Review: ‘Black Panther: Wakanda Forever,’ starring Letitia Wright, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Angela Bassett, Tenoch Huerta Mejía, Winston Duke and Martin Freeman

November 8, 2022

by Carla Hay

Letitia Wright in “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” (Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios)

“Black Panther: Wakanda Forever”

Directed by Ryan Coogler

Some language in French and Yucatec with subtitles

Culture Representation: Taking place in various parts of Earth, the superhero action film “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” features a racially diverse cast of characters (black, Latino and white) representing the working-class, middle-class and royalty.

Culture Clash: After the death of King T’Challa, the fictional African nation of Wakanda becomes under siege from various factions, including the secret underwater kingdom of Talokan, that want Wakanda’s help in obtaining the precious metal vibranium. 

Culture Audience: “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” will appeal primarily to people who are fans of the “Black Panther” franchise, the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) and superhero movies that include multiculturalism issues.

Tenoch Huerta Mejía in “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” (Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios)

In more ways than one, “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” shows how healing from a tragedy can turn into a triumph. This top-notch sequel to 2018’s “Black Panther” is an epic story of grief, loyalty, greed and the resilience of the human spirit. “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” should more than satisfy fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) and will inspire repeat viewings. Do people need to see “Black Panther” before seeing “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever”? No, but it certainly helps, especially in understanding the backgrounds of the characters who have the most poignant moments in this sequel.

Directed by Ryan Coogler (who co-wrote the “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” screenplay with Joe Robert Cole), “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” puts the women of the fictional African nation of Wakanda in the front and center of a story that also pays respectful tribute to Wakanda’s deceased King T’Challa, played by Chadwick Boseman in 2018’s “Black Panther.” Coogler directed and co-wrote (with Cole) the first “Black Panther” movie, which helps in keeping a consistent tone for “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever.”

The beginning of “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” shows King T’Challa’s younger sister Princess Shuri (played by Letitia Wright) frantically trying to find a medical solution to save T’Challa, who is dying from an unnamed illness. (Boseman tragically died of colon cancer in 2020. He was 43.) All of Shuri’s efforts don’t work, and T’Challa passes away.

The people of Wakanda have an elaborate funeral for T’Challa that includes mourning his death and celebrating his life. Everyone is dressed in white for this event. At the end of the funeral, T’Challa’s casket floats up into the sky. As explained in the first “Black Panther” movie and in Marvel’s “Black Panther” comic books, Wakanda is a self-sufficient nation that is somewhat of a utopia and where supernatural things can occur. Wakanda is protected by an all-female army called the Dora Milaje.

One year after T’Challa’s death, Shuri and her mother Queen Ramonda (played by Angela Bassett) are grieving, but Shuri has had a more diffcult time trying to move on with her life. Shuri is a genius scientist who blames herself for not being able to find a medical cure that could have saved T’Challa. Much of Shuri’s storyline in “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” has to do with Shuri’s grief and other traumatic things she experiences in the movie.

Meanwhile, Queen Ramonda has to contend with pressure from different entities that want Wakanda’s help in finding vibranium, a rare metal that has the power to harness kinetic energy. An early scene in the movie shows a regal and confident Ramonda at a United Nations meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, one year after T’Challa’s death. During this meeting with world leaders, Ramonda is told that the United States is disappointed that Wakanda has not shared resources in the quest to find vibranium.

However, Wakanda (a self-sufficient nation that is somewhat of a utopia) has a policy not to get involved in other nations’ politics, and Ramonda reiterates that fact. She also has members of Dora Milaje bring in some captives: several men who tried to invade one of Wakanda’s member facilities that handles vibranium. A flashback shows how members of the Dora Milaje captured these invaders. Ramonda’s sternly tells the assembled officials that she knows that a member state of the United Nations was probably behind this attack, and this capture serves as an “olive branch” warning for this attack not to happen on Wakanda again.

Meanwhile, a U.S. ship in the Atlantic Ocean has been looking for vibranium underwater. The ship then experiences something unexpected and bizarre. Crew members of the ship seem to go into a daze and start jumping off of the ship to their death. And then, a group of blue-skinned people rise out of the ocean and attack the ship. The attackers’ leader is dressed like a Mayan king and has wings on his feet that allow him to fly. Viewers later find out that his name is Namor (played Tenoch Huerta Mejía), and he’s the ruler of Talokan, a hidden nation under the sea.

One evening, back in Wakanda, Ramonda and Shuri have a heart-to-heart talk on a beach. Ramonda is concerned about Shuri’s emotional well-being because Shuri seems to be deeply depressed. Shuri tries to brush off her mother’s concerns. Ramonda says she has a secret about T’Challa that she wants to tell Shuri. But just as she’s about to tell Shuri, Namor appears out of the water.

Namor is not there to pay a friendly visit. He essentially tells Ramonda and Shuri that Talokan needs Wakanda’s help to defend themselves from extinction and to get vibranium. If Wakanda refuses to help, Talokan will declare war on the world, and Wakanda will be Talokan’s first target. A stunned Ramonda tells Namor that Wakanda does not get involved in other people’s wars and refuses to give in to his demand. Namor leaves and ominously says that he will return in one week.

Meanwhile, CIA operative Everett K. Ross (played by Martin Freeman) reprises his role from 2018’s “Black Panther.” Everett is an ally to Wakanda but he gets into conflicts about it with higher-ranking agent Valentina Allegra de Fontaine (played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus), who is pressuring Wakanda to cooperate with the U.S. government to find vibranium. Valentina (who communicates with a brittle, sarcastic tone) has another, more personal connection to Everett that is revealed in the movie.

Also reprising their roles from “Blank Panther” are Okoye (played by Danai Gurira), the courageous leader of the Dora Milaje; Ayo (played by Florence Kasumba), a powerful enforcer of the Dora Milaje; M’Baku (played by Winston Duke), the leader of Jabariland, Wakanda’s isolated region known for its snow and mountains; and Nakia (played by Lupita Nyong’o), who is the best spy in Wakanda’s history and T’Challa’s former love partner. New to the Dora Milaje team is Aneka (played by Michaela Coel), a high-ranking member.

During the course of the story, Shuri and Okoye travel to Haiti, where viewers find out that Nakia has been living for the past six years. In Haiti, Nakia has been working as a teacher of children in elementary school. Shuri and Okoye have to plead with Nakia to come back to Wakanda to help them, but Nakia is very reluctant to go back. Why did Nakia leave Wakanda? And why is Nakia reluctant to go back? Those questions are answered in the movie.

Wakanda also has another ally, who finds herself involved in this brewing war through no choice of her own. Her name is Riri Williams (played by Dominique Thorne), a brilliant 19-year-old MIT student and aspiring scientist. Riri and Shuri are thrown together in circumstances where they have to learn to work together. Riri is sometimes overwhelmed by the danger that comes her way, but she can be counted on to come up with helpful ideas. She has a sassy personality that is the comic relief in the movie.

Meanwhile, Namor has been assembling his own troops to prepare for war. His two main sidekicks are Talokan’s strongest warrior Attuma (played by Alex Livinalli) and Talokan’s most fearless warrior Namora (played by Mabel Cadena), who have unwavering loyalty to Talokan and their leader, Namor. At one point in the movie, viewers find out more about Talokan and Namor’s backstory to explain why he is on such a brutal revenge mission.

“Black Panther” won Academy Awards for its production design (led by Hannah Beachler) and its costume design (led by Ruth E. Carter), with Beachler and Carter both leading the same teams for “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever.” The production design for “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” is even more elaborate and awe-inspiring, particularly in how Talokan was designed. (It looks like an underwater Mayan paradise inspired by Atlantis.) The costume design for “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” is also Oscar-worthy, although many of the Dora Milaje costumes are understandably the same or similar to as they were in “Black Panther.”

“Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” has better visual effects than “Black Panther.” The cinematography is also an improvement over the first “Black Panther” movie, particularly when it comes to the scenes in Talokan and some of the camera angles during the fight scenes. Every action sequence looks believable, given the characters’ superpowers. But all of these dazzling components to the film would be wasted if the story wasn’t compelling and the acting performances weren’t up to par.

Shuri becomes the heart and soul of “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever,” as she comes to terms with T’Challa’s death; faces doubts and moral dilemmas about where he should put her loyalties; and sometimes clashes with her strong-willed mother Ramonda on decision to make about Wakanda’s future. Wright gives a standout performance in having to convey a wide myriad of emotions of someone who is the heir to the throne but has inner and exterior conflicts about her leadership, while living in the shadow of T’Challa and his legacy.

Bassett is also noteworthy in her performance as Romanda, who has to find a way to reconcile her pain with a possible new direction for Wakanda. Huerta Mejía a gives solid performance as the movie’s villain, who is alternately stoic and filled with rage. Namor isn’t the most fearsome villain of the MCU, but his backstory will make viewers see that underneath his anger is a lot of personal pain and pride for his people.

Because of the real-life death of Boseman, there are expected tearjerking moments when the movie shows flashbacks of T’Challa. There’s also the brief return of another major character from the first “Black Panther” movie, with the character appearing to Shuri in a vision. A mid-credits scene (there is no end-credits scene) in “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” shines a bright light of hope for the future of Wakanda, but it’s with a bittersweet tone that T’Challa is immensely beloved and will always be missed.

Marvel Studios will release “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” in U.S. cinemas on November 11, 2022.

Chadwick Boseman dead at 43; acclaimed star of ‘Black Panther’ battled colon cancer

August 28, 2020

by Carla Hay

Chadwick Boseman (Photo courtesy of ABC/Image Group LA) 

Chadwick Boseman, the charismatic and critically acclaimed actor who starred in the 2018 blockbuster “Black Panther,” died of colon cancer at his Los Angeles home on August 28, 2020. He was 43. In a public statement issued by his family, Boseman had been diagnosed with cancer in 2016, but he never revealed this diagnosis to the public, according to the Associated Press.

In addition to starring in “Black Panther,” Boseman had roles in other Marvel superhero movies such as 2016’s “Captain America: Civil War,” 2018’s “Avengers: Infinity War” and 2019’s “Avengers: Endgame.” He also starred as several African American icons in biopics, such as baseball player Jackie Robinson in the 2013 movie “42,” singer James Brown in 2014’s “Get on Up” and Thurgood Marshall in 2017’s “Marshall.” He also starred in the cop drama “21 Bridges,” which was his first movie in which he was a producer. Boseman’s last two film roles were for Netflix: He portrayed a Vietnam War soldier in the 2020 drama “Da 5 Bloods” (directed and co-written by Spike Lee) and co-starred with Viola Davis in the drama “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,” which does not have a release date yet.

Born on November 29, 1976, in Anderson, South Carolina, Boseman graduated from Howard University in 2000, with a bachelor of fine arts degree in directing. Two important mentors he had during his college years were Oscar-winning actor Denzel Washington (who reportedly paid for Boseman’s college tuition) and actress Phylicia Rashad, who was one of his teachers at Howard. Boseman was also a graduate of Digital Film Academy and aspired to be a director.

