or 43 when he completed the “Citizen Kane” screenplay, had the advantage of being more experienced in Hollywood.

Mank declares to Welles during their argument: “I may be a loose cannon, but you, my friend, are the outsider.” Welles shouts back: “Who’s producing this picture? Directing in it? Starring in it?”

One of the better aspects of “Mank” is it that perfectly captures the tone, pace and voice cadence of movies from the 1930s and 1940s. It looks like a movie that could have been made back then, except the pristine technical aspects (such as the film editing) make it clear that the movie benefited from modern technology. “Mank” uses an eye-catching technique of identifying the year and location of each new scene by showing this information on screen as typing on a paper script with one of the era’s typewriters.

“Mank” director Fincher has immense talent for his attention to detail, when it comes to production design, costume design, a film’s visuals and getting the best that he can out of the cast members in the movie. Those superb qualities make “Mank” worth watching for people who want to immerse themselves in Old Hollywood. However, many of Fincher’s films have main characters who are selfish and/or obsessive to the point where much of their humanity is lost. And that is one of the main reasons why some people will want to avoid watching “Mank.”

Netflix released “Mank” in select U.S. cinemas on November 13, 2020. The movie premiered on Netflix on December 4, 2020.

2021 Golden Globe Awards: ‘Mank’ is the top nominee

February 3, 2021

by Carla Hay

Amanda Seyfried and Gary Oldman in “Mank” (Photo courtesy of Netflix)

With six nominations, Netflix’s movie-industry drama “Mank” is the leading contender for the 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards, which will be presented on February 28, 2021. The Golden Globes ceremony has traditionally been held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be no large, in-person gathering at the ceremony. Instead, the Golden Globes ceremony will like do what other major live televised award shows have done when going virtual during the pandemic: There will most likely be video linkups of the nominees, so that when the winners are announced, the winners can react live with their acceptance speeches. Tina Fey and Amy Poehler will host the ceremony, with Fey at the Rainbow Room in New York City and Poehler at the Beverly Hilton.

NBC has the U.S. telecast of the show, which begins at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) votes for the nominations and awards. The HFPA and Dick Clark Productions are producing the Golden Globe Awards telecast. Eligible movies for the show were those released in the U.S. in 2020 and in January and February 2021. The eligibility window, which usually ends at the end of a calendar year, was extended for movies because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Eligible TV programs were those that premiered on U.S. networks and U.S. streaming services in 2020.

“Mank” tells the story of movie screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz (nicknamed Mank) and his experiences while he co-wrote the 1941 classic “Citizen Kane,” including his clashes with “Citizen Kane” director Orson Welles. “Mank” picked up expected nominations in the Motion Picture – Drama categories: Best Picture and Best Actor (Gary Oldman). The other “Mank” nominations are for Best Director (David Fincher), Best Screenplay (the late Jack Fincher, David’s father), Best Supporting Actress (Amanda Seyfried) and Best Original Score (Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross). Another movie contender with multiple nominations is Netflix’s “The Trial of the Chicago 7,” with five nods. Focus Features’ “Promising Young Woman,” Sony Pictures Classics’ “The Father” and Searchlight Pictures’ “Nomadland” have four nominations each. “One Night in Miami…” and “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” (both from Amazon Studios) earned three nods each.

For the television categories, the leading contender is Netflix’s “The Crown,” which received six nominations, including Best Television Series – Drama. Following closely behind is the Pop network’s comedy series “Schitt’s Creek,” which scored five nominations, including Best Television Series – Comedy. The Netflix drama series “Ozark,” the HBO limited series “The Undoing” and the Netflix limited series “Ratched” received four nominations each.

Snubs and Surprises

Filmmaker Spike Lee and actors Isiah Whitlock Jr., Delroy Lindo, Jonathan Majors, Clarke Peters and Norm Lewis on the set of “Da 5 Bloods” (Photo by David Lee/Netflix)

The most noticeable Golden Globes snub this year was Netflix’s award-winning, critically acclaimed drama movie “Da 5 Bloods” (directed and co-written by Spike Lee), which failed to get any Golden Globe nominations. “Da 5 Bloods” told a fictional story about four African American military veterans of the Vietnam War who go back to Vietnam to look for hidden treasure. Other movies that have been shut out of the Golden Globes race are the Focus Features drama “Never Rarely Sometimes Always,” the A24 drama “First Cow” and the Netflix comedy “The Forty-Year-Old Version,” which have all received several nominations and some wins at independent film awards. Golden Globe TV snubs this year included the Hulu limited drama series “Little Fires Everywhere” and the HBO comedy series “Insecure,” which each received several Emmy nods. Also shut out was the HBO limited drama series “I May Destroy You.”

