2022 Academy Awards: ‘CODA’ wins three Oscars, including Best Picture; ‘Dune’ wins six Oscars

March 27, 2022

by Carla Hay

Members of the “CODA” team at the 94th annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on March 27, 2022. Pictured from left to right: producer Patrick Wachsberger, actor Eugenios Derbez, writer/director Siân Heder, actress Marlee Matlin, actor Troy Kotsur, actress Emilia Jones, actress Daniel Durant, actress Amy Forsyth, producer Philippe Rousselet and producer Fabrice Gianfereme. (Photo courtesy of ABC)

With three prizes, including Best Picture, Apple TV+’s drama “CODA” made Oscar history by being the first movie from a streaming service and the first movie with several deaf actors to win Best Picture. This historic victory happened at the 94th annual Academy Awards, which were presented at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on March 27, 2022. Regina Hall, Amy Schumer and Wanda Sykes hosted the show, which was telecast in the U.S. on ABC. Eligible movies were those released in U.S. theaters between March 1 and December 31, 2021. The nominations and awards are voted for by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

Troy Kotsur of “CODA” also made history by becoming the first deaf male actor to win an Oscar. Kotsur took the prize for Best Supporting Actor. Marlee Matlin, who was the first deaf actress to win an Oscar (Best Actress for 1986’s “Children of a Lesser God”), also starred in “CODA.” Kotsur and Matlin portray a married couple in “CODA,” an acronym for “child of dead adults.”

In “CODA,” a hearing teenager named Ruby Rossi (played by Emilia Jones) has parents named Frank and Jackie (played by Kotsur and Matlin) and an older brother named Leo (played by Daniel Durant), who are all deaf. Ruby has to decide if she will stay in their hometown of Gloucester, Massachusetts, to help in the family’s fishing business or pursue her dream of being a singer at Berklee College of Music.

“CODA” is a remake of the 2014 French film “La Famille Bélier,” thereby making “CODA” the second movie remake (after 2006’s “The Departed”) to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Unlike “La Famille Bélier,” which cast hearing actors as deaf people, “CODA” had deaf cast members in the roles of deaf people. “CODA” won all three of the Oscars for which it was nominated. In addition to Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor, the Oscar haul for “CODA” included Best Adapted Screenplay. “CODA” director Siân Heder adapted the screenplay.

Warner Bros. Pictures’ sci-fi remake of “Dune” won six of its 10 Oscar nominations: Best Film Editing, Best Cinematography, Production Design, Best Sound, Best Original Score and Best Visual Effects. Netflix’s Western drama “The Power of the Dog” went into the ceremony with the most nominations (12) and ended up winning just one: Best Director, for Jane Campion. The only other movie to win more than one Oscar at the ceremony was Searchlight Pictures’ Tammy Faye Bakker biopic “The Eyes of Tammy Faye”: Jessica Chastain won Best Actress, and the movie won the prize for Best Makeup and Hairstyling.

Ariana DeBose, Troy Kotsur and Jessica Chastain at the 94th annual Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on March 27, 2022. (Photo courtesy of ABC)

Ariana DeBose became the first openly queer woman to win an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She won the prize for playing the role of Anita in the 2021 remake of “West Side Story,” which was DeBose’s acting debut in a feature film. It was the same role for which Rita Moreno won a history-making Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1961’s “West Side Story,” which made Moreno the first Latin person to win an Oscar. Moreno attended the Oscar ceremony in 2022, and she looked on with pride and joy when DeBose took the stage to accept the award.

Despite all the accolades during the show, it will probably be most remembered for an unscripted moment when “King Richard” star Will Smith went on stage and punched presenter Chris Rock in the face, after Rock made an insulting joke about Smith’s wife, Jada Pinkett Smith, looking like G.I. Jane because of her close-cropped, shaved head. Pinkett Smith went public in 2021 about shaving her head because she has alopecia, a condition which causes large clumps of hair on a head to fall out. Rock was on stage to present the award for Best Documentary Feature. According to Variety, Smith also yelled Rock after slapping him: “Keep my wife’s name out of your fucking mouth!”

This surprising altercation, which was followed by spurts of audio blocking and other technical interruptions to TV audiences, happened about 30 minutes before Smith won Best Actor for “King Richard,” in which he portrays Richard “Richie” Williams, the father and first tennis coach for tennis superstars Venus Williams and Serena Williams. Smith gave a tearful acceptance speech about protecting his family and being called to spread love.

Smith also said during the speech: “I want to apologize to the Academy. I want to apologize to all my fellow nominees. This is a beautiful moment and I’m not crying for winning an award. It’s not about winning an award for me. It’s about being able to shine a light on all of the people.” The Smith/Rock altercation is bound to be ranked as one of the most notorious moments in Oscar history.*

Other presenters at the show were Serena Williams, Venus Williams, Daniel Kaluuya, H.E.R., Josh Brolin, Jason Momoa, Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Rosie Perez, Jacob Elordi, Rachel Zegler, Tony Hawk, Kelly Slater, Shaun White, Stephanie Beatriz, Halle Bailey, Lily James and Naomi Scott, Naomi Scott, Tiffany Haddish, Simu Liu, Mila Kunis, Ruth E. Carter, Lupita Nyong’o, John Leguizamo, Jennifer Garner, Elliot Page J.K. Simmons, Shawn Mendes, Tracee Ellis Ross, Rami Malek, Tyler Perry, Jamie Lee Curtis, Bill Murray, Jill Scott, Sean Combs, Zoë Kravitz, Jake Gyllenhaal, Kevin Costner, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, John Travolta, Anthony Hopkins, Lady Gaga and Liza Minnelli.

There were also performances of four of the five songs competing in the Best Original Son category: Beyoncé opened the show with her Oscar-nominated “Be Alive” from “King Richard,” by performing the song at a tennis court in Compton, California, as a nod to where Venus Williams and Serena Williams got their start. Sebastián Yatra sang “Dos Oruguitas” from “Encanto.” Reba McEntire sang “Somehow You Do” from “Four Good Days.” Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell performed the title track to “No Time to Die,” which won the Oscar. Van Due to touring commitments, Morrison did not attend the ceremony to perform his Oscar-nominated song “Down to Joy.” Instead, there was a performance of the “Encanto” hit song “We Don’t Talk About Bruno” by members of the “Encanto” cast with a special guest appearance by Megan Thee Stallion.

*April 1, 2022 UPDATE: After much controversy and media coverage of Smith’s physical assault of Rock at this Oscar ceremony, Smith has resigned from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science. Read the full story here.

*April 8, 2022 UPDATE: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced that it is banning Smith from all Academy events for 10 years. Read the full story here.

Here is the complete list of winners and nominations for the 2022 Academy Awards:

*=winner

Best Picture

“Belfast,” Laura Berwick, Kenneth Branagh, Becca Kovacik and Tamar Thomas, producers

“CODA,” Philippe Rousselet, Fabrice Gianfermi and Patrick Wachsberger, producers*

“Don’t Look Up,” Adam McKay and Kevin Messick, producers

“Drive My Car,” Teruhisa Yamamoto, producer

“Dune,” Mary Parent, Denis Villeneuve and Cale Boyter, producers

“King Richard,” Tim White, Trevor White and Will Smith, producers

“Licorice Pizza,” Sara Murphy, Adam Somner and Paul Thomas Anderson, producers

“Nightmare Alley,” Guillermo del Toro, J. Miles Dale and Bradley Cooper, producers

“The Power of the Dog,” Jane Campion, Tanya Seghatchian, Emile Sherman, Iain Canning and Roger Frappier, producers

“West Side Story,” Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger, producers

Best Director

Kenneth Branagh (“Belfast”)

Ryûsuke Hamaguchi (“Drive My Car”)

Paul Thomas Anderson (“Licorice Pizza”)

Jane Campion (“The Power of the Dog”)*

Steven Spielberg (“West Side Story”)

Best Actor in a Leading Role

Javier Bardem (“Being the Ricardos”)

Benedict Cumberbatch (“The Power of the Dog”)

Andrew Garfield (“Tick, Tick … Boom!”)

Will Smith (“King Richard”)*

Denzel Washington (“The Tragedy of Macbeth”)

Best Actress in a Leading Role

Jessica Chastain (“The Eyes of Tammy Faye”)*

Olivia Colman (“The Lost Daughter”)

Penélope Cruz (“Parallel Mothers”)

Nicole Kidman (“Being the Ricardos”)

Kristen Stewart (“Spencer”)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Ciarán Hinds (“Belfast”)

Troy Kotsur (“CODA”)*

Jesse Plemons (“The Power of the Dog”)

J.K. Simmons (“Being the Ricardos”)

Kodi Smit-McPhee (“The Power of the Dog”)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Jessie Buckley (“The Lost Daughter”)

Ariana DeBose (“West Side Story”)*

Judi Dench (“Belfast”)

Kirsten Dunst (“The Power of the Dog”)

Aunjanue Ellis (“King Richard”)

Best Adapted Screenplay

“CODA,” screenplay by Siân Heder*

“Drive My Car,” screenplay by Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Takamasa Oe

“Dune,” screenplay by Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve and Eric Roth

“The Lost Daughter,” written by Maggie Gyllenhaal

“The Power of the Dog,” written by Jane Campion

Best Original Screenplay

“Belfast,” written by Kenneth Branagh*

“Don’t Look Up,” screenplay by Adam McKay; story by Adam McKay and David Sirota

“King Richard,” written by Zach Baylin

“Licorice Pizza,” written by Paul Thomas Anderson

“The Worst Person in the World,” written by Eskil Vogt, Joachim Trier

Best Cinematography

“Dune,” Greig Fraser*

“Nightmare Alley,” Dan Laustsen

“The Power of the Dog,” Ari Wegner

“The Tragedy of Macbeth,” Bruno Delbonnel

“West Side Story,” Janusz Kaminski

Best Film Editing

“Don’t Look Up,” Hank Corwin

“Dune,” Joe Walker*

“King Richard”, Pamela Martin

“The Power of the Dog,” Peter Sciberras

“Tick, Tick…Boom!” Myron Kerstein and Andrew Weisblum

Best Sound

“Belfast,” Denise Yarde, Simon Chase, James Mather and Niv Adiri

“Dune,” Mac Ruth, Mark Mangini, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett*

“No Time to Die,” Simon Hayes, Oliver Tarney, James Harrison, Paul Massey and Mark Taylor

“The Power of the Dog,” Richard Flynn, Robert Mackenzie and Tara Webb

“West Side Story,” Tod A. Maitland, Gary Rydstrom, Brian Chumney, Andy Nelson and Shawn Murphy

Best Original Score

“Don’t Look Up,” Nicholas Britell

“Dune,” Hans Zimmer*

“Encanto,” Germaine Franco

“Parallel Mothers,” Alberto Iglesias

“The Power of the Dog,” Jonny Greenwood

Best Original Song

“Be Alive” from “King Richard,” music and lyric by Dixson and Beyoncé Knowles-Carter

“Dos Oruguitas” from “Encanto,” music and lyric by Lin-Manuel Miranda

“Down to Joy” from “Belfast,” music and lyric by Van Morrison

“No Time to Die” from “No Time to Die,” music and lyric by Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell*

“Somehow You Do” from “Four Good Days,” music and lyric by Diane Warren

Best Animated Feature Film

“Encanto,” Jared Bush, Byron Howard, Yvett Merino and Clark Spencer*

“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie

“Luca,” Enrico Casarosa and Andrea Warren

“The Mitchells vs. the Machines,” Mike Rianda, Phil Lord, Christopher Miller and Kurt Albrecht

“Raya and the Last Dragon,” Don Hall, Carlos López Estrada, Osnat Shurer and Peter Del Vecho

Best International Feature Film

“Drive My Car” (Japan)*

“Flee” (Denmark)

“The Hand of God” (Italy)

“Lunana: A Yak in the Classroom” (Bhutan)

“The Worst Person in the World” (Norway)

Best Documentary Feature

“Ascension,” Jessica Kingdon, Kira Simon-Kennedy and Nathan Truesdell

“Attica,” Stanley Nelson and Traci A. Curry

“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie

“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised),” Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, Joseph Patel, Robert Fyvolent and David Dinerstein*

“Writing With Fire,” Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

“Coming 2 America,” Mike Marino, Stacey Morris and Carla Farmer

“Cruella,” Nadia Stacey, Naomi Donne and Julia Vernon

“Dune,” Donald Mowat, Love Larson and Eva von Bahr

“The Eyes of Tammy Faye,” Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram and Justin Raleigh*