Boseman made his film debut in 2008’s “The Express.” Before getting starring roles movies, he had roles in TV shows and in theater, most notably in the 2010 short-lived NBC series “Persons Unknown” and in a recurring role in 2008 and 2009 in the ABC Family series “Lincoln Heights,” which was on the air from 2007 to 2010. But he was best known for playing African king superhero T’Challa in “Black Panther,” which was the second highest-grossing film of 2018 in the world (with $1.3 billion in ticket sales), second to “Avengers: Infinity War,” which had worldwide ticket sales of $2 billion. Of the $1.3 billion that “Black Panther” had in worldwide ticket sales, $700 million were ticket sales in the U.S., making “Black Panther” the highest-grossing film in the U.S. in 2018.

“Black Panther” won numerous awards, including three Oscars: for costume design, production design and original score. Boseman and the rest of “Black Panther” stars won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding by a Cast in a Motion Picture, and the movie won several NAACP Image Awards. A sequel to “Black Panther” had been announced to be released in 2022, but had not begun filming at the time that Boseman passed away. As of now, it’s unclear what will happen to the movie because of Boseman’s death. Also in limbo is the movie “Yasuke,” in which Boseman had the title role, but the movie hadn’t begun filming at the time of his death.

The Boseman family statement says: “A true fighter, Chadwick persevered through it all, and brought you many of the films you have come to love so much. From ‘Marshall’ to ‘Da 5 Bloods,’ August Wilson’s ‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’ and several more—all were filmed during and between countless surgeries and chemotherapy. It was the honor of his career to bring King T’Challa to life in ‘Black Panther.’”

Boseman is survived by his wife Taylor Simone Ledward and his parents Leroy and Karen Boseman.

2019 NAACP Image Awards: ‘Black Panther’ wins the most prizes

March 30, 2019

by Carla Hay

Black Panther
Michael B. Jordan and Chadwick Boseman in “Black Panther” (Photo courtesy of Disney/Marvel Studios)

With eight prizes, the blockbuster superhero film “Black Panther” was the top winner for the 50th annual NAACP Image Awards.”Black Panther” was the leading contender going in the ceremony, by having 12 nominations. The biggest awards were presented in a live ceremony on TV One at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on March 30, 2019. The majority of the show’s prizes were given during a NAACP Image Awards non-televised dinner in Los Angeles on March 29, 2019. Anthony Anderson hosted the televised NAACP Image Awards ceremony for the sixth consecutive year. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People produces the awards, which are give to those are outstanding representations for people of color in entertainment. Eligible nominations are for entertainment that was released or premiered in 2018.

The awards for “Black Panther” were for Outstanding Motion Picture, Outstanding Ensemble Cast in a Motion Picture, Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture (Chadwick Boseman), Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture (Michael B. Jordan) and Outstanding Breakthrough Performance in a Motion Picture (Letitia Wright).

Beyoncé was named Entertainer of the Year, while her husband Jay-Z received the President’s Award, a non-competitive category. In other non-competitive categories, politician Maxine Waters received the Chairman Award, while singer/songwriter Ne-Yo received the Black & Positively Golden Music Award.

In the TV categories, the sitcom “Black-ish” reigned supreme, winning five of out its nine nominations: Outstanding Comedy Series; Outstanding Actor in a Comedy Series (Anthony Anderson); Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series (Tracee Ellis Ross); Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series (Marcus Scribner); Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series (Marsai Martin).

Actor/comedian Chris Rock, who presented the award for Outstanding Comedy Series, poked fun at “Empire” co-star Jussie Smollett and the controversy over Smollett’s claim that he was physically attacked by two homophobic racists in Chicago on January 29, 2019. It’s a claim that led to Smollett being arrested and charged on March 8 with felony disorderly conduct after police and Chicago prosecutors said that Smollett staged the attack and lied to the police about it. The charges were dropped on March 26.

Rock said on stage: “They said no Jussie Smollett jokes. Yeah, I know, I know. What a waste of light skin. You know what I could do with that light skin? That curly hair? My career would be outta here! I would be fucking running Hollywood! What the hell was he thinking? Jussie … you ain’t getting no respect from me.”

Smollett and the other cast members from “Empire” did not attend the ceremony or the pre-ceremony dinner. Smollett was nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series, but lost to Jesse Williams of “Grey’s Anatomy.” Meanwhile, Taraji P. Henson of “Empire” won the prize for Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series.

In the recording categories, Ella Mai won the most awards (three): Outstanding New Artist; Outstanding Song – Contemporary (for “Boo’d Up”); and Outstanding Album (for “Ella Mai”).

Here is the complete list of winners nominations for the NAACP Image Awards:

*=winner

SPECIAL AWARDS

Chairman’s Award: Maxine Waters

President’s Award: Jay-Z

Vanguard Award: Tom Joyner

Black & Positively Golden Music Award: Ne-Yo

 

Entertainer of the Year

Beyoncé*
Chadwick Boseman
LeBron James
Regina King
Ryan Coogler

MOTION PICTURE

Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture

Chadwick Boseman – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*
Michael B. Jordan – Creed II (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios)
Denzel Washington – The Equalizer 2 (Columbia Pictures)
John David Washington – BlacKkKlansman (Focus Features)
Stephan James – If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)

Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture

Amandla Stenberg – The Hate U Give (20th Century Fox)*
Constance Wu – Crazy Rich Asians (Warner Bros. Pictures)
KiKi Layne – If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)
Sanaa Lathan – Nappily Ever After (Marc Platt Production/Badabing Pictures Production for Netflix)
Viola Davis – Widows (20th Century Fox)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

Brian Tyree Henry – If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)
Mahershala Ali – Green Book (Universal Pictures, Participant Media, DreamWorks)
Michael B. Jordan – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*
Russell Hornsby – The Hate U Give (20th Century Fox)
Winston Duke – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Danai Gurira – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*
Letitia Wright – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)
Lupita Nyong’o – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)
Regina Hall – The Hate U Give (20th Century Fox)
Regina King – If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)

Outstanding Independent Motion Picture

BlacKkKlansman (Focus Features)
If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)*
Nappily Ever After (Marc Platt Production/Badabing Pictures Production for Netflix)
Sorry to Bother You (Annapurna Pictures)
Traffik (Codeblack Films/Lionsgate Entertainment)

Outstanding Breakthrough Performance in a Motion Picture

Storm Reid – A Wrinkle in Time (Walt Disney Studios)
Letitia Wright – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*
Winston Duke – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)
John David Washington – BlacKkKlansman (Focus Features)
KiKi Layne – If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)

Outstanding Ensemble Cast in a Motion Picture

Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*
BlacKkKlansman (Focus Features)
Crazy Rich Asians (Warner Bros. Pictures)
The Hate U Give (20th Century Fox)
Widows (20th Century Fox)

Outstanding Motion Picture

Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*
BlacKkKlansman (Focus Features)
Crazy Rich Asians (Warner Bros. Pictures)
If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)
The Hate U Give (20th Century Fox)

TELEVISION

Outstanding Comedy Series

Atlanta (FX Networks)
Black-ish (ABC)*
Dear White People (Netflix)
Grown-ish (Freeform)
Insecure (HBO)

Outstanding Actor in a Comedy Series

Anthony Anderson, Black-ish (ABC)*
Cedric the Entertainer, The Neighborhood (CBS)
Donald Glover, Atlanta (FX Networks)
Dwayne Johnson, Ballers (HBO)
Tracy Morgan, The Last O.G. (TBS)

Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series

Danielle Brooks, Orange Is the New Black (Netflix)
Issa Rae, Insecure (HBO)
Logan Browning, Dear White People (Netflix)
Tracee Ellis Ross, Black-ish (ABC)*
Yara Shahidi, Grown-ish (Freeform)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Jay Ellis, Insecure (HBO)
John David Washington, Ballers (HBO)
Laurence Fishburne, Black-ish (ABC)
Marcus Scribner, Black-ish (ABC)*
Tituss Burgess, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (Netflix)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Essence Atkins, Marlon (NBC)
Marsai Martin, Black-ish (ABC)*
Natasha Rothwell, Insecure (HBO)
Uzo Aduba, Orange Is the New Black (Netflix)
Yvonne Orji, Insecure (HBO)

Outstanding Drama Series

How to Get Away With Murder (ABC)
Power (Starz)*
Queen Sugar (OWN)
The Chi (Showtime)
This Is Us (NBC)

Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series

Jason Mitchell, The Chi (Showtime)
Keith David, Greenleaf (OWN)
Kofi Siriboe, Queen Sugar (OWN)
Omari Hardwick, Power (Starz)*
Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us (NBC)

Outstanding Actress in a Drama Series

Alfre Woodard, Marvel’s Luke Cage (Netflix)
Naturi Naughton, Power (Starz)
Rutina Wesley, Queen Sugar (OWN)
Taraji P. Henson, Empire (FOX)*
Viola Davis, How to Get Away with Murder (ABC)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Jesse Williams, Grey’s Anatomy (ABC)*
Joe Morton, Scandal (ABC)
Jussie Smollett, Empire (FOX)
Romany Malco, A Million Little Things (ABC)
Wendell Pierce, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan (Prime Video)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

CCH Pounder, NCIS: New Orleans (CBS)
Lynn Whitfield, Greenleaf (OWN)*
Sanaa Lathan, The Affair (Showtime)
Susan Kelechi Watson, This Is Us (NBC)
Thandie Newton, Westworld (HBO)

Outstanding Guest Performance in a Comedy or Drama Series

Erika Alexander – Black Lightning – Book of Consequences: Chapter Three: Master Lowery (CW)
Kendrick Lamar – Power – Happy Birthday (Starz)
Kerry Washington – How to Get Away With Murder – Lahey v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (ABC)*
Loretta Devine – Love Is – Rose (Going Home) (OWN)
Tisha Campbell-Martin – Empire – Without Apology (Fox)

Outstanding Television Movie, Limited-Series or Dramatic Special

Behind the Movement (TV One)
Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert (NBC)
Seven Seconds (Netflix)
The Bobby Brown Story (BET)*
The Simone Biles Story: Courage to Soar (Lifetime)

Outstanding Actor in a Television Movie, Limited-Series or Dramatic Special

Brandon Victor Dixon, Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert (NBC)
John Legend, Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert (NBC)
Michael B. Jordan, Fahrenheit 451 (HBO)*
Russell Hornsby, Seven Seconds (Netflix)
Woody McClain, The Bobby Brown Story (BET)

Outstanding Actress in a Television Movie, Limited-Series or Dramatic Special

Anna Deavere Smith, Notes From the Field (HBO)
Gabrielle Dennis, The Bobby Brown Story (BET)
Jeanté Godlock, The Simone Biles Story: Courage to Soar (Lifetime)
Regina King, Seven Seconds (Netflix)*
Toni Braxton, Faith Under Fire: The Antoinette Tuff Story (Lifetime)