In terms of surprises, some movies picked up their first major award nominations, despite being shut out of earlier award shows for which they were eligible. Vertical Entertainment’s “Music” is one such example, by receiving two Golden Globe nods in the Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy field: Best Picture and Best Actress (Kate Hudson). Netflix’s star-studded musical “The Prom,” which got mixed reviews from critics and audiences, also scored two nods in the Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy field: Best Picture and Best Actor (James Corden). After getting snubbed in major Emmy Awards categories in 2020, Hulu’s comedy series “The Great” did better than expected at the Golden Globes for the “The Great’s” first season: “The Great” scored three nominations in the Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy field: Best Television Series, Best Actress (Elle Fanning) and Best Actor (Nicholas Hoult).

Diversity and Inclusion

Daveed Diggs, Okieriete Onaodowan, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom Jr. and Anthony Ramos in “Hamilton” (Photo courtesy of Disney+)

In terms of diversity, the Golden Globes ended a long drought of not nominating any female directors. This year, women are three of the five Best Director nominees: Chloé Zhao for “Nomadland,” Regina King for “One Night in Miami …” and Emerald Fennell for “Promising Young Woman.” Zhao and Fennell are also nominees in another traditionally male-dominated Golden Globes category: Best Screenplay.

The major movie categories each had at least one person of color as a nominee, except for two categories: Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy and Best Supporting Actress. Black people are the people of color with the highest representation this year.

In the movie categories, there are nominations for “One Night in Miami…” and Netflix’s “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” which are both based on plays written by and about African Americans. “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” has two nominations in the Motion Picture – Drama field: Best Actress (for Viola Davis) and Best Actor (for the late Chadwick Boseman). Daniel Kaluuya’s portrayal of Black Panther activist Fred Hampton in Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Judas and the Black Messiah” garnered a nod for Best Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture. “The United States vs. Billie Holiday,” earned two nominations for star Andra Day: Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama and Best Original Song. In the category of Best Original Song, three of the five nominated songs were written and performed by African Americans: Day’s “Tigress & Tweed”; Leslie Odom Jr.’s “Speak Now” (from “One Night in Miami…”); and H.E.R.’s “Fight for You” (from “Judas and the Black Messiah”).

STX’s “The Mauritanian,” which is about a suspected terrorist imprisoned in Cuba’s Guantanamo Bay, stars Algerian French actor Tahar Rahim, who is nominated for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama.

Asian representation at the Golden Globes this year is mostly from “Nomadland” filmmaker Zhao, who is nominated as a director, producer and screenwriter for the film. Riz Ahmed, who is of Pakistani British heritage, is nominated for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama, for his role in Amazon Studios’ “Sound of Metal,” where he portrays an American heavy metal drummer who goes deaf. Indian British actor Dev Patel of Searchlight Pictures’ “The Personal History of David Copperfield” got a nod for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. A24’s “Minari,” about a Korean American family who moves to rural Arkansas, is nominated for Best Foreign Language Film.

Latinos, who were mostly shut out of the Golden Globes this year, are represented only by Shudder’s Guatemalan horror movie “La Llorona” (nominated for Best Foreign Language Film) and by “Hamilton” star/creator Lin-Manuel Miranda (who is Puerto Rican American descent), who got nominations for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, while “Hamilton” (which has a multiracial cast) was nominated for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. “Hamilton,” which is a filmed 2016 performance of the Tony-winning musical, is available exclusively on the Disney+ streaming service and is not eligible for the Oscars because the movie was never released in theaters.

People of color are underrepresented in the TV categories. Almost all of the nominees are white in most of the TV categories this year. Black people got the most nominations in the the TV categories because of Amazon Prime Video’s limited series “Small Axe” (about Caribbean immigrant life in England), which picked up two nods: Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television, while “Small Axe” star John Boyega is nominated for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television.

African American actor Don Cheadle of Showtime’s “Black Monday” is nominated for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy. HBO’s “Lovecraft Country,” which has a predominantly African American cast, is up for Best Television Series – Drama, although that is the only Golden Globe nomination it received this year.