“House of Gucci,” Göran Lundström, Anna Carin Lock and Frederic Aspiras

Best Costume Design

“Cruella,” Jenny Beavan*

“Cyrano,” Massimo Cantini Parrini and Jacqueline Durran

“Dune,” Jacqueline West and Robert Morgan

“Nightmare Alley,” Luis Sequeira

“West Side Story,” Paul Tazewell

Best Production Design

“Dune,” production design: Patrice Vermette; set decoration: Zsuzsanna Sipos*

“Nightmare Alley,” production design: Tamara Deverell; set decoration: Shane Vieau

“The Power of the Dog,” production design: Grant Major; set decoration: Amber Richards

“The Tragedy of Macbeth,” production design: Stefan Dechant; set decoration: Nancy Haigh

“West Side Story,” production design: Adam Stockhausen; set decoration: Rena DeAngelo

Best Visual Effects

“Dune,” Paul Lambert, Tristan Myles, Brian Connor and Gerd Nefzer*

“Free Guy,” Swen Gillberg, Bryan Grill, Nikos Kalaitzidis and Dan Sudick

“No Time to Die,” Charlie Noble, Joel Green, Jonathan Fawkner and Chris Corbould

“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings,” Christopher Townsend, Joe Farrell, Sean Noel Walker and Dan Oliver

“Spider-Man: No Way Home,” Kelly Port, Chris Waegner, Scott Edelstein and Dan Sudick

Best Documentary Short Subject

“Audible,” Matt Ogens and Geoff McLean

“Lead Me Home,” Pedro Kos and Jon Shenk

“The Queen of Basketball,” Ben Proudfoot*

“Three Songs for Benazir,” Elizabeth Mirzaei and Gulistan Mirzaei

“When We Were Bullies,” Jay Rosenblatt

Best Animated Short Film

“Affairs of the Art,” Joanna Quinn and Les Mills

“Bestia,” Hugo Covarrubias and Tevo Díaz

“Boxballet,” Anton Dyakov

“Robin Robin,” Dan Ojari and Mikey Please

“The Windshield Wiper,” Alberto Mielgo and Leo Sanchez*

Best Live-Action Short Film

“Ala Kachuu – Take and Run,” Maria Brendle and Nadine Lüchinger

“The Dress,” Tadeusz Łysiak and Maciej Ślesicki

“The Long Goodbye,” Aneil Karia and Riz Ahmed*

“On My Mind,” Martin Strange-Hansen and Kim Magnusson

“Please Hold,” K.D. Dávila and Levin Menekse

2022 BAFTA Film Awards: ‘Power of the Dog,’ ‘Dune’ are the top winners

March 13, 2022

Netflix’s Western drama “The Power of the Dog” and Warner Bros. Pictures’ sci-fi remake “Dune” were the biggest winners at the 75th annual BAFTA Film Awards, which were presented at London’s Royal Albert Hall on March 13, 2022.z Rebel Wilson hosted the ceremony, which was televised in the United Kingdom on BBC and in the U.S. on BBC America. Eligible films were those released in the United Kingdom in 2021.

“The Power of the Dog” took the prize for Best Film, while Jane Campion received the Best Director prize for helming “The Power of the Dog.” Meanwhile, “Dune” went into the ceremony with the most nominations (11) and ended up winning five BAFTA Film Awards: Best Editing, Best Cinematography, Best Production Design, Best Sound and Best Visual Effects.

Here is the complete list of winners and nominations for the 2022 BAFTA Film Awards:

*=winner

Best Film

“Belfast”
“Don’t Look Up”
“Dune”
“Licorice Pizza”
“The Power of the Dog”*

Outstanding British Film

“After Love”
“Ali & Ava”
“Belfast”*
“Boiling Point”
“Cyrano”
“Everybody’s Talking About Jamie”
“House of Gucci”
“Last Night in Soho”
“No Time to Die”
“Passing”

Best Director

Aleem Khan, “After Love”
Ryûsuke Hamaguchi, “Drive My Car”
Audrey Diwan, “Happening
Paul Thomas Anderson, “Licorice Pizza”
Jane Campion, “The Power of the Dog”*
Julia Ducournau, “Titane”

Best Leading Actor

Adeel Akhtar, “Ali & Ava”
Mahershala Ali, “Swan Song”
Benedict Cumberbatch, “The Power of the Dog”
Leonardo DiCaprio, “Don’t Look Up”
Stephen Graham, “Boiling Point”
Will Smith, “King Richard”*

Best Leading Actress

Lady Gaga, “House of Gucci”
Alana Haim, “Licorice Pizza”
Emilia Jones, “CODA”
Renate Reinsve, “The Worst Person in the World”
Joanna Scanlan, “After Love”*
Tessa Thompson, “Passing”

Best Supporting Actor

Mike Faist, “West Side Story”
Ciarán Hinds, “Belfast”
Troy Kotsur, “CODA”*
Woody Norman, “C’mon C’mon”
Jesse Plemons, “The Power of the Dog”
Kodi Smit-McPhee, “The Power of the Dog”

Best Supporting Actress

Caitríona Balfe, “Belfast”
Jessie Buckley, “The Lost Daughter”
Ariana DeBose, “West Side Story”*
Ann Dowd, “Mass”
Aunjanue Ellis, “King Richard”
Ruth Negga, “Passing”

Best Adapted Screenplay

“CODA,” Siân Heder*
“Drive My Car,” Ryûsuke Hamaguchi
“Dune,” Eric Roth, Jon Spaihts, Denis Villeneuve
“The Lost Daughter,” Maggie Gyllenhaal
“The Power of the Dog,” Jane Campion

Best Original Screenplay

“Being the Ricardos,” Aaron Sorkin
“Belfast,” Kenneth Branagh
“Don’t Look Up,” Adam McKay
“King Richard,” Zach Baylin
“Licorice Pizza,” Paul Thomas Anderson*

Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer

“After Love,” Aleem Khan (writer/director)
“Boiling Point,” James Cummings (writer), Hester Ruoff (producer) [also written by Philip Barantini and produced by Bart Ruspoli]
“The Harder They Fall” – Jeymes Samuel (writer/director) [also written by Boaz Yakin]*
“Keyboard Fantasies” – Posy Dixon (writer/director), Liv Proctor (producer)
“Passing” – Rebecca Hall (writer/director)

Original Score

“Being the Ricardos,” Daniel Pemberton
“Don’t Look Up,” Nicholas Britell
“Dune,” Hans Zimmer*
“The French Dispatch,” Alexandre Desplat
“The Power of the Dog,” Jonny Greenwood

Cinematography

Dune,” Greig Fraser*
“Nightmare Alley,” Dan Laustsen
“No Time to Die,” Linus Sandgren
“The Power of the Dog,” Ari Wegner
“The Tragedy of Macbeth,” Bruno Delbonnel

Film Not in the English Language

“Drive My Car,” Ryûsuke Hamaguchi, Teruhisa Yamamoto*
“The Hand of God,” Paolo Sorrentino, Lorenzo Mieli
“Parallel Mothers,” Pedro Almodóvar, Agustín Almodóvar
“Petite Maman,” Céline Sciamma, Bénédicte Couvreur
“The Worst Person in the World,” Joachim Trier, Thomas Robsahm

Documentary

“Becoming Cousteau,” Liz Garbus, Dan Cogan
“Cow,” Andrea Arnold, Kat Mansoor
“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström
“The Rescue,” Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jimmy Chin, John Battsek, P. J. Van Sandwijk
“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised),” Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, David Dinerstein, Robert Fyvolent, Joseph Patel*

Animated Film

“Encanto,” Jared Bush, Byron Howard, Yvett Merino, Clarke Spencer*
“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen. Monica Hellström
“Luca,” Enrico Casarosa, Andrea Warren
“The Mitchells vs the Machines,” Mike Rianda, Phil Lord, Christopher Miller

Casting

“Boiling Point,” Carolyn Mcleod
“Dune,” Francine Maisler
“The Hand of God,” Massimo Appolloni, Annamaria Sambucco
“King Richard,” Rich Delia, Avy Kaufman
“West Side Story,” Cindy Tolan*

Production Design

“Cyrano,” Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
“Dune,” Patrice Vermette, Zsuzsanna Sipos*
“The French Dispatch,” Adam Stockhausen, Rena Deangelo
“Nightmare Alley,” Tamara Deverell, Shane Vieau
“West Side Story,” Adam Stockhausen, Rena Deangelo

Best Costume Design

“Cruella,” Jenny Beavan*
“Cyrano,” Massimo Cantini Parrini
“Dune,” Robert Morgan, Jacqueline West
“The French Dispatch,” Milena Canonero
“Nightmare Alley,” Luis Sequeira

Best Make Up and Hair

“Cruella,” Nadia Stacey, Naomi Donne
“Cyrano,” Alessandro Bertolazzi, Siân Miller
“Dune,” Love Larson, Donald Mowat
“The Eyes of Tammy Faye,” Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram, Justin Raleigh*
“House of Gucci,” Frederic Aspiras, Jane Carboni, Giuliano Mariana, Sarah Nicole Tanno

Best Editing

“Belfast,” Úna Ní Dhonghaíle
“Dune,” Joe Walker
“Licorice Pizza,” Andy Jurgensen
“No Time to Die,” Tom Cross, Elliot Graham*
“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised),” Joshua L. Pearson

Best Sound

“Dune,” Mac Ruth, Mark Mangini, Doug Hemphill, Theo Green, Ron Bartlett*
“Last Night in Soho,” Colin Nicolson, Julian Slater, Tim Cavagin, Dan Morgan
“No Time to Die,” James Harrison, Simon Hayes, Paul Massey, Oliver Tarney, Mark Taylor
“A Quiet Place Part II,” Erik Aadahl, Michael Barosky, Brandon Proctor, Ethan Van Der Ryn
“West Side Story,” Brian Chumney, Tod Maitland, Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom

Best Visual Effects

“Dune,” Brian Connor, Paul Lambert, Tristan Myles, Gerd Nefzer*
“Free Guy,” Swen Gillberg, Brian Grill, Nikos Kalaitzidis, Daniel Sudick
“Ghostbusters: Afterlife,” Aharon Bourland, Sheena Duggal, Pier Lefebvre, Alessandro Ongaro
“The Matrix Resurrections,” Tom Debenham, Hew J Evans, Dan Glass, J. D. Schwaim
“No Time to Die,” Mark Bokowski, Chris Corbould, Joel Green, Charlie Noble

British Short Animation

“Affairs of the Art,” Joanna Quinn, Les Mills
“Do Not Feed the Pigeons,” Jordi Morera*
“Night of the Living Dread,” Ida Melum, Danielle Goff, Laura Jayne Tunbridge, Hannah Kelso

British Short Film

“The Black Cop,” Cherish Oteka*
“Femme,” Sam H. Freeman, Ng Choon Ping, Sam Ritzenberg, Hayley Williams
“The Palace,” Jo Prichard
“Stuffed,” Theo Rhys, Joss Holden-rea
“Three Meetings of the Extraordinary Committee,” Michael Woodward, Max Barron, Daniel Wheldon

EE Rising Star Award (public vote)

Ariana DeBose
Harris Dickinson
Lashana Lynch*
Millicent Simmonds
Kodi Smit-McPhee

2022 Academy Awards: ‘The Power of the Dog’ is the top nominee

February 8, 2022

by Carla Hay

Kodi Smit-McPhee and Benedict Cumberbatch in “The Power of the Dog” (Photo by Kirsty Griffin/Netflix)

With 12 nods, the Netflix drama “The Power of the Dog” is the top nominee for the 94th Annual Academy Awards, which will take place at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on March 27, 2022. ABC will have the U.S. telecast of the show. The nominations were announced on February 8, 2022, by Tracee Ellis Ross and Leslie Jordan.

The nominations for “The Power of the Dog” are Best Picture; Best Actor (for Benedict Cumberbatch); Best Director (for Jane Campion); two nods for Best Supporting Actor (for Jesse Plemons and Kodi Smit-McPhee); Best Supporting Actress (for Kirsten Dunst); Best Adapted Screenplay; Best Film Editing; Best Cinematography; Best Production Design; Best Original Score; and Best Sound. The movie, which is set in 1925 Montana, is about a rancher family that is plagued by jealousy, toxic masculinity and homophobia. Dunst and Plemons are a couple in real life (and they portray a married couple in “The Power of the Dog”), so their nominations are a rare situation where a co-star couple received Oscar nominations for the same movie.

The other contenders for Best Picture are Focus Features’ “Belfast,” Apple Studios’ “CODA,” Netflix’s “Don’t Look Up,” Janus Films/Bitters End’s “Drive My Car,” Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Dune,” Warner Bros. Pictures’ “King Richard,” United Artists/Focus Features’ “Licorice Pizza,” Searchlight Pictures’ “Nightmare Alley” and 20th Century Studios’ “West Side Story.” The 2021 remake of “Dune” had the second-highest number of Oscar nominations this year (10 nods), followed by “Belfast” and “West Side Story,” which had seven nods each. (Click here to read Culture Mix’s reviews of all these movies that are nominated for Best Picture.)