Outstanding News/Information (Series or Special)

A Thousand Words With Michelle Obama (BET)
AM Joy (MSNBC)
Angela Rye’s State of the Union (BET)
Oprah Winfrey Presents: Becoming Michelle Obama (OWN)*
Unsung (TV One)

Outstanding Talk Series

ESPN’s First Take (ESPN)
Red Table Talk (Facebook Watch)
The Daily Show with Trevor Noah (Comedy Central)
The Real (Syndicated)*
The View (ABC)

Outstanding Reality Program, Reality Competition or Game Show (Series)

Iyanla: Fix My Life (OWN)*
Lip Sync Battle (Paramount Network)
RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1)
Shark Tank (ABC)
The Voice (NBC)

Outstanding Variety Show (Series or Special)

2 Dope Queens (HBO)
Black Girls Rock! (BET)*
Bruno Mars: 24K Magic Live at the Apollo (CBS)
Saturday Night Live (NBC)
Trevor Noah: Son of Patricia (Netflix)

Outstanding Children’s Program

Doc McStuffins (Disney Junior)*
Marvel’s Avengers: Black Panther’s Quest (Disney XD)
Motown Magic (Netflix)
Sesame Street (HBO)
Top Chef Junior (Universal Kids)

Outstanding Performance by a Youth (Series, Special, Television Movie or Limited-Series)

Alex R. Hibbert – The Chi (Showtime)
Lonnie Chavis -This Is Us (NBC)
Lyric Ross – This Is Us (NBC)
Marsai Martin – Black-ish (ABC)*
Miles Brown – Black-ish (ABC)

Outstanding Host in a Talk or News/Information (Series or Special) – Individual or Ensemble

Jada Pinkett Smith, Adrienne Banfield Norris, Willow Smith – Red Table Talk (Facebook Watch)*
Joy Reid – AM Joy (MSNBC)
LeBron James – The Shop (HBO)
Lester Holt – NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt (NBC)
Trevor Noah – The Daily Show with Trevor Noah (Comedy Central)

Outstanding Host in a Reality/Reality Competition, Game Show or Variety (Series or Special) – Individual or Ensemble

Iyanla Vanzant – Iyanla: Fix My Life (OWN)
LL Cool J – Lip Sync Battle (Paramount Network)
Queen Latifah – Black Girls Rock (BET)
RuPaul – RuPaul’s Drag Race (VH1)
Steve Harvey – Family Feud (Syndication)*

DOCUMENTARY

Outstanding Documentary (Film)

Amazing Grace (Sundial Pictures/Neon)*
Making The Five Heartbeats (Green Lighthouse)
Quincy (Netflix)
RBG (CNN)
Whitney (Roadside Attractions/Miramax)

Outstanding Documentary (Television)

Hope & Fury: MLK, The Movement and the Media (NBC)
King in the Wilderness (HBO)
Say Her Name: The Life and Death of Sandra Bland (HBO)*
Shut Up & Dribble (Showtime)
Time For Ilhan (Fuse)

WRITING

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series

Justin Simien – Dear White People – Chapter 1 (Netflix)
Marquita J. Robinson – GLOW – Work the Leg (Netflix)
Peter H. Saji – Black-ish – Purple Rain (ABC)
Regina Y. Hicks – Insecure – High-Like (HBO)
Trevor Noah , Steve Budow, David Kibuuka, Zhubin Parang, Dan Amira, Lauren Sarver Means, Mr. Daniel Radosh, David Angelo, Devin Trey Delliquanti, Zachary DiLanzo – The Daily Show with Trevor Noah – 23087 Alex Wagner (Comedy Central)*

Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series

Janine Sherman Barrois – Claws – Cracker Casserole (TNT)
Kay Oyegun – This Is Us – This Big, Amazing, Beautiful Life (NBC)*
Lena Waithe – The Chi – Pilot (Showtime)
Patrick Joseph Charles – Black Lightning – Sins of the Father: The Book of Redemption (The CW/Netflix)
Lena Waithe, Dime Davis, – The Chi – The Whistle (Showtime)

Outstanding Writing in a Motion Picture (Television)

Anna Deavere Smith – Notes From the Field (HBO)
J. David Shanks – Seven Seconds: Matters of Life and Death (Netflix)
Katrina M. O’Gilvie – Behind the Movement (TV One)
Ramin Bahrani, Amir Naderi – Fahrenheit 451 (HBO)
Shalisha Francis – Seven Seconds: Of Gods and Men (Netflix)*

Outstanding Writing in a Motion Picture (Film)

Barry Jenkins – If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)
Boots Riley – Sorry To Bother You (Annapurna Pictures)
Charlie Wachtel, David Rabinowitz, Kevin Willmott, Spike Lee – BlacKkKlansman (Focus Features)
Peter Chiarelli, Adele Lim – Crazy Rich Asians (Warner Bros. Pictures)
Ryan Coogler, Joe Robert Cole – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*

DIRECTING

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series

Donald Glover – Atlanta – FUBU (FX Networks)*
Gina Rodriguez – Jane the Virgin – Chapter Seventy-Four (CW)
Hiro Murai – Atlanta – Teddy Perkins (FX Networks)
Ken Whittingham – Atypical – “Ernest Shackleton’s Rules for Survival” (Netflix)
Millicent Shelton – Insecure – High-Like (HBO)

Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series

Ayoka Chenzira – Queen Sugar – Here Beside the River (OWN)
Deborah Ann Chow – Better Call Saul – Something Stupid (AMC)*
Dee Rees – Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams – Kill All Others (Prime Video)
Salli Richardson-Whitfield – Marvel’s Luke Cage – I Get Physical (Netflix)
Zetna Fuentes – How to Get Away With Murder – Lahey v. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (ABC)

Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture (Television)

Ernest Dickerson – Seven Seconds: Until It Do (Netflix)
Ramin Bahrani – Fahrenheit 451 (HBO)
Tanya Hamilton – Seven Seconds: That What Follows (Netflix)
Tracy Heather Strain – Lorraine Hansberry: Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart (PBS)*
Victoria Mahoney – Seven Seconds: Witness for the Prosecution (Netflix)

Outstanding Directing in a Motion Picture (Film)

Barry Jenkins – If Beale Street Could Talk (Annapurna Pictures)
Spike Lee – BlacKkKlansman (Focus Features)
Steve McQueen – Widows (20th Century Fox)
Ryan Coogler – Black Panther (Marvel Studios)*
Alan Hicks, Rashida Jones – Quincy (A Le Train Train\Bob’s Your Uncle\Tribeca Production for Netflix)

ANIMATED/CGI

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance (Television or Film)

Issa Rae – Bojack Horseman (Netflix)
Laya Deleon Hayes – Doc McStuffins (Disney Junior)
Mahershala Ali – Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (Columbia Pictures/Sony Pictures Animation in association with Marvel)
Samuel L. Jackson – Incredibles 2 (Disney and Pixar Animation Studios)*
Shameik Moore – Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (Columbia Pictures/Sony Pictures Animation in association with Marvel)

RECORDING

Outstanding New Artist

Ella Mai (10 Summers/Interscope Records)*
Jade Novah (EMPIRE)
Koryn Hawthorne (RCA Inspiration)
Omar Wilson (BSE Recordings)
Tory Lanez (Mad Love/Interscope Records)

Outstanding Male Artist

Bruno Mars (Atlantic Records)*
Childish Gambino (RCA Records)
John Legend (Columbia Records)
MAJOR. (BOE/Empire)
Raheem DeVaughn (BMG)

Outstanding Female Artist

Andra Day (Warner Bros. Records)
Ella Mai (10 Summers/Interscope Records)
H.E.R. (RCA Records)*
Janelle Monáe (Atlantic Records)
Janet Jackson (Rhythm Nation)

Outstanding Duo, Group or Collaboration

“A Good Night” – John Legend featuring BloodPop (Columbia Records)
“All the Stars” – Black Panther – Kendrick Lamar, SZA (Top Dawg Entertainment/Aftermath/Interscope Records)*
“Could’ve Been” – H.E.R., Bryson Tiller (RCA Records)
“Finesse (Remix)” – Bruno Mars featuring Cardi B (Atlantic Records)
“Everything Is Love” – The Carters (Roc Nation)

Outstanding Jazz Album

Facing Dragons – Christian Sands (Mack Avenue)
Hollywood Africans – Jon Batiste (Verve)
RISE! – Ben Tankard feat. Marion Meadows, Kirk Whalum, Paul Jackson Jr. (Ben-Jamin’ Universal Music)
The Story of Jaz – Jazmin Ghent feat. Jeff Lorber, James P. Lloyd, Kim Scott, Philippe Saisse (Jazmin Ghent Music)*
Waiting for the Sunrise – Camille Thurman (Chesky Records)

Outstanding Gospel Album (Traditional or Contemporary)

Heart. Passion. Pursuit. Live at Passion City Church – Tasha Cobbs Leonard (Motown Gospel)
Hiding Place – Tori Kelly (Capitol Records)
Make Room – Jonathan McReynolds (Entertainment One)
One Nation Under God – Jekalyn Carr (LMG)
Unstoppable – Koryn Hawthorne (RCA Inspirational)*

Outstanding Music Video/Visual Album

Apes**t – The Carters (Roc Nation)
Could’ve Been – H.E.R. feat. Bryson Tiller (RCA Records)
Finesse (Remix) – Bruno Mars featuring Cardi B (Atlantic Records)
This Is America – Childish Gambino (RCA Records)*
All the Stars – Kendrick Lamar, SZA (Top Dawg Entertainment/Aftermath/Interscope Records)

Outstanding Song – Traditional

“Amen” – Andra Day (Warner Bros. Records)
“Better With You In It” – MAJOR. (BOE/Empire)
“Beyond” – Leon Bridges (Columbia Records)
“Long as I Live” – Toni Braxton (Def Jam Recordings)*
“Never Alone” – Tori Kelly featuring Kirk Franklin (Capitol Records)

Outstanding Song – Contemporary

“A Good Night” – John Legend featuring BloodPop (Columbia Records)
“As I Am” – H.E.R. (RCA Records)
“Boo’d Up” – Ella Mai (10 Summers/Interscope Records)*
“Finesse (Remix)” – Bruno Mars feat. Cardi B (Atlantic Records)
“This Is America” – Childish Gambino (RCA Records)

Outstanding Soundtrack/Compilation

“Black Panther The Album: Music From and Inspired By” – Kendrick Lamar, SZA featuring 2Chainz, ScHoolboy Q, Saudi, Khalid, Swae Lee, Vince Staples, Yugen Blakrok, SOB x RBE, Jorja Smith, Anderson Paak, Ab Soul, Reason, Zacari, Babes Wudumo, Sjava, Travis Scott (Interscope Records)*

“Greenleaf, Season 3 (Music from the Original TV series)” – Various Artists (Lions Gate Entertainment)