Egyptian American actor Ramy Youssef from Hulu’s “Ramy” is nominated for Best Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy, an award he won in 2020. Native Americans, who are severely underrepresented in entertainment, received no nominations in any of the Golden Globe categories this year.

Portrayals of the disabled community are in nominated performances by Ahmed in “Sound of Metal” (about a musician who goes deaf) and Anthony Hopkins as a man with dementia in Sony Pictures Classics’ “The Father.” Vertical Entertainment’s “Music,” about a recovering addict (played by Kate Hudson) raising her autistic teenage half-sister named Music (played by Maddie Ziegler), has sparked criticism over how autism is portrayed by Ziegler, who is not autistic, and for a controversial scene in which the autistic person is physically restrained. In television, Emmy-winning “I Know This Must Be True” star Mark Ruffalo portrays identical twins, one of whom has schizophrenia. For his role in this HBO limited drama series, Ruffalo is nominated for Best Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television.

The LGBTQ community is represented in the movie categories with the musical “The Prom,” which is about a lesbian teenager who wants go to her school prom with her girlfriend. “The Prom,” directed and produced by Ryan Murphy (who is openly gay), is nominated for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, while James Corden (who plays a gay character in the movie) is nominated for Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. The French drama “Two of Us,” about two elderly lesbians, is nominated for Best International Film. And, as previously mentioned, “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” star Davis (who portrays lesbian singer Ma Rainey) and “The United States vs. Billie Holiday” star Day (who depicts bisexual singer Billie Holiday) are each nominated for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama.

In television, the Murphy-produced Netflix limited series “Ratched” earned nominations for lead actress Sarah Paulson and supporting actress Cynthia Nixon, who are both openly lesbian/queer. Murphy is also nominated as an executive producer for “Ratched,” which is a contender for Best Television Series – Drama. Meanwhile, openly gay actor/writer/producer Dan Levy earned two nominations for “Schitt’s Creek”: Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy and Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television. “Schitt’s Creek” (which has its series finale on the Pop Network in 2020) swept all the major categories for comedy TV series at the 2020 Emmy Awards, so it will be interesting to see how well “Schitt’s Creek” does at the Golden Globes.

Here is the complete list of nominations for the 2021 Golden Globe Awards:

MOVIES

Best Motion Picture – Drama
“The Father” (Sony Pictures Classics)
“Mank” (Netflix)
“Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)
“Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features)
“The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm” (Amazon Studios)
“Hamilton” (Disney+)
“Palm Springs” (Neon/Hulu)
“Music” (Vertical Entertainment)
“The Prom” (Netflix)

Best Director 
Emerald Fennell, “Promising Young Woman”
David Fincher, “Mank” (Netflix)
Regina King, “One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios)
Aaron Sorkin, “The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix)
Chloé Zhao, “Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Riz Ahmed (“Sound of Metal”)
Chadwick Boseman (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”)
Anthony Hopkins (“The Father”)
Gary Oldman (“Mank”)
Tahar Rahim (“The Mauritanian”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Sacha Baron Cohen (“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm”)
James Corden (“The Prom”)
Lin-Manuel Miranda (“Hamilton”)
Dev Patel (“The Personal History of David Copperfield”)
Andy Samberg (“Palm Springs”)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Viola Davis (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”)
Andra Day (“The United States vs. Billie Holiday”)
Vanessa Kirby (“Pieces of a Woman”)
Frances McDormand (“Nomadland”)
Carey Mulligan (“Promising Young Woman”)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Maria Bakalova (“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm”)
Kate Hudson (“Music”)
Michelle Pfeiffer (“French Exit”)
Rosamund Pike (“I Care a Lot”)
Anya Taylor-Joy (“Emma”)

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture
Sacha Baron Cohen (“The Trial of the Chicago 7”)
Daniel Kaluuya (“Judas and the Black Messiah”)
Jared Leto (“The Little Things”)
Bill Murray (“On the Rocks”)
Leslie Odom Jr. (“One Night in Miami”)

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture 
Glenn Close (“Hillbilly Elegy”)
Olivia Colman (“The Father”)
Jodie Foster (“The Mauritanian”)
Amanda Seyfried (“Mank”)
Helena Zengel (“News of the World”)