The awards are voted for by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. For the 2022 ceremony, eligible movies were those released in the U.S. cinemas in 2021. As of 2022, the Academy is requiring the Best Picture category to have 10 nominees. From 2009 to 2021, the rule was that there could be five to 10 movies per year nominated for Best Picture.

Snubs and Surprises

Lady Gaga and Jared Leto in “House of Gucci” (Photo by Fabio Lovino/Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc.)

It’s been an unpredictable awards season for the Best Actress category. Lady Gaga of MGM/United Artists’ “House of Gucci” has been getting nominated at every major award ceremony for movies—except for the Academy Awards, where she was widely predicted to get a nomination. Meanwhile, Kristen Stewart of Neon’s “Spencer” was chosen by many awards pundits as an early frontrunner for a Best Actress Oscar, but Stewart’s performance in “Spencer” ultimately failed to get nominations at the Screen Actors Guild Awards and the BAFTA Film Awards—two major award shows that often indicate who will be Oscar winners and Oscar nominees. Despite those snubs, Stewart scored her first Oscar nomination for “Spencer,” when many awards pundits counted her out of the Oscar race because of the SAG and BAFTA snubs. Stewart’s nomination for Best Actress is the only Oscar nod for “Spencer.”

The category of Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress had a few snubs and surprises. Caitríona Balfe of “Belfast” was getting nominated at every major award show for movies—except for the Academy Awards. Instead, “Belfast” co-star Judi Dench got an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress, even though Dench was passed over in this category for “Belfast” at other major award shows. For “The Power of the Dog,” Best Supporting Actor nominee Smit-McPhee was widely predicted to get an Oscar nomination, but “Power of the Dog” co-star/Oscar nominee Plemons failed to get a Best Supporting Actor nod at other major awards shows, except for the BAFTAs. Meanwhile, Jared Leto of “House of Gucci” was shut out of an Oscar nomination for the Best Supporting Actor category for this movie. Leto has been nominated at other award shows for “House of Gucci,” which got an expected Oscar nomination for Best Makeup and Hairstyling that includes the much-talked-about prosthetic makeup that Leto wore in the movie. (It’s the only Oscar nod for “House of Gucci.”)

Movies that have been getting awards or nominations elsewhere were completely snubbed by the Academy Awards. They include the Netflix drama “Passing,” the Focus Features comedy “The French Dispatch,” the Netflix drama “The Harder They Fall” and the A24 drama “C’mon C’mon.” Movies that win the Academy Award for Best Picture always get a screenplay Oscar nomination too. That’s why “Nightmare Alley” and “West Side Story” (which are both remake films) have little or no chance to win Best Picture, since both movies failed to get Oscar nominations for Best Adapted Screenplay. In the category of Best Film Editing, “Belfast” and “West Side Story” were snubbed, even though both movies were widely predicted to get Oscar nods in that category. And although “Dune” earned a massive 10 Oscar nominations, one of them wasn’t for director Denis Villeneuve in the Best Director category, although he did get an expected Best Adapted Screenplay nod for co-writing the movie.

Some of the biggest surprise nominations came from international films. Neon’s Danish movie “Flee” (directed by Jonas Poher Rasmussen) made Oscar history for being the first movie to get Oscar nominations for Best International Feature Film, Best Animated Feature and Best Documentary Feature. While many pundits had floated the possibility that these three nominations would happen for “Flee,” many people predicted that “Flee” would get one or two Oscar nominations. “Flee” is an Afghan refugee’s first-hand account of his life, which is depicted in animated form. He currently lives in Denmark and used an alias in the movie to protect his privacy. Neon’s Norwegian drama “The Worst Person in the World” was expected to get a nomination for Best International Feature Film, but a surprise nomination came when the movie got an Oscar nod for Best Original Screenplay. “The Worst Person in the World” was written by Joachim Trier (the movie’s director) and Eskil Vogt.

Diversity and Inclusion

Aunjanue Ellis, Mikayla Bartholomew, Will Smith, Saniyya Sidney, Demi Singleton and Daniele Lawson in “King Richard” (Photo by Chiabella James/Warner Bros. Pictures)

“The Power of the Dog” director Campion made Academy Awards history, by becoming the first woman to get two Oscar nominations for Best Director. She was previously nominated for 1993’s “The Piano,” but lost the award to “Schindler’s List” director Steven Spielberg. It’s a rematch of sorts for Campion and “West Side Story” director Spielberg, since they’re both nominated again for Best Director in the same year. In another male-dominated category (Best Cinematography), Ari Wegner of “The Power of the Dog” became the second woman ever to get an Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography. The first woman to break this Best Cinematography gender barrier was Rachel Morrison, who was nominated for another Netflix period drama: 2017’s “Mudbound.”

Racial diversity is in every actor/actress category at 2022 Academy Awards, except for Best Supporting Actor. Black people are represented the most with “King Richard,” which has six nominations: Best Picture; Best Actor (for Will Smith); Best Supporting Actress (for Aunjanue Ellis); Best Original Screenplay; Best Film Editing; and Best Original Song (for Beyoncé’s “Be Alive”). “King Richard” is a biopic about Richard “Richie” Williams, the father and early coach of tennis superstars Venus Williams and Serena Williams.

Two African American-oriented films were nominated for Best Documentary Feature this year: Showtime’s “Attica” (directed by Stanley Nelson and Traci A. Curry) and Searchlight Pictures’ “Summer of Soul (…Or, The Revolution Could Not Be Televised”), directed by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson. Meanwhile, Denzel Washington scored his 10th Oscar nomination: Best Actor, for A24/Apple TV+’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth,” making him the most Oscar-nominated African American in Academy Awards history. Nine of his Oscar nominations are for acting, while one nomination is a Best Picture nod for being a producer of 2016’s “Fences.” Washington has won two Oscars: Best Actor (for 2001’s “Training Day”) and Best Supporting Actor (for 1989’s “Glory”).

Asians were represented the most with “Drive My Car,” a Japanese drama about a grieving widower who goes on a road trip with a young actress. “Drive My Car” earned four Oscar nods: Best Picture; Best Director (for Ryusuke Hamaguchi); Best Adapted Screenplay; and Best International Feature Film. As previously mentioned, “Flee” is about an Afghan refugee. Two other Asian-oriented movies were nominated for Best Documentary Feature: MTV Documentary Films’ “Ascension” (about consumerism in China) and Music Box Films’ “Writing With Fire” (about Indian female journalists). Chinese American director Jessica Kingdon is one of the nominees for “Ascension” while Indian American directors/producers Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh are nominated for “Writing With Fire.”

Disney’s “Raya and the Last Dragon,” which takes place in China and has an all-Asian cast, is nominated for Best Animated Feature, but none of the nominated producers and directors of the movie is Asian. Pakastani British entertainer Riz Ahmed, who got an Oscar nomination for Best Actor in 2021 for the Amazon Studios drama “Sound of Metal,” is nominated for an Oscar in 2022—this time, for being a producer of “The Long Goodbye,” which is nominated for Best Live-Action Short. Meanwhile, Indian American producer Joseph Patel is one of the Best Documentary Feature nominees for “Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised).”

Hispanic/Latino people nominated for Oscars this year included Oscar-winning spouses Javier Bardem of “Being the Ricardos” (Best Actor) and Penélope Cruz of “Parallel Mothers” (Best Actress); Guillermo del Toro (Best Picture), for being one of the producers of “Nightmare Alley”; “Parallel Mothers” composer Alberto Iglesias (Best Original Score); “Raya and the Last Dragon” co-director Carlos López Estrada (Best Animated Feature); and Ariana DeBose of “West Side Story” (Best Supporting Actress). DeBose, who is multiracial (Hispanic, African American and white) in real life, depicts a Puerto Rican in the 2021 remake of “West Side Story” and is the only cast member and the only person of color to get an Oscar nomination for the movie. “West Side Story” is a musical about racial tensions between white people and Puerto Ricans in early 1960s New York City.

Disney’s Colombian-oriented animated film “Encanto” picked up three nominations: Best Animated Feature (whose nominees includes Latina producer Yvett Marino); Best Original Song (for “Dos Oruguitas,” written by Lin-Manuel Miranda); and Best Original Score (for Germaine Franco, one of the few women ever nominated in this category). Meanwhile, there are Latino nominees in the short film categories: Best Animated Short nominees include writer/director Hugo Covarrubias and producer Tevo Díaz of “Bestia (Beast)” and writer/director Alberto Mielgo and producer Leo Sanchez of “The Windshield Wiper.” “Please Hold” director K.D. Dávila is nominated for Best Live-Action Short.

LGBTQ representation in the Oscar nominations can be found in the animated documentary “Flee” (whose subject is a gay Afghan refugee); Cruz’s queer character Janis Martínez Moreno in “Parallel Mothers” and Cumberbatch’s closeted gay character Phil Burbank in “The Power of the Dog.” In real life, Stewart of “Spencer” and DeBose of “West Side Story” identify as openly queer. The disabled community is represented by “CODA” (about a Massachusetts family of mostly deaf people), which got three nominations: Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor (for real-life deaf actor Troy Kotsur); and Best Adapted Screenplay. Meanwhile, Native American director/producer Ben Proudfoot of “The Queen of Basketball” is nominated for Best Documentary Short.

Here is the complete list of nominations for the 2022 Academy Awards:

Best Picture

“Belfast,” Laura Berwick, Kenneth Branagh, Becca Kovacik and Tamar Thomas, producers

“CODA,” Philippe Rousselet, Fabrice Gianfermi and Patrick Wachsberger, producers

“Don’t Look Up,” Adam McKay and Kevin Messick, producers

“Drive My Car,” Teruhisa Yamamoto, producer

“Dune,” Mary Parent, Denis Villeneuve and Cale Boyter, producers

“King Richard,” Tim White, Trevor White and Will Smith, producers

“Licorice Pizza,” Sara Murphy, Adam Somner and Paul Thomas Anderson, producers

“Nightmare Alley,” Guillermo del Toro, J. Miles Dale and Bradley Cooper, producers

“The Power of the Dog,” Jane Campion, Tanya Seghatchian, Emile Sherman, Iain Canning and Roger Frappier, producers

“West Side Story,” Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger, producers

Best Director

Kenneth Branagh (“Belfast”)

Ryûsuke Hamaguchi (“Drive My Car”)

Paul Thomas Anderson (“Licorice Pizza”)

Jane Campion (“The Power of the Dog”)

Steven Spielberg (“West Side Story”)

Best Actor in a Leading Role

Javier Bardem (“Being the Ricardos”)

Benedict Cumberbatch (“The Power of the Dog”)

Andrew Garfield (“Tick, Tick … Boom!”)