“Marvel’s Luke Cage Season Two” – Adrian Younge & Ali Shaheed Muhammad (Mondo Music)

“Insecure – Music From the HBO Original Series, Season 3” – Various Artists (RCA Records)

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (Soundtrack From & Inspired by the Motion Picture” – Various Artists (Republic Records)

Outstanding Album

“Dirty Computer” – Janelle Monáe (Atlantic Records)
“Ella Mai” – Ella Mai (10 Summers/Interscope Records)*
“Even More” – MAJOR. (BOE/Empire)
“Everything Is Love” – The Carters (Roc Nation)
“I Used to Know Her: The Prelude” – H.E.R. (RCA Records)

LITERARY

Outstanding Literary Work – Fiction

“An American Marriage” – Tayari Jones (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill)*
“Better Late Than Never” – Kimberla Lawson Roby (Grand Central Publishing)
“Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? Prose Novel” – Jesse James Holland Jr (Titan Books)
“Envy” – Victoria Christopher Murray (Touchstone)
“They Come in All Colors: A Novel” – Malcolm Hansen (Atria Books)

Outstanding Literary Work – Nonfiction

“Barracoon” – Zora Neale Hurston (Amistad HarperCollins Publishers)

“Black Girls Rock! Owning Our Magic. Rocking Our Truth” – Beverly Bond (37 Ink, A Division of Atria Books)

“For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics” – Donna Brazile (Author), Yolanda Caraway (Author), Leah Daughtry (Author), Minyon Moore (Author), Veronica Chambers (With), (St. Martin’s Press)*

“May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem” – Imani Perry (University of North Carolina Press)

“The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row” – Anthony Ray Hinton (Author), Lara Love Hardin (With), (St. Martin’s Press)

Outstanding Literary Work – Debut Author

“Heads of the Colored People: Stories” – Nafissa Thompson-Spires (37 Ink, A Division of Atria Books)

“Lighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement” – Janet Dewart Bell (The New Press)

“Lucile H. Bluford and the Kansas City Call: Activist Voice for Social Justice” – Dr. Sheila D. Brooks (Author), Clinton C. Wilson II (Author), (Rowman & Littlefield)

“Small Country: A Novel” – Gaël Faye (Hogarth)

“Us Against the World: Our Secrets to Love, Marriage, and Family” – David Mann (Author), Tamela Mann (Author), Shaun Saunders (With), (W Publishing)*

Outstanding Literary Work – Biography/Autobiography

“Barracoon” – Zora Neale Hurston (Amistad HarperCollins Publishers)

“Becoming” – Michelle Obama (Crown)*

“The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke” – Jeffrey C. Stewart (Oxford University Press)

“The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela” – Nelson Mandela (Author), Sahm Venter (Editor) (Liveright Publishing)

“Well, That Escalated Quickly: Memoirs and Mistakes of an Accidental Activist” – Franchesa Ramsey (Grand Central Publishing)

Outstanding Literary Work – Instructional

“Carla Hall’s Soul Food: Everyday and Celebration” – Carla Hall (Author) Genevive Ko (With) (Harper Wave)

“For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics” – Donna Brazile (Author), Yolanda Caraway (Author), Leah Daughtry (Author), Minyon Moore (Author), Veronica Chambers (With), (St. Martin’s Press)

“Poised for Excellence: Fundamental Principles of Effective Leadership in the Boardroom and Beyond” – Karima Mariam-Arthur (Palgrave Macmillan)

“Rise and Grind: Outperform, Outwork, and Outhustle Your Way to a More Successful and Rewarding Life” – Daymond John (Author), Daniel Paisner (With), (Currency)*

“Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves” – Glory Edim (Ballantine Books)

Outstanding Literary Work – Poetry

“Confessions of a Barefaced Woman” – Allison Elaine Joseph (Red Hen Press)
“Ghost, Like a Place” – Iain Haley Pollock (Alice James Books)
“Refuse” – Julian Randall (University of Pittsburgh Press)
“Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart” – Alice Walker (Author) (37 Ink/Atria Books)*
“The Gospel According to Wild Indigo” – Cyrus Cassells (Crab Orchard Review & Southern Illinois University Press)

Outstanding Literary Work – Children

Facing Frederick: The Life of Frederick Douglass, A Monumental American Man – Tonya Bolden (Abrams For Young Readers)
Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race – Margot Lee Shetterly (Author), Laura Freeman (Illustrator), (Harper)*
I Can Be Anything! Don’t Tell Me I Can’t – Diane Dillon (The Blue Sky Press)
The 5 O’Clock Band – Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews (Author), Bryan Collier (Illustrator), (Abrams For Young Readers)
The Word Collector – Peter H. Reynolds (Orchard Books)

Outstanding Literary Work – Youth/Teens

“A Very Large Expanse of Sea” – Tahereh Mafi (Harper)
“Chasing King’s Killer: The Hunt for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Assassin” – James L. Swanson (Scholastic Press)
“Harbor Me” – Jacqueline Woodson (Nancy M. Paulsen)*
“The Journey of Little Charlie” – Christopher Paul Curtis (Scholastic Press)
“We Are Not Yet Equal: Understanding our Racial Divide” – Carol Anderson (Author), Tonya Bolden (With), (Bloomsbury YA)

2019 Academy Awards: ‘Green Book’ wins three Oscars, including Best Picture

February 24, 2019

by Carla Hay

 

"Green Book
Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen in “Green Book” (Photo by Patti Perret)

Universal Pictures’ “Green Book” won three Oscars, including Best Picture, at the 91st Academy Awards, which took place at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on February 24, 2019.  Meanwhile, Netflix’s Spanish-language film “Roma,”  which went into the ceremony tied with the most nominations (10), won four Oscars. There was no host for the show, following the controversy over Kevin Hart quitting the job over his past homophobic remarks, as well as disagreements over his public apologies for those remarks. ABC had the U.S. telecast of the Academy Awards ceremony, which is presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

“Green Book” is inspired by the true story of a friendship that develops between Italian-American driver Tony “Lip” Vallelonga and African-American pianist Don Shirley during a early 1960s road trip in the segregated South. “Green Book” also won Oscars for Best Supporting Actor (Marhershala Ali, who plays Shirley) and Best Original Screenplay, which was co-written by Nick Vallelonga (one of Tony Vallelonga’s sons) and director Peter Farrelly. “Green Book” is one of the few movies that has won the Oscar for Best Picture without its director getting a Best Director nomination.

“Roma” is inspired by filmmaker Alfonso Cuarón’s childhood in early 1970s Mexico, as seen through the perspective of his family’s nanny/housekeeper. “Roma” won the Oscars for Best Director, Best Cinematography and Best Foreign Language Film.  Cuarón was a winner of all three of these Oscars, since he is the director and cinematographer of “Roma,” as well as one of the film’s producers.

The official Queen biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody” won four Oscars: Best Actor (for Rami Malek), Best Film Editing, Best Sound Editing and Sound Mixing. 20th Century Fox’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” was nominated for five Oscars, including Best Picture.

Fox Searchlight’s “The Favourite,” which had 10 nominations going into the ceremony, won one award that came as a surprise to many: Best Actress, for Olivia Colman, who triumphed over widely predicted Glenn Close of “The Wife,” who had been winning several major prizes in this category at other major award shows. “The Favourite,” set in the early 1700s, tells the story of Great Britain’s Queen Anne and two women who compete for her affections. Meanwhile, Regina King of “If Beale Street Could Talk” won for Best Supporting Actress.

Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” won three out its seven Oscar nominations: Best Original Score, Best Costume Design and Best Production Design. “Black Panther” now holds the record as the superhero movie with the most Oscars.

Presenters at the 2019 Academy Awards were Awkwafina, Daniel Craig, Chris Evans, Tina Fey, Jennifer Lopez, Amy Poehler, Maya Rudolph, Amandla Stenberg, Tessa Thompson Constance Wu, Javier Bardem, Angela Bassett, Chadwick Boseman, Emilia Clarke, Laura Dern, Samuel L. Jackson, Stephan James, Keegan-Michael Key, KiKi Layne, James McAvoy, Melissa McCarthy, Jason Momoa, Sarah Paulson, Gary Oldman, Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell, Allison Janney, Elsie Fisher, Danai Gurira, Brian Tyree Henry, Michael B. Jordan, Michael Keaton, Helen Mirren, John Mulaney, Tyler Perry, Pharrell Williams, Krysten Ritter, Paul Rudd, Michelle Yeoh, José Andrés, Dana Carvey, Queen Latifah, Congressman John Lewis, Diego Luna, Tom Morello, Mike Myers, Trevor Noah, Amandla Stenberg, Barbra Streisand and Serena Williams.

Queen with singer Adam Lambert opened the show with a medley of Queen’s “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions.” Other musical performances were for four of the five Oscar-nominated songs. Bette Midler sang “The Place Where Los Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns.” Jennifer Hudson performed “I’ll Fight” from “RBG.” David Rawlings and Gillian Welch performed “When a Cowboy Trades His Spurs for Wings” from “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.” Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper duetted on “Shallow” from “A Star Is Born,” which won the Oscar for Best Original Song. “All the Stars” from “Black Panther” was not performed since the song’s artists Kendrick Lamar and SZA declined to perform the song.

Donna Gigliotti (who won an Oscar for Best Picture for 1998’s “Shakespeare in Love) and Emmy-winning director Glenn Weiss were the producers of the 2019 Academy Awards. This was the first time that Gigliotti is producing the Oscar ceremony. Weiss has directed several major award shows, including the Oscars and the Tonys.

Diversity and Historic Wins

Rami Malek, Olivia Colman, Regina King and Mahershala Ali at the 91st Academy Awards at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on February 24, 2019. (Photo by Rick Rowell/ABC)

It was a historic Oscar ceremony for diversity, since it was a record-breaking Oscar ceremony, with the highest number so far (14) of non-whites winning Oscars in one year. Malek became the first Egyptian-American to win an Oscar for Best Actor. Ali of “Green Book” and Regina King of “If Beale Street Could Talk” joined the growing list of black actors who have won Oscars. “BlacKkKlansman” screenplay co-writer Spike Lee won his first Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. (Lee  also received an honorary Oscar, a non-competitive prize, in 2015.) Black filmmakers won in the categories for Best Adapted Screenplay (Lee and Kevin Willmott); Best Animated Feature (“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” co-director Peter Ramsey); Best Production Design (Hannah Beachler of “Black Panther”); and Best Costume Design (Ruth Carter of “Black Panther”). It was the first time that black people have won Oscars for Best Animated Feature, Best Costume Design and Best Production Design.

Asian filmmakers also had several Oscar wins: “Free Solo” directors/producers Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyil won for Best Documentary Feature; “Bao” director Domee Shi won for Best Animated Short; and “Period. End of Sentence.” director/producer Rayka Zehtabchi won for Best Live-Action Short. “Roma” was the movie that gave Latinos the most representation at this year’s Academy Awards, with wins for Cuarón and producer Gabriela Rodríguez.