Best Screenplay
“Promising Young Woman” (Focus Features) – Emerald Fennell
“Mank” (Netflix) – Jack Fincher
“The Trial of the Chicago 7” (Netflix) – Aaron Sorkin
“The Father” (Sony Pictures Classics) – Florian Zeller and Christopher Hampton
“Nomadland” (Searchlight Pictures) – Chloé Zhao

Best Original Score
“The Midnight Sky” – Alexandre Desplat
“Tenet” – Ludwig Göransson
“News of the World” – James Newton Howard
“Mank” – Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
“Soul” – Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, Jon Batiste

Best Original Song 
“Fight for You” from “Judas and the Black Messiah” – H.E.R., Dernst Emile II, Tiara Thomas
“Hear My Voice” from “The Trial of the Chicago 7” – Daniel Pemberton, Celeste
“Io Si (Seen)” from “The Life Ahead” – Diane Warren, Laura Pausini, Niccolò Agliardi
“Speak Now” from “One Night in Miami” (Amazon Studios) – Leslie Odom Jr, Sam Ashworth
“Tigress & Tweed” from “The United States vs. Billie Holliday” (Hulu) – Andra Day, Raphael Saadiq

Best Animated Film 
“The Croods: A New Age” (DreamWorks Animation/Universal Pictures)
“Onward” (Pixar Amination Studios/Disney)
“Over the Moon” (Netflix)
“Soul” (Pixar Animation Studios/Disney)
“Wolfwalkers” (Cartoon Saloon/Apple TV+)

Best Foreign Language Film
“Another Round” (Samuel Goldwyn Films)
“La Llorona” (Shudder)
“The Life Ahead” (Netflix)
“Minari” (A24)
“Two of Us” (Magnolia Pictures)

TELEVISION

Best Television Series – Drama
“The Crown” (Netflix)
“Lovecraft Country” (HBO)
“The Mandalorian” (Disney Plus)
“Ozark” (Netflix)
“Ratched” (Netflix)

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
“Emily in Paris” (Netflix)
“The Flight Attendant” (HBO Max)
“The Great” (Hulu)
“Schitt’s Creek” (Pop)
“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)

Best Actor in a Television Series – Drama
Jason Bateman (“Ozark”)
Josh O’Connor (“The Crown”)
Bob Odenkirk (“Better Call Saul”)
Al Pacino (“Hunters”)
Matthew Rhys (“Perry Mason”)

Best Actress in a Television Series – Drama
Olivia Colman (“The Crown”)
Jodie Comer (“Killing Eve”)
Emma Corrin (“The Crown”)
Laura Linney (“Ozark”)
Sarah Paulson (“Ratched”)

Best Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Don Cheadle (“Black Monday”)
Nicholas Hoult (“The Great”)
Eugene Levy (“Schitt’s Creek”)
Jason Sudeikis (“Ted Lasso”)
Ramy Youssef (“Ramy”)

Best Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Lily Collins (“Emily in Paris”)
Kaley Cuoco (“The Flight Attendant”)
Elle Fanning (“The Great”)
Jane Levy (“Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist”)
Catherine O’Hara (“Schitt’s Creek”)

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
“Normal People” (Hulu/BBC)
“The Queen’s Gambit” (Netflix)
“Small Axe” (Amazon Prime Video/BBC)
“The Undoing” (HBO)
“Unorthodox” (Netflix)

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Bryan Cranston (“Your Honor”)
Jeff Daniels (“The Comey Rule”)
Hugh Grant (“The Undoing”)
Ethan Hawke (“The Good Lord Bird”)
Mark Ruffalo (“I Know This Much Is True”)

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Cate Blanchett (“Mrs. America”)
Daisy Edgar-Jones (“Normal People”)
Shira Haas (“Unorthodox”)
Nicole Kidman (“The Undoing”)
Anya Taylor-Joy (“The Queen’s Gambit”)

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
John Boyega (“Small Axe”)
Brendan Gleeson (“The Comey Rule”)
Dan Levy (“Schitt’s Creek”)
Jim Parsons (“Hollywood”)
Donald Sutherland (“The Undoing”)

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Gillian Anderson (“The Crown”)
Helena Bonham Carter (“The Crown”)
Julia Garner (“Ozark”)
Annie Murphy (“Schitt’s Creek”)
Cynthia Nixon (“Ratched”)