Will Smith (“King Richard”)

Denzel Washington (“The Tragedy of Macbeth”)

Best Actress in a Leading Role

Jessica Chastain (“The Eyes of Tammy Faye”)

Olivia Colman (“The Lost Daughter”)

Penélope Cruz (“Parallel Mothers”)

Nicole Kidman (“Being the Ricardos”)

Kristen Stewart (“Spencer”)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Ciarán Hinds (“Belfast”)

Troy Kotsur (“CODA”)

Jesse Plemons (“The Power of the Dog”)

J.K. Simmons (“Being the Ricardos”)

Kodi Smit-McPhee (“The Power of the Dog”)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Jessie Buckley (“The Lost Daughter”)

Ariana DeBose (“West Side Story”)

Judi Dench (“Belfast”)

Kirsten Dunst (“The Power of the Dog”)

Aunjanue Ellis (“King Richard”)

Best Adapted Screenplay

“CODA,” screenplay by Siân Heder

“Drive My Car,” screenplay by Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Takamasa Oe

“Dune,” screenplay by Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve and Eric Roth

“The Lost Daughter,” written by Maggie Gyllenhaal

“The Power of the Dog,” written by Jane Campion

Best Original Screenplay

“Belfast,” written by Kenneth Branagh

“Don’t Look Up,” screenplay by Adam McKay; story by Adam McKay and David Sirota

“King Richard,” written by Zach Baylin

“Licorice Pizza,” written by Paul Thomas Anderson

“The Worst Person in the World,” written by Eskil Vogt, Joachim Trier

Best Cinematography

“Dune,” Greig Fraser

“Nightmare Alley,” Dan Laustsen

“The Power of the Dog,” Ari Wegner

“The Tragedy of Macbeth,” Bruno Delbonnel

“West Side Story,” Janusz Kaminski

Best Film Editing

“Don’t Look Up,” Hank Corwin

“Dune,” Joe Walker

“King Richard”, Pamela Martin

“The Power of the Dog,” Peter Sciberras

“Tick, Tick…Boom!” Myron Kerstein and Andrew Weisblum

Best Sound

“Belfast,” Denise Yarde, Simon Chase, James Mather and Niv Adiri

“Dune,” Mac Ruth, Mark Mangini, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett

“No Time to Die,” Simon Hayes, Oliver Tarney, James Harrison, Paul Massey and Mark Taylor

“The Power of the Dog,” Richard Flynn, Robert Mackenzie and Tara Webb

“West Side Story,” Tod A. Maitland, Gary Rydstrom, Brian Chumney, Andy Nelson and Shawn Murphy

Best Original Score

“Don’t Look Up,” Nicholas Britell

“Dune,” Hans Zimmer

“Encanto,” Germaine Franco

“Parallel Mothers,” Alberto Iglesias

“The Power of the Dog,” Jonny Greenwood

Best Original Song

“Be Alive” from “King Richard,” music and lyric by Dixson and Beyoncé Knowles-Carter

“Dos Oruguitas” from “Encanto,” music and lyric by Lin-Manuel Miranda

“Down to Joy” from “Belfast,” music and lyric by Van Morrison

“No Time To Die” from “No Time to Die,” music and lyric by Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell

“Somehow You Do” from “Four Good Days,” music and lyric by Diane Warren

Best Animated Feature Film

“Encanto,” Jared Bush, Byron Howard, Yvett Merino and Clark Spencer

“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie

“Luca,” Enrico Casarosa and Andrea Warren

“The Mitchells vs. the Machines,” Mike Rianda, Phil Lord, Christopher Miller and Kurt Albrecht

“Raya and the Last Dragon,” Don Hall, Carlos López Estrada, Osnat Shurer and Peter Del Vecho

Best International Feature Film

“Drive My Car” (Japan)

“Flee” (Denmark)

“The Hand of God” (Italy)

“Lunana: A Yak in the Classroom” (Bhutan)

“The Worst Person in the World” (Norway)

Best Documentary Feature

“Ascension,” Jessica Kingdon, Kira Simon-Kennedy and Nathan Truesdell

“Attica,” Stanley Nelson and Traci A. Curry

“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie

“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised),” Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, Joseph Patel, Robert Fyvolent and David Dinerstein

“Writing With Fire,” Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

“Coming 2 America,” Mike Marino, Stacey Morris and Carla Farmer

“Cruella,” Nadia Stacey, Naomi Donne and Julia Vernon

“Dune,” Donald Mowat, Love Larson and Eva von Bahr

“The Eyes of Tammy Faye,” Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram and Justin Raleigh

“House of Gucci,” Göran Lundström, Anna Carin Lock and Frederic Aspiras

Best Costume Design

“Cruella,” Jenny Beavan

“Cyrano,” Massimo Cantini Parrini and Jacqueline Durran

“Dune,” Jacqueline West and Robert Morgan

“Nightmare Alley,” Luis Sequeira

“West Side Story,” Paul Tazewell

Best Production Design

“Dune,” production design: Patrice Vermette; set decoration: Zsuzsanna Sipos

“Nightmare Alley,” production design: Tamara Deverell; set decoration: Shane Vieau

“The Power of the Dog,” production design: Grant Major; set decoration: Amber Richards

“The Tragedy of Macbeth,” production design: Stefan Dechant; set decoration: Nancy Haigh

“West Side Story,” production design: Adam Stockhausen; set decoration: Rena DeAngelo

Best Visual Effects

“Dune,” Paul Lambert, Tristan Myles, Brian Connor and Gerd Nefzer*

“Free Guy,” Swen Gillberg, Bryan Grill, Nikos Kalaitzidis and Dan Sudick

“No Time to Die,” Charlie Noble, Joel Green, Jonathan Fawkner and Chris Corbould

“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings,” Christopher Townsend, Joe Farrell, Sean Noel Walker and Dan Oliver

“Spider-Man: No Way Home,” Kelly Port, Chris Waegner, Scott Edelstein and Dan Sudick

Best Documentary Short Subject

“Audible,” Matt Ogens and Geoff McLean

“Lead Me Home,” Pedro Kos and Jon Shenk

“The Queen of Basketball,” Ben Proudfoot

“Three Songs for Benazir,” Elizabeth Mirzaei and Gulistan Mirzaei

“When We Were Bullies,” Jay Rosenblatt

Best Animated Short Film

“Affairs of the Art,” Joanna Quinn and Les Mills

“Bestia,” Hugo Covarrubias and Tevo Díaz

“Boxballet,” Anton Dyakov

“Robin Robin,” Dan Ojari and Mikey Please

“The Windshield Wiper,” Alberto Mielgo and Leo Sanchez

Best Live-Action Short Film

“Ala Kachuu – Take and Run,” Maria Brendle and Nadine Lüchinger

“The Dress,” Tadeusz Łysiak and Maciej Ślesicki

“The Long Goodbye,” Aneil Karia and Riz Ahmed

“On My Mind,” Martin Strange-Hansen and Kim Magnusson

“Please Hold,” K.D. Dávila and Levin Menekse

2022 Golden Globe Awards: ‘The Power of the Dog,’ ‘West Side Story,’ ‘Succession’ are the top winners

January 9, 2022

With three awards each, the Netflix drama “The Power of the Dog,” 20th Century Studios’ musical remake “West Side Story” and HBO’s drama series “Succession” won the most prizes at the 79th annual Golden Globe Awards. The private ceremonywhich took place in Los Angeles on January 9, 2022was not televised or webcast, and the news media were not invited to cover the event. Instead, winners were announced on the official Golden Globes Twitter account.

“The Power of the Dog” took the prizes for Best Motion Picture – Drama; Best Director (for Jane Campion); and Best Supporting Actor (for Kodi Smit-McPhee). The Golden Globe Awards for “West Side Story” were Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy; Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy (for Rachel Zegler); and Best Supporting Actress (for Ariana DeBose).

“Succession” won Golden Globes for Best Television Series – Drama; Best Actor in a Television Series – Drama (for Jeremy Strong); and Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television (for Sarah Snook).

“The Power of the Dog” and Focus Features’ drama “Belfast” led the nominations with seven nods each. “Belfast” ended up winning just one Golden Globe Award: Best Screenplay. In the TV categories, “Succession” was the top TV nominee, with five nods, including Best Drama Series.

The non-profit Hollywood Foreign Press Association votes for the Golden Globe nominations and awards. As previously reported, NBC dropped the Golden Globe Awards telecast in 2022, because of controversies over the HFPA’s lack of racial diversity and because of how the HFPA handles funds and gifting that its members receive for HPFA-related things. Up until August 2021, the HFPA did not have a black person as a member for 20 years.

The HFPA (which currently has about 100 members) has also come under fire for questionable spending and for its members accepting lavish gifts from studios that wanted to get HFPA members to vote for whatever the studios were pitching. The HFPA has since changed its leadership, modified its gifting/funding policies, and added more people of color to its membership, including a few black people. However, it remains to be seen if the HFPA and the Golden Globe Awards can fully recover from their very tarnished reputation.

Here is the complete list of winners and nominees for the 2022 Golden Globe Awards:

*=winner

MOVIES

Best Motion Picture – Drama
“Belfast” (Focus Features)
“CODA” (Apple TV+)
“Dune” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
“King Richard” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
“The Power of the Dog” (Netflix)*

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
“Cyrano” (MGM)
“Don’t Look Up” (Netflix)
“Licorice Pizza” (MGM/United Artists Releasing)
“Tick, Tick … Boom!” (Netflix)
“West Side Story” (20th Century Studios)*

Best Director 
Kenneth Branagh (“Belfast”)
Jane Campion (“The Power of the Dog”)*
Maggie Gyllenhaal (“The Lost Daughter”)
Steven Spielberg (“West Side Story”)
Denis Villeneuve (“Dune”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Mahershala Ali (“Swan Song”)
Javier Bardem (“Being the Ricardos”)
Benedict Cumberbatch (“The Power of the Dog”)
Will Smith (“King Richard”)*
Denzel Washington (“The Tragedy of Macbeth”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Leonardo DiCaprio (“Don’t Look Up”)
Peter Dinklage (“Cyrano”)
Andrew Garfield (“Tick, Tick … Boom!”)*
Cooper Hoffman (“Licorice Pizza”)
Anthony Ramos (“In the Heights”)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Jessica Chastain (“The Eyes of Tammy Faye”)
Olivia Colman (“The Lost Daughter”)
Nicole Kidman (“Being the Ricardos”)*
Lady Gaga (“House of Gucci”)
Kristen Stewart (“Spencer”)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Marion Cotillard (“Annette”)
Alana Haim (“Licorice Pizza”)
Jennifer Lawrence (“Don’t Look Up”)
Emma Stone (“Cruella”)
Rachel Zegler (“West Side Story”)*

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture
Ben Affleck (“The Tender Bar”)
Jamie Dornan (“Belfast”)
Ciarán Hinds (“Belfast”)
Troy Kotsur (“CODA”)
Kodi Smit-McPhee (“The Power of the Dog”)*

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture 
Caitríona Balfe (“Belfast”)
Ariana DeBose (“West Side Story”)*
Kirsten Dunst (“The Power of the Dog”)
Aunjanue Ellis (“King Richard”)
Ruth Negga (“Passing”)

Best Screenplay
Paul Thomas Anderson, “Licorice Pizza”
Kenneth Branagh, “Belfast”*
Jane Campion, “The Power of the Dog”
Adam McKay, “Don’t Look Up”
Aaron Sorkin, “Being the Ricardos”

Best Original Score
Alexandre Desplat, “The French Dispatch”
Germaine Franco, “Encanto”
Jonny Greenwood, “The Power of the Dog”
Alberto Iglesias, “Parallel Mothers”
Hans Zimmer, “Dune”*

Best Original Song 
“Be Alive” from “King Richard,” written by Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, Dixson
“Dos Orugitas” from “Encanto,” written by Lin-Manuel Miranda
“No Time to Die” from “No Time to Die,” written by Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell*
“Down to Joy” from “Belfast,” written by Van Morrison
“Here I Am (Singing My Way Home)” from “Respect,” written by Jamie Alexander Hartman, Jennifer Hudson and Carole King

Best Animated Film 
“Encanto” (Walt Disney Pictures)*
“Flee” (Neon)
“Luca” (Pixar)
“My Sunny Maad” (Aerofilms)
“Raya and the Last Dragon” (Walt Disney Pictures)

Best Foreign Language Film
“Compartment No. 6” (Sony Pictures Classics)
“Drive My Car” (Janus Films)*
“The Hand of God” (Netflix)
“A Hero” (Amazon Studios)
“Parallel Mothers” (Sony Pictures Classics)

TELEVISION

Best Television Series – Drama
“Lupin” (Netflix)
“The Morning Show” (Apple TV+)
“Pose” (FX)
“Squid Game” (Netflix)
“Succession” (HBO)*

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
“The Great” (Hulu)
“Hacks” (HBO Max)*
“Only Murders in the Building” (Hulu)
“Reservation Dogs” (FX on Hulu)
“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)

Best Actor in a Television Series – Drama
Brian Cox, “Succession”
Lee Jung-jae, “Squid Game”
Billy Porter, “Pose”
Jeremy Strong, “Succession”*
Omar Sy, “Lupin”

Best Actress in a Television Series – Drama
Uzo Aduba, “In Treatment”
Jennifer Aniston, “The Morning Show”
Christine Baranski, “The Good Fight”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Mj Rodriguez, “Pose”*

Best Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Anthony Anderson, “Black-ish”
Nicholas Hoult, “The Great”
Steve Martin, “Only Murders in the Building”
Martin Short, “Only Murders in the Building”
Jason Sudeikis, “Ted Lasso”*

Best Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Hannah Einbinder, “Hacks”
Elle Fanning, “The Great”
Issa Rae, “Insecure”
Tracee Ellis Ross, “Black-ish”
Jean Smart, “Hacks”*

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
“Dopesick” (Hulu)
“Impeachment: American Crime Story” (FX)
“Maid” (Netflix)
“Mare of Easttown” (HBO)
“The Underground Railroad” (Amazon Prime Video)*

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Paul Bettany, “WandaVision”
Oscar Isaac, “Scenes From a Marriage”
Michael Keaton, “Dopesick”*
Ewan McGregor, “Halston”
Tahar Rahim, “The Serpent”

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Jessica Chastain, “Scenes From a Marriage”
Cynthia Erivo, “Genius: Aretha” 
Elizabeth Olsen, “WandaVision”
Margaret Qualley, “Maid”
Kate Winslet, “Mare of Easttown”*

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Kieran Culkin, “Succession”
Billy Crudup, “The Morning Show”
Mark Duplass, “The Morning Show”
Brett Goldstein, “Ted Lasso”
Oh Yeong-su, “Squid Game”*

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Jennifer Coolidge, “White Lotus”
Kaitlyn Dever, “Dopesick”
Andie MacDowell, “Maid”
Sarah Snook, “Succession”*
Hannah Waddingham, “Ted Lasso”

2022 Critics Choice Awards: ‘Belfast,’ ‘West Side Story’ are the top nominees

December 13, 2021

The following is a combination of press releases from the Critics Choice Association:

The Critics Choice Association (CCA) announced today the film category nominees for the 27th Annual Critics Choice Awards. The winners will be revealed at the star-studded Critics Choice Awards gala hosted by Taye Diggs and Nicole Byer, which will broadcast LIVE on The CW and TBS on Sunday, January 9, 2022 from 7:00 – 10:00 pm ET (delayed PT – check local listings).*

*[December 22, 2021 UPDATE: The ceremony has been postponed until further notice, due to concerns over increasing COVID-19 infections, particiularly from the Omicron variant. The Critics Choice Association issued this statement: “After thoughtful consideration and candid conversations with our partners at The CW and TBS, we have collectively come to the conclusion that the prudent and responsible decision at this point is to postpone the 27th Annual Critics Choice Awards, originally slated for January 9, 2022. We are in constant communication with LA County Health Officials, and we are currently working diligently to find a new date during the upcoming awards season in which to host our annual gala in-person with everyone’s safety and health remaining our top priority. We will be sharing additional details with our friends and colleagues throughout the entertainment industry as soon as we can.”]