The number of female Oscar winners increased considerably in 2019, compared to 2018. In 2019, there were 15 female winners and 36 male winners, compared to 2018, when there were only six female winners and 24 male winners.

In addition, this was the first time in Oscar history that three of the four acting prizes went to LGBTQ character roles, and these characters also happened to be based on real people: Queen lead singer Freddie Mercury of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” Queen Anne of “The Favourite” and pianist Shirley of “Green Book.”

Here is the complete list of winners and nominations for the 2019 Academy Awards:

*=winner

Best Picture

Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen in “Green Book” (Photo by Patti Perret)

“Black Panther”
(Producer: Kevin Feige)

“BlacKkKlansman”
(Producers: Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Raymond Mansfield, Jordan Peele and Spike Lee)

“Bohemian Rhapsody”
(Producer: Graham King)

“The Favourite”
(Producers: Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday and Yorgos Lanthimos)

“Green Book”*
(Producers: Jim Burke, Charles B. Wessler, Brian Currie, Peter Farrelly and Nick Vallelonga)

“Roma”
(Producers: Gabriela Rodríguez and Alfonso Cuarón)

“A Star Is Born”
(Producers: Bill Gerber, Bradley Cooper and Lynette Howell Taylor)

“Vice”
(Producers: Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Adam McKay and Kevin Messick)

Best Actor

Rami Malek and Gwilym Lee in “Bohemian Rhapsody” (Photo by Alex Bailey)

Christian Bale, “Vice”
Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
Willem Dafoe, “At Eternity’s Gate”
Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”*
Viggo Mortensen, “Green Book”

Best Actress

Olivia Colman in “The Favourite” (Photo by Atsushi Nishijima)

Yalitza Aparicio, “Roma”
Glenn Close, “The Wife”
Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”*
Lady Gaga, “A Star Is Born”
Melissa McCarthy, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Best Supporting Actor

Mahershala Ali in “Green Book” (Photo courtesy of Universal Pictures and Participant Media)

Mahershala Ali, “Green Book”*
Adam Driver, “BlacKkKlansman”
Sam Elliott, “A Star Is Born”
Richard E. Grant, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Sam Rockwell, “Vice”

Best Supporting Actress

Regina King in “If Beale Street Could Talk” (Photo by Tatum Mangus)

Amy Adams, “Vice”
Marina de Tavira, “Roma”
Regina King, “If Beale Street Could Talk”*
Emma Stone, “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”

Best Director

Alfonso Cuarón and Yalitza Aparicio on the set of “Roma” (Photo by Carlos Somonte/Netflix)

Spike Lee, “BlacKkKlansman”
Paweł Pawlikowski, “Cold War”
Yorgos Lanthimos, “The Favourite”
Alfonso Cuarón, “Roma”*
Adam McKay, “Vice”

Best Animated Feature

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” (Image courtesy of Sony Pictures Animation)

“Incredibles 2,” directed by Brad Bird; produced by John Walker and Nicole Paradis Grindle

“Isle of Dogs,” directed and produced by Wes Anderson; produced by Scott Rudin, Steven Rales and Jeremy Dawson

“Mirai,” directed by Mamoru Hosoda; produced by Yuichiro Saito

“Ralph Breaks the Internet,” directed by Rich Moore and Phil Johnston; produced by Clark Spencer

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” directed by Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman; produced by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller*

Best Animated Short

“Animal Behaviour,” directed and produced by Alison Snowden and David Fine
“Bao,” directed by Domee Shi; produced by Becky Neiman-Cobb*
“Late Afternoon,” directed by Louise Bagnall; produced by Nuria González Blanco
“One Small Step,” directed by Andrew Chesworth and Bobby Pontillas
“Weekends,” directed and produced by Trevor Jimenez

Best Adapted Screenplay

Spike Lee and Adam Driver on the set of “BlacKkKlansman” (Photo by David Lee/ Focus Features)

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
“BlacKkKlansman,” Charlie Wachtel, David Rabinowitz, Kevin Willmott and Spike Lee*
“Can You Ever Forgive Me?,” Nicole Holofcener and Jeff Whitty
“If Beale Street Could Talk,” Barry Jenkins
“A Star Is Born,” Eric Roth, Bradley Cooper and Will Fetters

Best Original Screenplay

Viggo Mortensen, writer/director/producer Peter Farrelly and Mahershala Ali on the set of “Green Book” (Photo by Patti Perret)

“The Favourite,” Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara
“First Reformed,” Paul Schrader
“Green Book,” Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie and Peter Farrelly*
“Roma,” Alfonso Cuarón
“Vice,” Adam McKay

Best Cinematography

Marco Graf, Daniela Demesa, Yalitza Aparicio, Marina De Tavira, Diego Cortina Autrey and Carlos Peralta Jacobson in “Roma” (Photo by Carlos Somonte)

“Cold War,” Łukasz Żal
“The Favourite,” Robbie Ryan
“Never Look Away,” Caleb Deschanel
“Roma,” Alfonso Cuarón*
“A Star Is Born,” Matthew Libatique

Best Documentary Feature

Alex Honnold in “Free Solo” (Photo courtesy of National Geographic)

“Free Solo,” directed and produced by Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyil; produced by Evan Hayes and Shannon Dill*

“Hale County This Morning, This Evening,” directed and produced by RaMell Ross; produced by Joslyn Barnes and Su Kim

“Minding the Gap,” directed and produced by Bing Liu; produced by Diane Quon

“Of Fathers and Sons,” directed by Talal Derki; produced by Ansgar Frerich, Eva Kemme and Tobias N. Siebert

“RBG,” directed and produced by Betsy West and Julie Cohen

Best Documentary Short Subject

“Black Sheep,” directed by Ed Perkins; produced by Jonathan Chinn
“End Game,” directed and produced by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman
“Lifeboat,” directed and produced by Skye Fitzgerald
“A Night at the Garden,” directed and produced by Marshall Curry
“Period. End of Sentence.,” directed and produced by Rayka Zehtabchi*

Best Live Action Short Film

“Detainment,” directed and produced by Vincent Lambe; produced by Darren Mahon
“Fauve,” directed by Jeremy Comte; produced by Maria Gracia Turgeon
“Marguerite,” directed by Marianne Farley; produced by Marie-Hélène Panisset
“Mother,” directed by Rodrigo Sorogoyen; produced by María del Puy Alvarado
“Skin,” directed and produced by Guy Nattiv; produced by Jaime Ray Newman*

Best Foreign Language Film

Yalitza Aparicio, Marco Graf, Carlos Peralta Jacobson and Daniela Demesa in “Roma” (Photo by Alfonso Cuarón)

“Capernaum” (Lebanon)
“Cold War” (Poland)
“Never Look Away” (Germany)
“Roma” (Mexico)*
“Shoplifters” (Japan)

Best Film Editing

Gwilym Lee, Ben Hardy, Rami Malek and Joe Mazzello in “Bohemian Rhapsody” (Photo courtesy of 20th Century Fox)

“BlacKkKlansman,” Barry Alexander Brown
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” John Ottman*
“Green Book,” Patrick J. Don Vito
“The Favourite,” Yorgos Mavropsaridis
“Vice,” Hank Corwin

Best Sound Editing

Gwilym Lee, Rami Malek and Joe Mazzello in “Bohemian Rhapsody” (Photo courtesy 20th Century Fox)

“Black Panther,” Benjamin A. Burtt and Steve Boeddeker
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” John Warhurst*
“First Man,” Ai-Ling Lee and Mildred Iatrou Morgan
“A Quiet Place,” Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl
“Roma,” Sergio Diaz and Skip Lievsay

Best Sound Mixing

Joe Mazzello, Ben Hardy, Rami Malek and Gwilym Lee in “Bohemian Rhapsody” (Photo by Alex Bailey)

“Black Panther,” Steve Boeddeker, Brandon Proctor and Peter Devlin
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” Paul Massey, Tim Cavagin and John Casali*
“First Man,” Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño, Ai-Ling Lee and Mary H. Ellis
“Roma,” Skip Lievsay, Craig Henighan and José Antonio García
“A Star Is Born,” Tom Ozanich, Dean Zupancic, Jason Ruder and Steve Morrow

Best Production Design

Michael B. Jordan and Daniel Kaluuya in “Black Panther” (Photo courtesy of Disney/Marvel Studios)

“Black Panther”*
Production Design: Hannah Beachler; Set Decoration: Jay Hart

“The Favourite”
Production Design: Fiona Crombie; Set Decoration: Alice Felton

“First Man”
Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Kathy Lucas

“Mary Poppins Returns”
Production Design: John Myhre; Set Decoration: Gordon Sim

“Roma”
Production Design: Eugenio Caballero; Set Decoration: Bárbara Enríquez

Best Original Score

Lupita Nyong’o and Chadwick Boseman in “Black Panther” (Photo courtesy of Disney/Marvel Studios)

“BlacKkKlansman,” Terence Blanchard
“Black Panther,” Ludwig Goransson*
“If Beale Street Could Talk,” Nicholas Britell
“Isle of Dogs,” Alexandre Desplat
“Mary Poppins Returns,” Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman

Best Original Song

Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper in “A Star Is Born” (Photo by Clay Enos)

“All the Stars” from “Black Panther,” song written by Kendrick Lamar, Solana Rowe (SZA), Mark Spears and Anthony Tiffith

“I’ll Fight” from “RBG,” song written by Diane Warren

“The Place Where Lost Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns,” song written by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman

“Shallow” from “A Star Is Born,” song written by Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando, Andrew Wyatt and Benjamin Rice*

“When A Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings” from “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” song written by David Rawlings and Gillian Welch

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

Amy Adams and Christian Bale in “Vice” (Photo by Matt Kennedy)

“Border,” Göran Lundström and Pamela Goldammer
“Mary Queen of Scots,” Jenny Shircore, Marc Pilcher and Jessica Brooks
“Vice,” Greg Cannom, Kate Biscoe and Patricia DeHaney*

Best Costume Design

Lupita Nyong’o and Letitia Wright in “Black Panther” (Photo by Matt Kennedy)

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” Mary Zophres
“Black Panther,” Ruth E. Carter*
“The Favourite,” Sandy Powell
“Mary Poppins Returns,” Sandy Powell
“Mary Queen of Scots,” Alexandra Byrne

Best Visual Effects

Ryan Gosling in “First Man”  (Photo courtesy of Universal Pictures and DreamWorks Pictures)

“Avengers: Infinity War,” Dan DeLeeuw, Kelly Port, Russell Earl and Dan Sudick

“Christopher Robin,” Christopher Lawrence, Michael Eames, Theo Jones and Chris Corbould

“First Man,” Paul Lambert, Ian Hunter, Tristan Myles and J.D. Schwalm*

“Ready Player One,” Roger Guyett, Grady Cofer, Matthew E. Butler and David Shirk

“Solo: A Star Wars Story,” Rob Bredow, Patrick Tubach, Neal Scanlan and Dominic Tuohy

2019 Screen Actors Guild Awards: ‘Black Panther,’ ‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ win top prizes

January 27, 2019

by Carla Hay

Scree Actors Guild Awards

 

With three prizes, the comedy series “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” was the top winner at the 25th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards, which were presented at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles on January 27, 2019. TNT and TBS had the U.S. telecast of the show, which was hosted by Megan Mullally. “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” received the SAG Awards for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series, while Rachel Brosnahan was award the prize for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series, and Tony Shalhoub won the award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series.

Meanwhile, the superhero movie “Black Panther” won two SAG Awards: Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture and Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture.

Rami Malek of “Bohemian Rhapsody” won the SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role, while Glenn Close of “The Wife” received the SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role. Malek and Close also won Golden Globes for their leading performances in these dramatic films.

Several of the other actors who won prizes at the 2019 Golden Globe Awards repeated their wins at the 2019 SAG Awards. They included Mahershala Ali of “Green Book” (Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role); Sandra Oh of “Killing Eve” (Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series); Darren Criss of “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries); and Patricia Arquette of “Escape at Dannemora” (Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries).

For the second year in a row, “This Is Us” won the SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Drama Series. Emily Blunt of the horror movie “A Quiet Place” received the SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role.

“A Star Is Born,” which went into the ceremony with the most nominations (four) out of all the nominated movies, was ultimately shut out and didn’t win any SAG Awards. Also passed over in the movie categories, despite having multiple nominations, were “BlacKkKlansman,” “The Favourite” and “Vice.” Shutouts in the TV category were “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “The Kominsky Method,” “Barry,””Grace and Frankie” and “Sharp Objects,” which each had multiple nominations at the 2019 SAG Awards.

Eligible movies were those that were newly released in U.S. theaters in 2018, while eligible TV shows were those which had new episodes that were televised in prime-time on U.S. networks in 2018. The Screen Actors Guild votes for the awards. Emmy-winning actor Alan Alda received the SAG Life Achievement Award at the 2019 ceremony.

Here is the complete list of winners and nominees for the 2018 Screen Actors Guild Awards:

*=winner

MOVIES

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
“A Star Is Born”
“Black Panther”*
“BlacKkKlansman”
“Bohemian Rhapsody”
“Crazy Rich Asians”

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
Christian Bale, “Vice”
Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”*
Viggo Mortensen, “Green Book”
John David Washington, “BlacKkKlansman”

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Emily Blunt, “Mary Poppins Returns”
Glenn Close, “The Wife”*
Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”
Lady Gaga, “A Star Is Born”
Melissa McCarthy, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
Mahershala Ali, “Green Book”*
Timothée Chalamet, “Beautiful Boy”
Adam Driver, “BlacKkKlansman”
Sam Elliott, “A Star Is Born”
Richard E. Grant, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Amy Adams, “Vice”
Emily Blunt, “A Quiet Place”*
Margot Robbie, “Mary Queen of Scots”
Emma Stone, “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture
“Ant-Man and the Wasp”
“Avengers: Infinity War”
“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs”
“Black Panther”*
“Mission: Impossible – Fallout”

TELEVISION

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series
“The Americans”
“Better Call Saul”
“The Handmaid’s Tale”
“Ozark”
“This Is Us”*

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
Jason Bateman, “Ozark”*
Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”
Joseph Fiennes, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
John Krasinski, “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan”
Bob Odenkirk, “Better Call Saul”

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series
Julia Garner, “Ozark”
Laura Linney, “Ozark”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Sandra Oh, “Killing Eve”*
Robin Wright, “House of Cards”

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
“Atlanta”
“Barry”
“GLOW”
“The Kominsky Method”
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”*

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
Alan Arkin, “The Kominsky Method”
Michael Douglas, “The Kominsky Method”
Bill Hader, “Barry”
Tony Shalhoub, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”*
Henry Winkler, “Barry”

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
Alex Borstein, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Alison Brie, “GLOW”
Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”*
Jane Fonda, “Grace and Frankie”
Lily Tomlin, “Grace and Frankie”

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Antonio Banderas, “Genius: Picasso”
Darren Criss, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”*
Hugh Grant, “A Very English Scandal”
Anthony Hopkins, “King Lear”
Bill Pullman, “The Sinner” 

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
Amy Adams, “Sharp Objects”
Patricia Arquette, “Escape at Dannemora”*
Patricia Clarkson, “Sharp Objects”
Penélope Cruz, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Emma Stone, “Maniac”

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Comedy or Drama Series
“GLOW”*

“Marvel’s Daredevil”
“Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan”
“The Walking Dead”
“Westworld”

2019 Academy Awards: ‘Roma’ and ‘The Favourite’ are the top nominees

January 22, 2019

by Carla Hay

Yalitza Aparicio in "Roma"
Yalitza Aparicio in “Roma” (Photo by Alfonso Cuarón)

Rachel Weisz and Olivia Colman in “The Favourite” (Photo by Yorgos Lanthimos)

With 10 nominations each, including Best Picture, the Spanish-language drama “Roma” and the British dark comedy “The Favourite” are the leading nominees for the 91st Academy Awards, which will take place at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on February 24, 2019. There is no host for the show, following the controversy over Kevin Hart quitting the job over his past homophobic remarks, as well as disagreements over his public apologies for those remarks. ABC will have the U.S. telecast of the Academy Awards ceremony, which is presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Actor/screenwriter Kumail Nanjiani and actress Tracee Ellis Ross announced the nominations on January 22 at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California.

Netflix’s “Roma” is inspired by filmmaker Alfonso Cuarón’s childhood in early 1970s Mexico, as seen through the perspective of his family’s nanny/housekeeper. Fox Searchlight’s “The Favourite,” set in the early 1700s, tells the story of Great Britain’s Queen Anne and two women who compete for her affections.

As of 2010, the Academy can nominate up to 10 movies for Best Picture. This year, there are only eight movies that made the list: In addition to “Roma” and “The Favourite,” the other Best Picture contenders are “BlacKkKlansman,” “Black Panther,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Green Book,” “A Star Is Born” and “Vice.” Of those contenders, “A Star is Born” and “Vice” have eight nominations each; “Black Panther” scored seven nods; “BlacKkKlansman” has six nominations; and “Green Book” and “Bohemian Rhapsody” received five nods each.

In the categories for actors, actresses and directors, most of the contenders are those who have been the same nominees or winners at other award shows leading up to the Oscars. However, there were some nominations that were not widely predicted.

Snubs and Surprises

Bradley Cooper (pictured at left) on the set of “A Star Is Born” (Photo by Clay Enos)

The Oscars can always be counted on to have some nominations that are very different from the other major movie awards. The biggest snub was Bradley Cooper of “A Star Is Born” being shut out of the Best Director category, even though he was nominated for that prize at just about every other award show where movies from major studios are eligible. (Cooper’s 2018 remake of “A Star Is Born” was released by Warner Bros. Pictures.) Cooper, who made his directorial debut with “A Star Is Born,” still received three Oscar nominations for the movie: Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Adapted Screenplay. (He’s also one of the movie’s producers and screenwriters.)

The biggest surprises were the nominations for the two main actresses from “Roma”: Yalitza Aparicio (for Best Actress) and Marina de Tavira (for Best Supporting Actress). Aparicio, who made her film debut in “Roma,” got very little recognition on the awards circuit leading up to the Oscars: She picked up a Critics’ Choice nomination and won a Hollywood Film Award for her role in the movie, but she was passed over for nominations at just about all the other movie award shows. Meanwhile, de Tavira was completely shut out of being nominated at all other major U.S.-based movie award shows until the Oscars.

Another big surprise was Paweł Pawlikowski getting a Best Director nomination for his Polish-language “Cold War,” which is, just like “Roma,” a period movie filmed in black-and-white in a non-English language and distributed by a streaming service. (Amazon is distributing “Cold War.”) Pawlikowski’s nomination for Best Director was also unusual because it’s rare for someone to get an Oscar nomination for Best Director for a movie that is not nominated for Best Picture. In addition to Pawlikowski, the other Best Director nominees are Spike Lee for “BlacKkKlansman”; Yorgos Lanthimos for “The Favourite”; Alfonso Cuarón for “Roma”; and Adam McKay for “Vice.” “Cold War” had been widely predicted to get Oscar nominations for Best Foreign-Language Film and Best Cinematography, and the movie did get those nods, but it’s got stiff competition from “Roma” in all of those categories.

Amazon Studios’ robust awards campaign for Timothée Chalamet and his supporting role in the drug-addiction drama “Beautiful Boy” seemed to be paying off, since he was getting nominated at several award shows, but Chalamet and “Beautiful Boy” were ultimately shut out of the Oscar race. And so was another buzzworthy “based on a true story” drama about a troubled teenage son: Focus Features’ “Boy Erased,” starring Lucas Hedges, Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe as a family affected by the controversial practices of gay-conversion therapy.

Ethan Hawke in “First Reformed” (Photo courtesy of A24)

Ethan Hawke won the majority of critics’ awards for Best Actor for his role in A24’s “First Reformed,” but he was shut out of the Oscar race for the movie. Although he was a critics’ darling, Hawke did very little awards campaigning for the movie, which probably hurt his chances of being nominated for an Oscar. (He was also snubbed this year by the Screen Actors Guild Awards and Golden Globe Awards.) Instead, the only Oscar nomination for writer/director Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed” was Best Original Screenplay.

Horror movies are typically overlooked by the Academy Awards (2017’s “Get Out” was one of the few exceptions), and this year continued that snubbing pattern, with critically acclaimed “A Quiet Place”from Paramount Pictures getting just one nomination (Best Sound Editing) and A24’s “Hereditary” (which had its share of passionate fans and detractors) getting completely shut out of the race.

It hasn’t been a good Oscar year for independent film distributor A24, which previously scored Oscar gold for 2016’s “Moonlight,” winner of the prizes for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor. A24 lost some of its Oscar momentum for its movies released in 2017: “Lady Bird” received five Oscar nominations but no Oscar wins, while the Oscar campaign for “The Disaster Artist” imploded when the movie’s star/director James Franco was accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women during the final week of Oscar nomination voting. Franco was snubbed by the Academy for “The Disaster Artist,” and the movie ended up with only one Oscar nomination:  Best Adapted Screenplay, for writers Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber. This year, A24’s “Hereditary” and the critically acclaimed teen comedy “Eighth Grade” were completely shut out for Oscar nominations, while A24’s only Oscar nod for a 2018 movie was for the previously mentioned Best Original Screenplay nomination for “First Reformed.”