*[January 13, 2022 UPDATE: The ceremony has been rescheduled for March 13, 2022.]

*[February 16, 2022 UPDATE: The ceremony will be held in Los Angeles and in London, to accommodate people who will attending the BAFTA Film Awards happening on the same night.]

“Belfast” from Focus Features and “West Side Story” from 20th Century Studios lead this year’s film contenders, earning 11 nominations each. In addition to Best Picture, “Belfast” racked up several acting nominations including Best Supporting Actor nods for both Jamie Dornan and Ciarán Hinds, Best Supporting Actress for Caitríona Balfe, Best Young Actor/Actress for Jude Hill, and Best Acting Ensemble, while Kenneth Branagh could take home both the Best Director and Best Original Screenplay trophies. “Belfast” also earned nominations for Haris Zambarloukos for Best Cinematography, Jim Clay and Claire Nia Richards for Best Production Design, and Úna Ní Dhonghaíle for Best Editing.

Steven Spielberg received a Best Director nomination for his Best Picture contender “West Side Story.” Two of the film’s standout performers, Ariana DeBose and Rita Moreno, will be vying for Best Supporting Actress, while Rachel Zegler is up for Best Young Actor/Actress. “West Side Story” also garnered a nomination for Best Acting Ensemble, and nods for Tony Kushner for Best Adapted Screenplay, Janusz Kaminski for Best Cinematography, Adam Stockhausen and Rena DeAngelo for Best Production Design, Sarah Broshar and Michael Kahn for Best Editing, and Paul Tazewell for Best Costume Design.

The list of Best Picture hopefuls featured several more films with impressive nomination counts, including “Dune” and “The Power of the Dog” which picked up ten each. “Licorice Pizza” and “Nightmare Alley” collected eight nominations apiece, followed by “King Richard” and “Don’t Look Up,” each with six. Rounding out the Best Picture nominees are “CODA” and “tick, tick…Boom!”

“We are so proud to be honoring this amazing list of films and the incredibly talented people who made them during this extremely challenging time,” said Critics Choice Association CEO Joey Berlin. “All eyes are going to be on the Fairmont Century Plaza red carpet and ballroom on January 9th, when the biggest stars in movies and television will be gathered to celebrate the best of the best in entertainment this past year. In the safest possible environment, it will mark the return of the kind of glitz and glamor we haven’t been able to enjoy in far too long.”

Kieran Culkin, Jeremy Strong, Sarah Snook and Brian Cox in “Succession” (Photo by Graeme Hunter/HBO)

HBO’s “Succession” leads this year’s TV contenders with eight nominations. In addition to Best Drama Series the show racked up a slew of acting nominations including nods for both Brian Cox and Jeremy Strong for Best Actor in a Drama Series. Several of their co-stars also find themselves vying with each other, as Nicholas Braun, Kieran Culkin and Matthew Macfadyen all scored nominations for Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series, while J. Smith-Cameron and Sarah Snook are both up for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series.

“Mare of Easttown” (HBO) and “Evil” (Paramount+) impressed with five nominations each. “Mare of Easttown” is up for Best Limited Series, with Kate Winslet nominated for Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television, Evan Peters for Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television, and both Julianne Nicholson and Jean Smart nominated for Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television. “Evil” is nominated for Best Drama Series, Mike Colter for Best Actor in a Drama Series, Katja Herbers for Best Actress in a Drama Series, and both Andrea Martin and Christine Lahti are up for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series.

Several programs earned four nominations each, “Only Murders in the Building” (Hulu), “Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+), “The Good Fight” (Paramount+), “This Is Us” (NBC), and “WandaVision” (Disney+).

“Although the industry is still recovering from the COVID-19 lockdown, you wouldn’t know it from the wealth of amazing television programs our nomination committees pored through to come up with this year’s nominees,” said Critics Choice Association TV Branch president Ed Martin. “We have even more choices than we did before the pandemic, for critics and viewers to embrace. While the streamers continue to break new ground with some wonderfully unexpected offerings, it has been an unusually strong year for all areas of television.  We look forward to honoring the year’s finest shows at what promises to be our most exciting awards ceremony yet.”  

The Critics Choice Awards are bestowed annually to honor the finest in cinematic and television achievement. Historically, they are the most accurate predictor of Academy Award nominations. 

The 27th annual Critics Choice Awards show will be produced by Bob Bain Productions and Berlin Entertainment. The CCA is represented by Dan Black of Greenberg Traurig.  

Follow the 27th annual Critics Choice Awards on Twitter and Instagram @CriticsChoice and on Facebook/CriticsChoiceAwards.

About the Critics Choice Association (CCA) 

The Critics Choice Association is the largest critics organization in the United States and Canada, representing more than 500 media critics and entertainment journalists. It was established in 2019 with the formal merger of the Broadcast Film Critics Association and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association, recognizing the intersection between film, television, and streaming content. For more information, visit: www.CriticsChoice.com.

About The CW:

THE CW TELEVISION NETWORK launched in 2006 as America’s fifth broadcast network, with programming targeting younger viewers, a demographic highly sought after by advertisers. The CW, a joint venture between Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corporation, now broadcasts across the week, offering fourteen-hours of primetime programming, Monday through Sunday, beginning in Fall 2021. The CW’s primetime programming is also available to stream for free, without authentication, on the ad-supported CWTV.com and The CW app, now available on every major OTT platform. Additionally, The CW broadcasts a three-hour Saturday morning kids block. The CW’s digital network CW Seed launched in 2013 and offers original short-form digital content as well as past seasons of fan-favorite television series. For more information about the network and its programming, visit www.cwtvpr.com.

About TBS:

TBS, a WarnerMedia brand, is a top-rated destination for television among young adults and known for escapist, good-time entertainment, featuring smart, imaginative stories with heart and comedic edge. From scripted comedy series to late-night shows, game shows, and animated programming, TBS’ Originals slate is comprised of some of the most popular shows on cable — “Miracle Workers,” ”Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,” ”The Last O.G.,” ”American Dad!” and ”Chad.” The network’s slate of premium unscripted series includes “The Misery Index,” “Go-Big Show,” “Wipeout,” “Friday Night Vibes” and “The Cube” along with upcoming series, “The Big D”. TBS’ lineup also includes comedy hits like “Young Sheldon” and ”The Big Bang Theory,” classic sitcom favorites such as “Friends,” blockbuster movies, and live event coverage of Major League Baseball, the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship and “ELEAGUE,” WarnerMedia’s eSports gaming competition. Website: www.tbs.com

FILM NOMINATIONS FOR THE 27TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

BEST PICTURE

  • Belfast
  • CODA
  • Don’t Look Up
  • Dune
  • King Richard
  • Licorice Pizza
  • Nightmare Alley
  • The Power of the Dog
  • tick, tick…Boom!
  • West Side Story

BEST ACTOR

  • Nicolas Cage – Pig
  • Benedict Cumberbatch – The Power of the Dog
  • Peter Dinklage – Cyrano
  • Andrew Garfield – tick, tick…Boom!
  • Will Smith – King Richard
  • Denzel Washington – The Tragedy of Macbeth

BEST ACTRESS

  • Jessica Chastain – The Eyes of Tammy Faye
  • Olivia Colman – The Lost Daughter
  • Lady Gaga – House of Gucci
  • Alana Haim – Licorice Pizza
  • Nicole Kidman – Being the Ricardos
  • Kristen Stewart – Spencer

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

  • Jamie Dornan – Belfast
  • Ciarán Hinds – Belfast
  • Troy Kotsur – CODA
  • Jared Leto – House of Gucci
  • J.K. Simmons – Being the Ricardos
  • Kodi Smit-McPhee – The Power of the Dog

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

  • Caitríona Balfe – Belfast
  • Ariana DeBose – West Side Story
  • Ann Dowd – Mass
  • Kirsten Dunst – The Power of the Dog
  • Aunjanue Ellis – King Richard
  • Rita Moreno – West Side Story

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS

  • Jude Hill – Belfast
  • Cooper Hoffman – Licorice Pizza
  • Emilia Jones – CODA
  • Woody Norman – C’mon C’mon
  • Saniyya Sidney – King Richard
  • Rachel Zegler – West Side Story

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE

  • Belfast
  • Don’t Look Up
  • The Harder They Fall
  • Licorice Pizza
  • The Power of the Dog
  • West Side Story

BEST DIRECTOR

  • Paul Thomas Anderson – Licorice Pizza
  • Kenneth Branagh – Belfast
  • Jane Campion – The Power of the Dog
  • Guillermo del Toro – Nightmare Alley
  • Steven Spielberg – West Side Story
  • Denis Villeneuve – Dune

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

  • Paul Thomas Anderson – Licorice Pizza
  • Zach Baylin – King Richard
  • Kenneth Branagh – Belfast
  • Adam McKay, David Sirota – Don’t Look Up
  • Aaron Sorkin – Being the Ricardos

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

  • Jane Campion – The Power of the Dog
  • Maggie Gyllenhaal – The Lost Daughter
  • Siân Heder – CODA
  • Tony Kushner – West Side Story
  • Jon Spaihts, Denis Villeneuve, Eric Roth – Dune

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • Bruno Delbonnel – The Tragedy of Macbeth
  • Greig Fraser – Dune
  • Janusz Kaminski – West Side Story
  • Dan Laustsen – Nightmare Alley
  • Ari Wegner – The Power of the Dog
  • Haris Zambarloukos – Belfast

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN

  • Jim Clay, Claire Nia Richards – Belfast
  • Tamara Deverell, Shane Vieau – Nightmare Alley
  • Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo – The French Dispatch
  • Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo – West Side Story
  • Patrice Vermette, Zsuzsanna Sipos – Dune

BEST EDITING

  • Sarah Broshar and Michael Kahn – West Side Story
  • Úna Ní Dhonghaíle – Belfast
  • Andy Jurgensen – Licorice Pizza
  • Peter Sciberras – The Power of the Dog
  • Joe Walker – Dune

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

  • Jenny Beavan – Cruella
  • Luis Sequeira – Nightmare Alley
  • Paul Tazewell – West Side Story
  • Jacqueline West, Robert Morgan – Dune
  • Janty Yates – House of Gucci

BEST HAIR AND MAKEUP

  • Cruella
  • Dune
  • The Eyes of Tammy Faye
  • House of Gucci
  • Nightmare Alley

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

  • Dune
  • The Matrix Resurrections
  • Nightmare Alley
  • No Time to Die
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

BEST COMEDY

  • Barb & Star Go to Vista Del Mar
  • Don’t Look Up
  • Free Guy
  • The French Dispatch
  • Licorice Pizza

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

  • Encanto
  • Flee
  • Luca
  • The Mitchells vs the Machines
  • Raya and the Last Dragon

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

  • A Hero
  • Drive My Car
  • Flee
  • The Hand of God
  • The Worst Person in the World

BEST SONG

  • Be Alive – King Richard
  • Dos Oruguitas – Encanto
  • Guns Go Bang – The Harder They Fall
  • Just Look Up – Don’t Look Up
  • No Time to Die – No Time to Die