As streaming services such as Netflix, Amazon and Hulu continue to increase their clout in the movie industry, traditional independent studios are struggling to keep up with getting hit movies and major awards. A24 isn’t the only independent studio whose awards influence has faded for movies released in 2018. Neon hit a home run in its first year in business with 2017’s “I, Tonya,” which scooped up several major awards (including an Oscar) for Allison Janney’s supporting performance. However, Neon’s 2018 movies have mostly been passed over for winning awards: The Natalie Portman music-oriented drama “Vox Lux” and the documentary “Three Identical Strangers” were Neon’s biggest awards hopefuls of the year, but those two films have been completely shut out of Oscar nominations. Neon’s only Oscar nod for a 2018 film is Best Makeup and Hairstyling for the troll movie “Border,” which has tough competition with category frontrunner “Vice.”

Emily Blunt in “Mary Poppins Returns” (Photo by Jay Maidment/Disney Enterprises, Inc.)

Disney’s musical sequel “Mary Poppins Returns” didn’t get Oscar nominations for Best Picture, lead actress Emily Blunt and supporting actor Lin-Manuel Miranda, but the movie got expected nominations for Best Production Design, Best Costume Design, Best Original Score and Best Original Song.

Universal Pictures’ “First Man,” which depicts astronaut Neil Armstrong’s journey to being the first man on the moon, started out strong after getting rave reviews at the 2018 Venice Film Festival, but Oscar buzz for “First Man” (starring Ryan Gosling as Armstrong) considerably faded after the movie fizzled at the box office and got snubbed in most of the major categories at several award shows. Best Original Score was the only category for which “First Man” was winning the most awards leading up to the Oscars. The prizes for “First Man” composer Justin Hurwitz included a Golden Globe and Critics’ Choice Award. Therefore, it was surprising that he didn’t get an Oscar nomination in this category. “First Man” did receive four Oscar nods, but only in technical categories: Best Production Design, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing and Best Visual Effects. “First Man” was director Damien Chazelle’s follow-up to his award-winning hit “La La Land” (which won six Oscars, including Best Director), so “First Man” getting snubbed in the biggest Oscar categories is a big step down for Chazelle.

Focus Features’ “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?,” the Fred Rogers biography directed by Morgan Neville, was widely predicted as the frontrunner for Best Documentary Feature because the movie had been winning most of the documentary awards up until this point, but the movie failed to get an Oscar nomination. Instead, “Of Fathers and Sons,” a movie about a radical Islamist family, received a surprise Oscar nomination, after being passed over for nominations at every other major award show that gives prizes to documentary feature films. So why the Oscar snub for “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” The Academy tends to reward documentaries that have a great deal of original footage (in other words, not relying too heavily on archived footage), and the Academy voters prefer investigative documentaries that uncover a lot of information that was not widely known to the general public. “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” was undoubtedly a feel-good popular movie, but perhaps Academy voters considered it to be too much of a safe and conventional documentary where the filmmakers didn’t challenge themselves enough, beyond collecting archived footage and getting authorized interviews with Rogers’ family and colleagues.

Despite all the hoopla over the romantic comedy “Crazy Rich Asians,” the movie was completely shut out of the Oscar race. Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Crazy Rich Asians,” which was a big international hit, was the first major Hollywood studio movie to have an all-Asian cast since 1993’s “The Joy Luck Club.” “Crazy Rich Asians” got mostly positive reviews from critics, but the movie’s formulaic plot with over-used clichés seem to have severely hurt its chances of being taken seriously by Oscar voters.

In other categories, surprises included the German film “Never Look Away” (distributed in the U.S. by Sony Pictures Classics) getting nominations for Best Foreign-Language Film and Best Cinematography after being passed over for those nominations at almost all of the other movie award shows. The Academy rewarded “Never Look Away” with Oscar nominations, but snubbed South Korea’s “Burning” for Best Foreign-Language Film and “Black Panther” for Best Cinematography, even though “Burning” and “Black Panther” scored those nominations at several other award shows.

Diversity Issues

Lupita Nyong’o, Chadwick Boseman and Danai Gurira in “Black Panther” (Photo courtesy of Disney/Marvel Studios)

Ever since the #OscarsSoWhite backlash of 2015 and 2016, the Academy has been under intense scrutiny over diversity issues when it comes to race and gender. (Most of the Academy members and Oscar nominees are white males.) The Academy has made public efforts to invite more women and people of color into its membership in recent years. There has been a little more diversity, in terms of who gets nominated for Oscars, but there is still a long way to go for most of the behind-the-scenes technical categories, such as editing, visual effects, original score and cinematography. The good news for Oscar diversity in 2019 is that there is at least one person of color nominated in each of the four acting categories. In addition, several women and people of color are nominated in the category of Best Picture, an award that goes to a film’s producer(s). They are Jordan Peele and Spike Lee (African-American males) for “BlacKkKlansman”; and Ceci Dempsey and Lee Magiday (white females) for “The Favourite”; Gabriela Rodríguez and Alfonso Cuarón (Latinos) for “Roma”; Lynette Howell Taylor (white female) for “A Star Is Born”; and Dede Gardner (white female) for “Vice.”

In other gender-neutral Oscar categories, women did not make much progress, compared to the 2018 Academy Awards. In 2019, there were no women nominated in the Oscar categories of Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing and Best Original Score. (In 2018, the categories of Best Director, Best Cinematography and Best Film Editing each had one female nominee, while Best Original Score continued to have only male nominees.) And in the categories of Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay, only one woman was nominated in each category in 2019, and they share the nomination with a man.

The categories for Best Costume Design and Best Makeup and Hairstyling have traditionally been dominated by women. All of this year’s nominees for Best Costume Design are female, while women are 62.5 percent of this year’s Best Makeup and Hairstyling nominees. The gender-neutral categories that have the most gender parity this year are Best Production Design, Best Original Song and Best Documentary Feature, where women are almost half of the nominees in each category.

Hannah Beachler of “Black Panther” became the first African-American to get an Oscar nomination for Best Production Design. African-Americans earned other rare nominations in categories that are typically dominated by white/Caucasian filmmakers: “BlacKkKlansman” had the most nominations this year for black filmmakers: Spike Lee earned three nods as a director, producer and screenwriter, while producer Jordan Peele, screenwriter Kevin Willmott and composer Terence Blanchard were also nominated for the movie. “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” co-director Peter Ramsey is among the nominees for Best Animated Feature; costume designer Ruth E. Carter is a contender for “Black Panther”; and Barry Jenkins of “If Beale Street Could Talk” is up for Best Adapted Screenplay, an Oscar that he won for 2016’s “Moonlight,” making him only the third black person to win an Oscar in that category. Other black Oscar nominees this year are Kendrick Lamar, Solana Rowe (also known as SZA), Mark Spears and Anthony Tiffith, who all co-wrote Best Original Song nominee “All the Stars” from “Black Panther.”

“Roma” was the movie that gave Latinos the most representation at this year’s Academy Awards, and “Roma” is expected to win multiple Oscars. In addition to Cuarón and actresses Aparicio and de Tavira, other “Roma” Oscar nominees are producer Gabriela Rodríguez (Best Picture and Best Foreign Language Film); Sergio Diaz (Best Sound Editing); José Antonio García (Best Sound Mixing);and Eugenio Caballero and Bárbara Enríquez (Best Production Design), It’s also worth noting that three Mexican directors (Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñárritu and Guillermo del Toro) have won several of the Best Director awards in the 2010s decade. Cuarón, who is the frontrunner to win for “Roma,” previously won the Best Director prize for 2013’s “Gravity”; Iñárritu won for 2014’s “Birdman” and 2015’s “The Revenant”‘; and del Toro won for 2017’s “The Shape of Water.”

Even though “Crazy Rich Asians” didn’t get any Oscar nominations, that doesn’t mean that Asians were completely snubbed by the Academy this year. Asians who received Oscar nominations include cinematographer Matthew Libatique for “A Star Is Born”; director Mamoru Hosoda and producer Yuichiro Saito for the animated film “Mirai”; director Hirokazu Kore-eda, who scored a Best Foreign-Language Film nod for Japan’s “Shoplifters”; and director Bobby Pontillas, who earned a Best Animated Short nomination for  co-directing “One Small Step.” The category of Best Documentary Feature had the highest Asian representation, with directors/producers Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi for “Free Solo”; director/producer Bing Liu and producer Diane Quon for “Minding the Gap”; director Talal Derki (who is of Syrian/Middle Eastern descent) for “Of Fathers and Sons”; and producer Su Kim for “Hale County This Morning, This Evening.”

Notable Milestones

Alfonso Cuarón and Yalitza Aparicio on the set of “Roma” (Photo by Carlos Somonte/Netflix)

The 2019 Oscar race has several milestones. “Roma” is the first Netflix movie to get an Oscar nomination for Best Picture, although it’s not the first streaming service to score a nomination in that category. That milestone was achieved by Amazon’s 2016 drama “Manchester by the Sea,” which went on to win Best Actor (for Casey Affleck) and Best Original Screenplay (for Kenneth Lonergan).  Netflix won its first Oscar for the 2017 documentary feature film “Icarus.” If “Roma” wins Best Picture, it will be not only be the first movie from a streaming service to win Best Picture at the Oscars, but also the first non-English-language movie to win the prize.

As widely predicted, Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther” was nominated for Best Picture, making it the first superhero movie to be nominated in this Oscar category. However, with no Oscar nominations in the categories for acting, directing or screenplay, “Black Panther” is a long shot to win Best Picture. The other Oscar nominations for “Black Panther” are for Best Costume Design, Best Production Design, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing, Best Original Score and Best Original Song.

“BlacKkKlansman” filmmaker Spike Lee, who has been making critically acclaimed movies since the 1980s, received his first Oscar nomination for Best Director, after being passed over in that category for decades. Lee, who is one of the producers and screenwriters of Focus Features’ “BlacKkKlansman,” also picked up nominations for Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay, which are also his first Oscar nominations in those categories. He was previously nominated for Best Original Screenplay for 1989’s “Do the Right Thing” and Best Documentary Feature for 1997’s “4 Little Girls.” Lee  also received an honorary Oscar (a non-competitive prize) in 2015.