BEST SCORE

  • Nicholas Britell – Don’t Look Up
  • Jonny Greenwood – The Power of the Dog
  • Jonny Greenwood – Spencer
  • Nathan Johnson – Nightmare Alley
  • Hans Zimmer – Dune

NOMINATIONS BY FILM FOR THE 27TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

A HERO – 1 

Best Foreign Language Film

Barb & Star Go to Vista Del Mar – 1 

Best Comedy

Being the Ricardos – 3

Best Actress – Nicole Kidman

Best Supporting Actor – J.K. Simmons

Best Original Screenplay – Aaron Sorkin

Belfast – 11

Best Picture

Best Supporting Actor – Jamie Dornan

Best Supporting Actor – Ciarán Hinds

Best Supporting Actress – Caitríona Balfe

Best Young Actor/Actress – Jude Hill

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – Kenneth Branagh

Best Original Screenplay – Kenneth Branagh

Best Cinematography – Haris Zambarloukos

Best Production Design – Jim Clay, Claire Nia Richards

Best Editing – Úna Ní Dhonghaíle

C’mon C’mon – 1

Best Young Actor/Actress – Woody Norman

CODA – 4

Best Picture

Best Supporting Actor – Troy Kotsur

Best Young Actor/Actress – Emilia Jones

Best Adapted Screenplay – Siân Heder

Cruella – 2

Best Costume Design – Jenny Beavan

Best Hair And Makeup

Cyrano – 1

Best Actor – Peter Dinklage

Don’t Look Up – 6

Best Picture

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Original Screenplay – Adam McKay, David Sirota

Best Comedy

Best Song – Just Look Up

Best Score – Nicholas Britell

Drive My Car – 1

Best Foreign Language Film

Dune – 10

Best Picture 

Best Director – Denis Villeneuve

Best Adapted Screenplay – Jon Spaihts, Denis Villeneuve, Eric Roth

Best Cinematography – Greig Fraser

Best Production Design – Patrice Vermette, Zsuzsanna Sipos

Best Editing – Joe Walker

Best Costume Design – Jacqueline West, Robert Morgan

Best Hair And Makeup

Best Visual Effects

Best Score – Hans Zimmer

Encanto – 2

Best Animated Feature

Best Song – Dos Oruguitas

Flee – 2

Best Animated Feature

Best Foreign Language Film

Free Guy – 1

Best Comedy

House of Gucci – 4

Best Actress – Lady Gaga

Best Supporting Actor – Jared Leto

Best Costume Design – Janty Yates

Best Hair And Makeup

King Richard – 6

Best Picture

Best Actor – Will Smith

Best Supporting Actress – Aunjanue Ellis

Best Young Actor/Actress – Saniyya Sidney

Best Original Screenplay – Zach Baylin

Best Song – Be Alive

Licorice Pizza – 8

Best Picture

Best Actress – Alana Haim

Best Young Actor/Actress – Cooper Hoffman

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – Paul Thomas Anderson

Best Original Screenplay – Paul Thomas Anderson

Best Editing – Andy Jurgensen

Best Comedy

Luca – 1

Best Animated Feature

Mass – 1

Best Supporting Actress – Ann Dowd

Nightmare Alley – 8

Best Picture

Best Director – Guillermo del Toro

Best Cinematography – Dan Laustsen

Best Production Design – Tamara Deverell, Shane Vieau

Best Costume Design – Luis Sequeira

Best Hair And Makeup

Best Visual Effects

Best Score – Nathan Johnson

No Time to Die – 2

Best Visual Effects

Best Song – No Time to Die

Pig – 1

Best Actor – Nicolas Cage 

Raya and the Last Dragon – 1

Best Animated Feature

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings – 1

Best Visual Effects

Spencer – 2

Best Actress – Kristen Stewart

Best Score – Jonny Greenwood

The Eyes of Tammy Faye – 2

Best Actress – Jessica Chastain

Best Hair And Makeup

The French Dispatch – 2

Best Production Design – Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo

Best Comedy

The Hand of God – 1

Best Foreign Language Film

The Harder They Fall – 2

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Song – Guns Go Bang

The Lost Daughter – 2

Best Actress – Olivia Colman

Best Adapted Screenplay – Maggie Gyllenhaal

The Matrix Resurrections – 1

Best Visual Effects

The Mitchells vs the Machines – 1

Best Animated Feature

The Power of the Dog – 10

Best Picture

Best Actor – Benedict Cumberbatch

Best Supporting Actor – Kodi Smit-McPhee

Best Supporting Actress – Kirsten Dunst

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – Jane Campion

Best Adapted Screenplay – Jane Campion

Best Cinematography – Ari Wegner

Best Editing – Peter Sciberras

Best Score – Jonny Greenwood

The Tragedy of Macbeth – 2

Best Actor – Denzel Washington

Best Cinematography – Bruno Delbonnel

The Worst Person in the World – 1

Best Foreign Language Film

tick, tick…Boom! – 2

Best Picture

Best Actor – Andrew Garfield

West Side Story – 11

Best Picture

Best Supporting Actress – Ariana DeBose

Best Supporting Actress – Rita Moreno

Best Young Actor/Actress – Rachel Zegler

Best Acting Ensemble

Best Director – Steven Spielberg

Best Adapted Screenplay – Tony Kushner

Best Cinematography – Janusz Kaminski

Best Production Design – Adam Stockhausen, Rena DeAngelo

Best Editing – Sarah Broshar and Michael Kahn

Best Costume Design – Paul Tazewell

TELEVISION NOMINATIONS FOR THE 27TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

BEST DRAMA SERIES

  • Evil (Paramount+)
  • For All Mankind (Apple TV+)
  • The Good Fight (Paramount+)
  • Pose (FX)
  • Squid Game (Netflix)
  • Succession (HBO)
  • This Is Us (NBC)
  • Yellowjackets (Showtime)

BEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

  • Sterling K. Brown – This Is Us (NBC)
  • Mike Colter – Evil (Paramount+)
  • Brian Cox – Succession (HBO)
  • Lee Jung-jae – Squid Game (Netflix)
  • Billy Porter – Pose (FX)
  • Jeremy Strong – Succession (HBO)

BEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

  • Uzo Aduba – In Treatment (HBO)
  • Chiara Aurelia – Cruel Summer (Freeform)
  • Christine Baranski – The Good Fight (Paramount+)
  • Katja Herbers – Evil (Paramount+)
  • Melanie Lynskey – Yellowjackets (Showtime)
  • MJ Rodriguez – Pose (FX)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

  • Nicholas Braun – Succession (HBO)
  • Billy Crudup – The Morning Show (Apple TV+)
  • Kieran Culkin – Succession (HBO)
  • Justin Hartley – This Is Us (NBC)
  • Matthew Macfadyen – Succession (HBO)
  • Mandy Patinkin – The Good Fight (Paramount+)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

  • Andrea Martin – Evil (Paramount+)
  • Audra McDonald – The Good Fight (Paramount+)
  • Christine Lahti – Evil (Paramount+)
  • J. Smith-Cameron – Succession (HBO)
  • Sarah Snook – Succession (HBO)
  • Susan Kelechi Watson – This Is Us (NBC)

BEST COMEDY SERIES

  • The Great (Hulu)
  • Hacks (HBO Max)
  • Insecure (HBO)
  • Only Murders in the Building (Hulu)
  • The Other Two (HBO Max)
  • Reservation Dogs (FX on Hulu)
  • Ted Lasso (Apple TV+)
  • What We Do in the Shadows (FX)

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

  • Iain Armitage – Young Sheldon (CBS)
  • Nicholas Hoult – The Great (Hulu)
  • Steve Martin – Only Murders in the Building (Hulu)
  • Kayvan Novak – What We Do in the Shadows (FX)
  • Martin Short – Only Murders in the Building (Hulu)
  • Jason Sudeikis – Ted Lasso (Apple TV+)

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

  • Elle Fanning – The Great (Hulu)
  • Renée Elise Goldsberry – Girls5eva (Peacock)
  • Selena Gomez – Only Murders in the Building (Hulu) 
  • Sandra Oh – The Chair (Netflix)
  • Issa Rae – Insecure (HBO)
  • Jean Smart – Hacks (HBO Max)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

  • Ncuti Gatwa – Sex Education (Netflix)
  • Brett Goldstein – Ted Lasso (Apple TV+)
  • Harvey Guillén – What We Do in the Shadows (FX)
  • Brandon Scott Jones – Ghosts (CBS)
  • Ray Romano – Made for Love (HBO Max)
  • Bowen Yang – Saturday Night Live (NBC)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

  • Hannah Einbinder – Hacks (HBO Max)
  • Kristin Chenoweth – Schmigadoon! (Apple TV+)
  • Molly Shannon – The Other Two (HBO Max) 
  • Cecily Strong – Saturday Night Live (NBC)
  • Josie Totah – Saved By the Bell (Peacock)
  • Hannah Waddingham – Ted Lasso (Apple TV+)

BEST LIMITED SERIES

  • Dopesick (Hulu)
  • Dr. Death (Peacock)
  • It’s a Sin (HBO Max)
  • Maid (Netflix)
  • Mare of Easttown (HBO)
  • Midnight Mass (Netflix)
  • The Underground Railroad (Amazon Prime Video)
  • WandaVision (Disney+)

BEST MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Come From Away (Apple TV+)
  • List of a Lifetime (Lifetime)
  • The Map of Tiny Perfect Things (Amazon Prime Video)
  • Robin Roberts Presents: Mahalia (Lifetime)
  • Oslo (HBO)
  • Zoey’s Extraordinary Christmas (The Roku Channel)

BEST ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Olly Alexander – It’s a Sin (HBO Max)
  • Paul Bettany – WandaVision (Disney+)
  • William Jackson Harper – Love Life (HBO Max)
  • Joshua Jackson – Dr. Death (Peacock)
  • Michael Keaton – Dopesick (Hulu)
  • Hamish Linklater – Midnight Mass (Netflix)

BEST ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Danielle Brooks – Robin Roberts Presents: Mahalia (Lifetime)
  • Cynthia Erivo – Genius: Aretha (National Geographic)
  • Thuso Mbedu – The Underground Railroad (Amazon Prime Video)
  • Elizabeth Olsen – WandaVision (Disney+)
  • Margaret Qualley – Maid (Netflix)
  • Kate Winslet – Mare of Easttown (HBO)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Murray Bartlett – The White Lotus (HBO)
  • Zach Gilford – Midnight Mass (Netflix)
  • William Jackson Harper – The Underground Railroad (Amazon Prime Video)
  • Evan Peters – Mare of Easttown (HBO)
  • Christian Slater – Dr. Death (Peacock)
  • Courtney B. Vance – Genius: Aretha (National Geographic)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Jennifer Coolidge – The White Lotus (HBO)
  • Kaitlyn Dever – Dopesick (Hulu)
  • Kathryn Hahn – WandaVision (Disney+)
  • Melissa McCarthy – Nine Perfect Strangers (Hulu)
  • Julianne Nicholson – Mare of Easttown (HBO)
  • Jean Smart – Mare of Easttown (HBO)

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE SERIES

  • Acapulco (Apple TV+)
  • Call My Agent! (Netflix)
  • Lupin (Netflix)
  • Money Heist (Netflix)
  • Narcos: Mexico (Netflix)
  • Squid Game (Netflix)

BEST ANIMATED SERIES

  • Big Mouth (Netflix)
  • Bluey (Disney Junior)
  • Bob’s Burgers (Fox)
  • The Great North (Fox)
  • Q-Force (Netflix)
  • What If…? (Disney+)

BEST TALK SHOW

  • The Amber Ruffin Show (Peacock)
  • Desus & Mero (Showtime)
  • The Kelly Clarkson Show (NBC)
  • Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
  • Late Night with Seth Meyers (NBC)
  • Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen (Bravo)

BEST COMEDY SPECIAL 

  • Bo Burnham: Inside (Netflix)
  • Good Timing with Jo Firestone (Peacock)
  • James Acaster: Cold Lasagne Hate Myself 1999 (Vimeo)
  • Joyelle Nicole Johnson: Love Joy (Peacock)
  • Nate Bargatze: The Greatest Average American (Netflix)
  • Trixie Mattel: One Night Only (YouTube)

NOMINATIONS BY PROGRAM FOR THE 27TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

Acapulco (Apple TV+) – 1 

Best Foreign Language Series

Big Mouth (Netflix) – 1 

Best Animated Series

Bluey (Disney Junior) – 1

Best Animated Series

Bo Burnham: Inside (Netflix) – 1

Best Comedy Special

Bob’s Burgers (Fox) – 1

Best Animated Series

Call My Agent! (Netflix) – 1

Best Foreign Language Series

Come From Away (Apple TV+) – 1

Best Movie Made for Television

Cruel Summer (Freeform) – 1

Best Actress in a Drama Series – Chiara Aurelia

Desus & Mero (Showtime) – 1

Best Talk Show

Dopesick (Hulu) – 3

Best Limited Series

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Michael Keaton

Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Kaitlyn Dever

Dr. Death (Peacock) – 3

Best Limited Series

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Joshua Jackson

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Christian Slater

Evil (Paramount+) – 5

Best Drama Series

Best Actor in a Drama Series – Mike Colter 

Best Actress in a Drama Series – Katja Herbers

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Andrea Martin

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Christine Lahti

For All Mankind (Apple TV+) – 1

Best Drama Series

Genius: Aretha (National Geographic) – 2 

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Cynthia Erivo

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Courtney B. Vance

Ghosts (CBS) – 1

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Brandon Scott Jones

Girls5eva (Peacock) – 1

Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Renée Elise Goldsberry

Good Timing with Jo Firestone (Peacock) – 1

Best Comedy Special

Hacks (HBO Max) – 3

Best Comedy Series

Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Jean Smart

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Hannah Einbinder

In Treatment (HBO) – 1

Best Actress in a Drama Series – Uzo Aduba

Insecure (HBO) – 2

Best Comedy Series

Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Issa Rae

It’s A Sin (HBO Max) – 2

Best Limited Series

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Olly Alexander

James Acaster: Cold Lasagne Hate Myself 1999 (Vimeo) – 1 

Best Comedy Special

Joyelle Nicole Johnson: Love Joy (Peacock) – 1

Best Comedy Special

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) – 1

Best Talk Show

Late Night with Seth Meyers (NBC) – 1

Best Talk Show

List of a Lifetime (Lifetime) – 1

Best Movie Made for Television

Love Life (HBO Max) – 1

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – William Jackson Harper

Lupin (Netflix) – 1

Best Foreign Language Series

Made for Love (HBO Max) – 1

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Ray Romano

Maid (Netflix) – 2

Best Limited Series

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Margaret Qualley

Mare of Easttown (HBO) – 5

Best Limited Series

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Kate Winslet

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Evan Peters

Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Julianne Nicholson

Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Jean Smart

Midnight Mass (Netflix) – 3

Best Limited Series

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Hamish Linklater

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Zach Gilford

Money Heist (Netflix) – 1

Best Foreign Language Series

Narcos: Mexico (Netflix) – 1 

Best Foreign Language Series

Nate Bargatze: The Greatest Average American (Netflix) – 1

Best Comedy Special

Nine Perfect Strangers (Hulu) – 1

Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Melissa McCarthy

Only Murders in the Building (Hulu) – 4

Best Comedy Series

Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Steve Martin

Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Martin Short

Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Selena Gomez

Oslo (HBO) – 1

Best Movie Made for Television

Pose (FX) – 3

Best Drama Series

Best Actor in a Drama Series – Billy Porter

Best Actress in a Drama Series – MJ Rodriguez

Q-Force (Netflix) – 1

Best Animated Series

Reservation Dogs (FX on Hulu) – 1

Best Comedy Series

Robin Roberts Presents: Mahalia (Lifetime) – 2

Best Movie Made for Television

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Danielle Brooks

Saturday Night Live (NBC) – 2

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Bowen Yang

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Cecily Strong

Saved By the Bell (Peacock) – 1

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Josie Totah

Schmigadoon! (Apple TV+) – 1

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Kristin Chenoweth

Sex Education (Netflix) – 1

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Ncuti Gatwa

Squid Game (Netflix) – 3

Best Drama Series

Best Actor in a Drama Series – Lee Jung-jae

Best Foreign Language Series

Succession (HBO) – 8

Best Drama Series

Best Actor in a Drama Series – Brian Cox

Best Actor in a Drama Series – Jeremy Strong

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Nicholas Braun

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Kieran Culkin

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Matthew Macfadyen

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – J. Smith-Cameron

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Sarah Snook

Ted Lasso (Apple TV+) – 4

Best Comedy Series

Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Jason Sudeikis

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Brett Goldstein

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Hannah Waddingham

The Amber Ruffin Show (Peacock) – 1

Best Talk Show

The Chair (Netflix) – 1

Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Sandra Oh

The Good Fight (Paramont+) – 4

Best Drama Series

Best Actress in a Drama Series – Christine Baranski

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Mandy Patinkin

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Audra McDonald

The Great (Hulu) – 3

Best Comedy Series

Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Nicholas Hoult

Best Actress in a Comedy Series – Elle Fanning

The Great North (Fox) – 1

Best Animated Series

The Kelly Clarkson Show (NBC) – 1

Best Talk Show

The Map of Tiny Perfect Things (Amazon Prime Video) – 1

Best Movie Made for Television

The Morning Show (Apple TV+) – 1

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Billy Crudup

The Other Two (HBO Max) – 2

Best Comedy Series

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series – Molly Shannon

The Underground Railroad (Amazon Prime Video) – 3

Best Limited Series

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Thuso Mbedu

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – William Jackson Harper

The White Lotus (HBO) – 2

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Murray Bartlett

Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Jennifer Coolidge

This Is Us (NBC) – 4

Best Drama Series

Best Actor in a Drama Series – Sterling K. Brown

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series – Justin Hartley

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series – Susan Kelechi Watson

Trixie Mattel: One Night Only (YouTube) – 1

Best Comedy Special

WandaVision (Disney+) – 4

Best Limited Series

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Paul Bettany

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Elizabeth Olsen

Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television – Kathryn Hahn

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen (Bravo) – 1

Best Talk Show

What If…? (Disney+) – 1

Best Animated Series

What We Do in the Shadows (FX) – 3

Best Comedy Series

Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Kayvan Novak

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series – Harvey Guillén

Yellowjackets (Showtime) – 2

Best Drama Series

Best Actress in a Drama Series – Melanie Lynskey

Young Sheldon (CBS) – 1

Best Actor in a Comedy Series – Iain Armitage

Zoey’s Extraordinary Christmas (The Roku Channel) – 1

Best Movie Made for Television

TELEVISION NOMINATIONS BY COMPANY FOR THE 27TH ANNUAL CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS

HBO – 20

Netflix – 18

Hulu – 11

Apple TV+ – 9

HBO Max – 9

Paramount+ – 9

NBC – 8

Peacock – 8

FX – 7

Disney+ – 6

Amazon Prime Video – 4

Lifetime – 3

Showtime – 3

CBS – 2

Fox – 2

National Geographic – 2

Bravo – 1

Freeform – 1

The Roku Channel – 1

Vimeo – 1

YouTube – 1

Review: ‘West Side Story’ (2021), starring Ansel Elgort, Rachel Zegler, Ariana DeBose, David Alvarez, Mike Faist, Brian d’Arcy James and Rita Moreno

December 2, 2021

by Carla Hay

Ansel Elgort and Rachel Zegler in “West Side Story” (Photo courtesy of 20th Century Studios)

“West Side Story” (2021)

Directed by Steven Spielberg

Some language in Spanish with no subtitles

Culture Representation: Taking place in 1957 in New York City, the musical drama remake “West Side Story” features a cast of white and Latino people representing the working-class.

Culture Clash: A young Puerto Rican woman and a young Polish American man fall in love with each other, despite having people close to them who are in rival, warring gangs that are opposed to this romance.

Culture Audience: Besides the obvious target audience of fans of the original “West Side Story” movie musical, this 2021 version of “West Side Story” will appeal primarily to people who are fans of director Steven Spielberg and movie adaptations of Broadway musicals.

Ariana DeBose and David Alvarez in “West Side Story” (Photo courtesy of 20th Century Studios)

The 2021 remake of “West Side Story” is exactly the glossy spectacle that you might expect from director Steven Spielberg. The movie is a bonafide crowd-pleasing epic that makes some interesting changes from the 1961’s “West Side Story” movie, a classic that was directed by Jerome Robbins and Robert Wise. In the 2021 version of “West Side Story,” some of these changes work better than other revisions to the original movie. The original “West Side Story” movie was based on a Tony-winning musical that debuted on Broadway in 1957. The Broadway musical was written by Arthur Laurents, with music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Ernest Lehman wrote the screenplay to the 1961 “West Side Story,” while Tony Kushner wrote the screenplay to the 2021 “West Side Story.”

The original “West Side Story” movie starred Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Rita Moreno and George Chakiris as four young people in New York City who are caught in the middle of gang warfare, ethnic bigotry and risky romance. Moreno and Chakiris won Oscars for their supporting roles in the movie, which won a total of 10 Oscars, including Best Picture. (Moreno’s Oscar victory was groundbreaking, as she became the first Latina to win an Academy Award.) Is the 2021 version of “West Side Story” worthy of 10 Academy Awards? No, but there are some standout performances that should bring more attention to some very talented cast members. They do all their own singing, unlike some of the stars of the original “West Side Story” movie.

Most fans of musicals already know the basic premise of “West Side Story,” which is set in New York City (specifically, in a working-class area of Manhattan’s West Side) in 1957. It’s a story inspired by William Shakeapeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” In “West Side Story,” a sweet and innocent Puerto Rican woman named Maria, who’s in her late teens, falls in love with a slightly older, streetwise Polish American man named Tony, who is an ex-con trying to start a new and reformed life away from an all-white gang that he used to lead called the Jets. Maria’s domineering older brother Bernardo is the leader of an all-Puerto Rican rival gang called the Sharks. Bernardo is dating Maria’s sassy best friend Anita. Needless to say, the romance of Maria and Tony sparks a war between the Jets and the Sharks.

In the original “West Side Story” movie, Wood was Maria, Beymer was Tony, Moreno was Anita and Chakiris was Bernardo. In the 2021 “West Side Story” remake (which also takes place in 1957), Rachel Zegler is María, Ansel Elgort is Tony, Ariana DeBose is Anita and David Alvarez is Bernardo. Unlike the original “West Side Story” movie, Spielberg’s “West Side Story” remake avoids any criticism of “whitewashing” racial casting, by casting the people of color characters with actors who are also people of color. Zegler is a Latina of Colombian heritage. DeBose is multiracial; in interviews, she sometimes identifies herself as African American. (DeBose’s father is Afro-Latino, and her mother is white.)

Perhaps the biggest and best change to the “West Side Story” remake is the clever idea to cast original “West Side Story” movie co-star Moreno in the role of a new character: Valentina, the no-nonsense but kind-hearted owner of a drugstore called Doc’s Chemists, where Tony works. In this version of “West Side Story,” Valentina is the widow of Doc, the store’s owner in the original “West Side Story” movie. (Doc was played by Ned Glass.) Considering all the racial discord in the story, the Valentina character gives the movie added poignancy because a Latina woman has given Tony a chance to redeem himself and start a new life.

Valentina represents the bridge between the divides caused by racism and xenophobia in the community that’s depicted in the movie. And there’s an extra layer of female empowerment/solidarity in a pivotal scene in the movie, when Anita defends herself from being attacked in the store by members of the Jets, and Valentina intervenes to put a stop to the assault. This scene has a greater impact than in the original “West Side Story,” when the upstanding but somewhat wishy-washy Doc was the one who stopped the attack.

Rather than putting the scene in a stereotypical context of a man coming to the rescue of a woman, this “West Side Story” movie has a woman in charge (Valentina), who is the unflinching moral compass in a maelstrom of hate and chaos. The scene is also symbolic of all the racism and sexism that women of color have had to experience and what happens when women help each other in moments of distress and pain. Moreno has talked extensively in interviews about how this scene was the most emotionally difficult one for her to film in the original “West Side Story,” and she has said it was a surreal experience to film it again in the “West Side Story” remake—this time, as the rescuer instead of the one being attacked.

Spielberg’s “West Side Story” remake stays true to the main elements of the story. The movie opens with the Jets in a rubble-filled area that’s undergoing reconstruction to make way for higher-priced homes. The Jets, led by Tony’s best friend Riff (played by Mike Faist), are hoodlums who come from dysfunctional families and are hostile toward non-white immigrants whom they feel are taking over the city. Since 1917, Puerto Rico has been a U.S. territory, and people born in Puerto Rico are U.S. citizens. But that doesn’t stop people like the Jets (and many other xenophobic and racist people) from thinking that Puerto Ricans aren’t “real Americans.” If Tony had any past racism when he was in the Jets, it’s not directly mentioned in the movie. What’s clear is that Tony is now a reformed person and very much against racism.

Meanwhile, many of the Sharks, including Bernardo, dislike white people, whom they see as racist oppressors. Puerto Ricans such as Bernardo, María and Anita are U.S. citizens but feel like immigrants in the United States, where English is the dominant language and there’s open hatred and discrimination against people who aren’t white. Bernardo feels that the Sharks are superior to the Jets because, as he tells Riff in one of their many confrontations, at least most of the Sharks have jobs. The Jets—who are U.S.-born, mostly unemployed descendants of white European immigrants—are fueled by anger in their perception that the American Dream has been ripped away from them.

María, Bernardo, and Anita (who all pay rent and share the same apartment in this “West Side Story” remake) represent the American Dream of people whose first language is not English, which they’ve had to learn in order to get certain opportunities. María, Bernardo and Anita also represent Puerto Ricans who come to the United States in search of a better life while the majority of their families still live in Puerto Rico. Coming to a place like New York City—where the cost of living and is higher and the living spaces are smaller than most other U.S. cities—can be a rude awakening that can be handled with optimism or pessimism. This dichotomy is represented in one of the musical’s most famous song-and-dance numbers: “America,” with Anita taking the lead for the optimistic side, and Bernardo taking the lead for the pessimistic side.

A noticeable difference in this “West Side Story” remake is that the Puerto Ricans speak a lot more Spanish—and there are no subtitles. It’s a clear indication that Spielberg (who is one of the movie’s producers) wanted this version of “West Side Story” to be more inclusive to Spanish-speaking audiences and present a more realistic depiction of people who speak more than one language. Although the 2021 version of “West Side Story” has no subtitles for the Spanish-language dialogue, it’s easy for people who don’t know Spanish to figure out what what’s being said, based on the cast members’ tones of voice, body language and facial expressions.

In this movie remake, the Puerto Rican characters are less concerned about assimilating in English-speaking America than their counterparts were in the 1961 version of “West Side Story.” Valentina even says so, when she makes this comment about her interracial marriage: “I married a gringo. He thinks that makes me a gringo. I ain’t.”

“West Side Story” was ahead of its time for having the androgynous Anybodys character, who is presented in both movies as a young transgender man, during an era when the word “transgender” did not exist. In the “West Side Story” remake, Anybodys (played by Iris Menas) is a lookout for the Jets. Anybodys is sometimes referred to as a “girl,” but Anybodys would rather be just one of the guys.

There’s a point in the movie where people start using male pronouns to describe Anybodys—and that makes Anybodys very happy. In the 2021 “West Side Story” remake, Anybodys has less screen time than the Anybodys in the first “West Side Story” movie. The character is depicted with more subtlety and less-exaggerated mannerisms in the remake.

Just like in the original “West Side Story,” the movie begins with the introduction of the Jets, followed by the Sharks, and the tensions between the two gangs. The Jets are first seen emerging from the rubble with paint cans, which they use to commit vandalism on an outdoor wall mural of the Puerto Rican flag. (This vandalism of a Puerto Rican flag mural is new to the remake.) The Sharks see this vandalism, are offended, and a brawl ensues between the two gangs until police arrive to break up the fight.

On the scene is Officer Krupke (played by Brian d’Arcy James), a “regular Joe” cop who would like nothing more than for the Jets and the Sharks to stop fighting each other, even though he knows that’s not very realistic. Krupke’s swaggering boss is Lieutenant Schrank (played by Corey Stoll), who’s even more impatient with these rival gangs than Krupke is. Schrank gruffly insults the Jets by calling them “the last of the can’t-make-it Caucasians,” and he barks this order: “Evict yourself from my crime scene, Bernardo!”

The Jets and the Sharks don’t trust each other, but both gangs have even less trust of the police. It’s why no one in either gang will snitch when the police try to find out who started the violent fight. No one is arrested this time, but the fight’s not over. As soon as the cops leave, Riff and Bernardo agree that there should be a rumble to decide which gang will come out on top. Anita and María openly express their disapproval of Bernardo’s gang activities, but he doesn’t pay attention to them, and there’s not much María and Anita can do to stop him.

Riff is somewhat of a reluctant chief of the Jets because he became the default leader when Tony was sent to prison for attempted murder of a young man during a gang fight. Now on parole, Tony is keeping his distance from the Jets because he truly wants to turn his life around and no longer be a criminal. Tony will not rejoin the Jets, despite Riff’s constant pleas.

Faist’s version of Riff has an insecure scrappiness to how he handles his gang leadership, indicating that Riff craves and fears power. He looks like he’s got a more fascinating and harrowing story to tell than Russ Tamblyn’s version of Riff in the first “West Side Story” movie. Tamblyn’s Riff looks like a frat boy gone bad. Faist’s version of Riff looks like a real street survivor who’s had a rough life and has the facial scars to prove it.

Riff has a platinum-blonde girlfriend named Velma (played by Maddie Ziegler), who is loyal and loving to him, but she disapproves of him getting involved in violent crimes. It’s a change from the Velma in the first “West Side Story” movie, where Velma was much more of a gang moll who looked the other way or encouraged Riff to be a violent thug. Ziegler became an actress after years as a professional dancer. Her dance expertise shows in Velma’s feisty and eye-catching dance moves.

In this “West Side Story” remake, Tony goes into more details about his life in prison in ways that weren’t in the original “West Side Story” movie. He still talks more about how prison changed him and made him determined to lead a law-abiding and productive life, but he expresses more guilt about the crime and more remorse about how he hurt the victim. After he was released from prison, Valentina gave Tony a job and a place to stay. (He lives in the store’s basement.) Valentina has known the members of the Jets since they were children. She has become a mother figure to Tony, who is estranged from his parents.

Just like in the original “West Side Story,” Tony and María meet and have a “love at first sight” encounter at a dance attended by local young people, including the members of the Jets and the Sharks. The dance’s chaperone announces at the dance that it’s a “social experiment” to better integrate white people and Latinos who live in the area. “And then you can all go back to your feral lives,” the chaperone cynically adds. However, racial segregation is still a fact of life that the attendees find difficult to change at this dance. They still congregate in groups according to race, including the inevitable dance-off where Anita and Bernardo outshine everyone else.

As an example of how much slicker this version of “West Side Story” is, the dance is held at a shiny-looking, well-lit school gymnasium, compared to the somewhat dark and grimy-looking dancehall in the original “West Side Story” movie. It’s a setting that looks a little too polished and well-kept for an area that’s supposed to be populated by people who are struggling financially and has public schools that are more run-down than they should be.

Tony has come to this dance reluctantly, after much persuasion from Riff, who wants to use the dance as away for Tony to see all of his former gang pals again. But once Tony and María lock eyes, meet cute behind the gym bleachers, and exchange some smitten dialogue, Tony can’t think of anything else but being with María. Tony and María couple up immediately by dancing together and having their first kiss just a few minutes after meeting that night. They agree to meet the next day at a museum.

Tony and María’s attraction to each other doesn’t go unnoticed. Bernardo orders Tony to stay away from María . Bernardo would rather that María date someone who’s Puerto Rican, such as his mild-mannered best friend Chino (played by Josh Andrés Rivera), who is not a member of the Sharks, although Chino would like to be. Chino was sort of Maria’s date at this dance, but Chino and María’s relationship has always been about platonic friendship only.

At the dance, Bernardo gets a little rough by pushing Tony away when he sees that Tony is interested in María. Riff and the rest of the Jets come to Tony’s defense, which leads the Sharks to get in on the dispute. María and Anita are disgusted with all of this seemingly never-ending fighting between the Sharks and the Jets, so they leave the dance. However, Tony doesn’t join his former gang cronies in this fight and instead runs out of the dance to look for María , but she is long gone.

The next day at Doc’s store, Tony has told Valentina about this new romance. He asks Valentina how to say, “I want to be with you forever” in Spanish, so that he can make this declaration of love to María on their first date. These kids move fast. Even Valentina notices how quickly Tony wants to commit to María, by cracking this joke: “You sure you don’t want to ask her out for coffee first?” Because this movie is set in the 1950s, when it was more common for people in the U.S. to get married in their late teens and early 20s, this swift courtship is easier to believe than if the movie had been set in the present day.

María and Tony are blissfully happy together in the short time that they’ve known each other, but their romance is threatened by the growing hatred between the Jets and the Sharks. The “West Side Story” remake keeps the sentiment that María and Tony have a pure love for each other. It’s a love that borders on obsession, especially in a scene where María gets some very bad news about something Tony did to hurt one of María’s loved ones, and her priority is to comfort Tony. However, there’s a slight but noticeable difference in how the remake presents this scene, which is in a better way than the first “West Side Story” movie.

The “West Side Story” remake has no drastic revisions to the songs’ tempos or arrangements. The movie also doesn’t add any original songs that were written specifically for this remake, in an attempt to get awards for new and original movie music. The song placements mostly stay true to the original, with some notable exceptions.

“I Feel Pretty,” Maria’s joyous ode to romance and self-confidence, has a different setting. In the original “West Side Story” movie, Maria sang “I Feel Pretty” in a private room with three seamstresses. In the “West Side Story” remake makes this musical number a much more public spectacle.

María works as a cleaning woman at a boutique. She sings “I Feel Pretty” while dancing through the rooms of the boutique with several other cleaning women during after-hours. This setting gives the scene a more aspirational tone to what the characters do, as they let loose in a boutique where they work but probably can’t afford the clothes that are sold in the boutique.

Fans of Moreno will have to wait until the last third of the movie for Valentina’s big musical moment: the show-stopping tune “Somewhere,” which she performs solo. It’s an absolute exquisite rendition that might make some viewers more than a little misty-eyed. All of the cast members rise to the occasion to make this “West Side Story” very entertaining and emotion-filled. There isn’t a mediocre performer in the movie’s principal cast.

Zegler carries her scenes as María with an eager-to-please demeanor. She doesn’t have the star power of Wood, but Zegler and Elgort have nice chemistry together as María and Tony. Elgort doesn’t always sound like the working-class New Yorker that he’s supposed to be as Tony when he speaks, but Elgort gives Tony the type of heartthrob charm that makes it easy to see why María falls so hard and fast for him. Elgort and Zegler have singing voices that are very good, but not particularly distinctive.

DeBose lights up every scene that she’s in and is the breakout star of the movie. Her version of Anita has a commanding presence and the flashiest dance movies. Debose’s larger-than-life portrayal of Anita is ideal for this type of splashy movie musical. Anita has a big personality, but she also has a more realistic view of life and love than starry-eyed María. And that’s why, for adults with enough life experience, Anita is a more relatable character than María.

Alvarez’s Bernardo has more machismo, as well as a little more emotional depth, than the Bernardo of the original “West Side Story” movie. Bernardo uses his arrogance to cover up his insecurities over feeling like he’s someone who’s “not good enough,” so he over-compensates. What he sees as being over-protective of María is really being over-controlling. What he sees as pride in being a Shark is really an endorsement of violent racism.

In the original “West Side Story,” Anita and Bernardo were an attractive couple, but you never got the impression that they had much romantic passion for each other. There’s more believable sexual heat with Anita and Bernardo in this “West Side Story” remake. DeBose and Alvarez seem to have natural chemistry with each other as Anita and Bernardo, who sees himself as the ultimate alpha male. Sex in the movie is hinted at but not explicitly shown. For example, Anita and Bernardo kiss passionately before slamming a bedroom door behind them; María and Tony wake up together half-dressed in bed.

As for the dazzling dance numbers, “West Side Story” movie remake choreographer Justin Peck brings his ballet background to the movie, with dance moves that are more complicated but a little more graceful, enhancing the stellar work by choreographer/director Robbins for the first “West Side Story” movie. DeBose is a standout in the dance scenes, which have a more sensuous and unbridled energy than the original “West Side Story” movie. (And that’s probably because depictions of sexuality in movies had more restrictions in movies released in 1961, compared to 2021.)

For the “West Side Story” remake, cinematographer Janusz Kaminski and production design make things look bigger and more over-the-top in scale. An overcast night can’t just be an overcast night. It looks like a fog-filled, full-moon scene out of a horror movie. A crumbling slum area can’t look like a crumbling slum area. It looks like a bombed-out war zone. It’s all very impressive, in terms of visuals.

And yet somehow, this more ambitious, bigger-budget version of “West Side Story” loses some of the neighborhood intimacy that the original “West Side Story” movie had. Everything looks professionally done in the remake, but just a little too staged and calculated. And maybe that’s because the movie was filmed and built on soundstages. (The “West Side Story” remake was filmed at Steiner Studios in Brooklyn.) Sometimes bigger isn’t always better.

The ending of the “West Side Story” remake doesn’t end as abruptly as the first “West Side Story” does. Without giving away too many details, it’s enough to say that the remake has a more melodramatic ending with some preachiness. It’s a revision that some “West Side Story” fans might like, while others won’t. This slightly new ending doesn’t take away from the overall spirit of “West Side Story,” which is a celebration of life and love, with the knowledge that both can be precious, fleeting and experienced with a lot of heartache.

20th Century Studios will release “West Side Story” in U.S. cinemas on December 10, 2021.

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