Spike Lee and Adam Driver on the set of “BlacKkKlansman” (Photo by David Lee/ Focus Features)

Here is the complete list of nominations for the 2019 Academy Awards:

Best Picture
“Black Panther”
(Producer: Kevin Feige)

“BlacKkKlansman”
(Producers: Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Raymond Mansfield, Jordan Peele and Spike Lee)

“Bohemian Rhapsody”
(Producer: Graham King)

“The Favourite”
(Producers: Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday and Yorgos Lanthimos)

“Green Book”
(Producers: Jim Burke, Charles B. Wessler, Brian Currie, Peter Farrelly and Nick Vallelonga)

“Roma”
(Producers: Gabriela Rodríguez and Alfonso Cuarón)

“A Star Is Born”
(Producers: Bill Gerber, Bradley Cooper and Lynette Howell Taylor)

“Vice”
(Producers: Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Adam McKay and Kevin Messick)

Best Actor
Christian Bale, “Vice”
Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”
Willem Dafoe, “At Eternity’s Gate”
Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”
Viggo Mortensen, “Green Book”

Best Actress
Yalitza Aparicio, “Roma”
Glenn Close, “The Wife”
Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”
Lady Gaga, “A Star Is Born”
Melissa McCarthy, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

Best Supporting Actor
Mahershala Ali, “Green Book”
Adam Driver, “BlacKkKlansman”
Sam Elliott, “A Star Is Born”
Richard E. Grant, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Sam Rockwell, “Vice”

Best Supporting Actress
Amy Adams, “Vice”
Marina de Tavira, “Roma”
Regina King, “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Emma Stone, “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”

Best Director
Spike Lee, “BlacKkKlansman”
Paweł Pawlikowski, “Cold War”
Yorgos Lanthimos, “The Favourite”
Alfonso Cuarón, “Roma”
Adam McKay, “Vice”

Best Animated Feature
“Incredibles 2,” directed by Brad Bird; produced by John Walker and Nicole Paradis Grindle

“Isle of Dogs,” directed and produced by Wes Anderson; produced by Scott Rudin, Steven Rales and Jeremy Dawson

“Mirai,” directed by Mamoru Hosoda; produced by Yuichiro Saito

“Ralph Breaks the Internet,” directed by Rich Moore and Phil Johnston; produced by Clark Spencer

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” directed by Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman; produced by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller

Best Animated Short
“Animal Behaviour,” directed and produced by Alison Snowden and David Fine
“Bao,” directed by Domee Shi; produced by Becky Neiman-Cobb
“Late Afternoon,” directed by Louise Bagnall; produced by Nuria González Blanco
“One Small Step,” directed by Andrew Chesworth and Bobby Pontillas
“Weekends,” directed and produced by Trevor Jimenez

Best Adapted Screenplay
“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
“BlacKkKlansman,” Charlie Wachtel, David Rabinowitz, Kevin Willmott and Spike Lee
“Can You Ever Forgive Me?,” Nicole Holofcener and Jeff Whitty
“If Beale Street Could Talk,” Barry Jenkins
“A Star Is Born,” Eric Roth, Bradley Cooper and Will Fetters

Best Original Screenplay
“The Favourite,” Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara
“First Reformed,” Paul Schrader
“Green Book,” Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie and Peter Farrelly
“Roma,” Alfonso Cuarón
“Vice,” Adam McKay

Best Cinematography
“Cold War,” Łukasz Żal
“The Favourite,” Robbie Ryan
“Never Look Away,” Caleb Deschanel
“Roma,” Alfonso Cuarón
“A Star Is Born,” Matthew Libatique

Best Documentary Feature
“Free Solo,” directed and produced by Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyil; produced by Evan Hayes and Shannon Dill

“Hale County This Morning, This Evening,” directed and produced by RaMell Ross; produced by Joslyn Barnes and Su Kim

“Minding the Gap,” directed and produced by Bing Liu; produced by Diane Quon

“Of Fathers and Sons,” directed by Talal Derki; produced by Ansgar Frerich, Eva Kemme and Tobias N. Siebert

“RBG,” directed and produced by Betsy West and Julie Cohen

Best Documentary Short Subject
“Black Sheep,” directed by Ed Perkins; produced by Jonathan Chinn
“End Game,” directed and produced by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman
“Lifeboat,” directed and produced by Skye Fitzgerald
“A Night at the Garden,” directed and produced by Marshall Curry
“Period. End of Sentence.,” directed and produced by Rayka Zehtabchi

Best Live Action Short Film
“Detainment,” directed and produced by Vincent Lambe; produced by Darren Mahon
“Fauve,” directed by Jeremy Comte; produced by Maria Gracia Turgeon
“Marguerite,” directed by Marianne Farley; produced by Marie-Hélène Panisset
“Mother,” directed by Rodrigo Sorogoyen; produced by María del Puy Alvarado
“Skin,” directed and produced by Guy Nattiv; produced by Jaime Ray Newman

Best Foreign Language Film
“Capernaum” (Lebanon)
“Cold War” (Poland)
“Never Look Away” (Germany)
“Roma” (Mexico)
“Shoplifters” (Japan)

Best Film Editing
“BlacKkKlansman,” Barry Alexander Brown
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” John Ottman
“Green Book,” Patrick J. Don Vito
“The Favourite,” Yorgos Mavropsaridis
“Vice,” Hank Corwin

Best Sound Editing
“Black Panther,” Benjamin A. Burtt and Steve Boeddeker
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” John Warhurst
“First Man,” Ai-Ling Lee and Mildred Iatrou Morgan
“A Quiet Place,” Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl
“Roma,” Sergio Diaz and Skip Lievsay

Best Sound Mixing
“Black Panther,” Steve Boeddeker, Brandon Proctor and Peter Devlin
“Bohemian Rhapsody,” Paul Massey, Tim Cavagin and John Casali
“First Man,” Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño, Ai-Ling Lee and Mary H. Ellis
“Roma,” Skip Lievsay, Craig Henighan and José Antonio García
“A Star Is Born,” Tom Ozanich, Dean Zupancic, Jason Ruder and Steve Morrow

Best Production Design
“Black Panther”
Production Design: Hannah Beachler; Set Decoration: Jay Hart

“The Favourite”
Production Design: Fiona Crombie; Set Decoration: Alice Felton

“First Man”
Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Kathy Lucas

“Mary Poppins Returns”
Production Design: John Myhre; Set Decoration: Gordon Sim

“Roma”
Production Design: Eugenio Caballero; Set Decoration: Bárbara Enríquez

Best Original Score
“BlacKkKlansman,” Terence Blanchard
“Black Panther,” Ludwig Goransson
“If Beale Street Could Talk,” Nicholas Britell
“Isle of Dogs,” Alexandre Desplat
“Mary Poppins Returns,” Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman

Best Original Song
“All the Stars” from “Black Panther,” song written by Kendrick Lamar, Solana Rowe (SZA), Mark Spears and Anthony Tiffith

“I’ll Fight” from “RBG,” song written by Diane Warren

“The Place Where Lost Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns,” song written by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman

“Shallow” from “A Star Is Born,” song written by Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando, Andrew Wyatt and Benjamin Rice

“When A Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings” from “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” song written by David Rawlings and Gillian Welch

Best Makeup and Hairstyling
“Border,” Göran Lundström and Pamela Goldammer
“Mary Queen of Scots,” Jenny Shircore, Marc Pilcher and Jessica Brooks
“Vice,” Greg Cannom, Kate Biscoe and Patricia DeHaney

Best Costume Design
“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” Mary Zophres
“Black Panther,” Ruth E. Carter
“The Favourite,” Sandy Powell
“Mary Poppins Returns,” Sandy Powell
“Mary Queen of Scots,” Alexandra Byrne

Best Visual Effects
“Avengers: Infinity War,” Dan DeLeeuw, Kelly Port, Russell Earl and Dan Sudick

“Christopher Robin,” Christopher Lawrence, Michael Eames, Theo Jones and Chris Corbould

“First Man,” Paul Lambert, Ian Hunter, Tristan Myles and J.D. Schwalm

“Ready Player One,” Roger Guyett, Grady Cofer, Matthew E. Butler and David Shirk

“Solo: A Star Wars Story,” Rob Bredow, Patrick Tubach, Neal Scanlan and Dominic Tuohy

2018 AFI Awards: 10 best movies and 10 best TV shows announced

December 4, 2018

AFI

The following is a press release from the American Film Institute:

The American Film Institute (AFI) announced today the honorees of AFI AWARDS 2018, celebrating the year’s most outstanding achievements in the art of the moving image — with 10 films and 10 television programs deemed culturally and artistically significant.

In addition to the 20 honorees, AFI also recognizes ROMA with an AFI Special Award, designated for a work of excellence outside the Institute’s criteria for American film.

AFI AWARDS honorees are selected based on works that advance the art of the moving image, enhance the rich cultural heritage of America’s art form, inspire audiences and artists alike and make a mark on American society.

AFI MOVIES OF THE YEAR

BLACKKKLANSMAN
BLACK PANTHER
EIGHTH GRADE
THE FAVOURITE
FIRST REFORMED
GREEN BOOK
IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK
MARY POPPINS RETURNS
A QUIET PLACE
A STAR IS BORN

AFI TV PROGRAMS OF THE YEAR

THE AMERICANS
THE ASSASSINATION OF GIANNI VERSACE: AMERICAN CRIME STORY
ATLANTA
BARRY
BETTER CALL SAUL
THE KOMINSKY METHOD
THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL
POSE
SUCCESSION
THIS IS US

AFI SPECIAL AWARD

ROMA

Marking the 19th chapter in the American Film Institute’s ongoing almanac of the moving image, the 2018 entries join a notable group of previous AFI AWARDS honorees — works of significance that contribute to the rich cultural legacy and define the state of the art form. View all past AFI AWARDS honorees here.

AFI AWARDS selections are made through a jury process where AFI Trustees, scholars, artists and critics determine the year’s most outstanding achievements and provide contextual rationales for each selection.

This year’s juries — one for film and one for television — were chaired by AFI Board of Trustees Vice Chairs Tom Pollock (former Vice Chairman of MCA, Chairman of Universal Pictures) for film and Richard Frank (former Chairman of Walt Disney Television, President of Walt Disney Studios, President of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences) for television. The juries featured acclaimed artists such as David Benioff, Joan Chen, Courtney B. Vance and Alfre Woodard; renowned authors and scholars representing prestigious universities with recognized motion picture arts and television programs; film historian Leonard Maltin; the AFI Board of Trustees; and film and television critics from media outlets such as the Los Angeles Times, NPR, Rolling Stone, TV Guide, Vanity Fair, Variety and The Washington Post.

Honorees will gather on January 4, 2019, for recognition at the annual AFI AWARDS private luncheon in Los Angeles, CA — an event favored by the entertainment community for its informal intimacy and its inclusive acknowledgement of excellence. At the luncheon, AFI will present jury rationales providing artistic and cultural context for the selection of each honoree.

The AFI AWARDS luncheon will be sponsored by Audi, a supporter of AFI and its programs for the past 15 years. The AFI AWARDS luncheon is also sponsored by American Airlines, the official airline of AFI.

About the American Film Institute
The American Film Institute was established by presidential proclamation in the White House Rose Garden, and launched its national mandate on June 5, 1967 — to preserve the heritage of the motion picture, to honor the artists and their work and to educate the next generation of storytellers. AFI’s founding Trustees included Chairman Gregory Peck, Vice Chairman Sidney Poitier, Francis Ford Coppola, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., Jack Valenti and George Stevens, Jr., as Director.

About Audi
Audi of America, Inc. and its U.S. dealers offer a full line of German-engineered luxury vehicles. AUDI AG is among the most successful luxury automotive brands, delivering about 1.878 million vehicles globally in 2017. In the U.S., Audi of America sold nearly 227,000 vehicles in 2017 and broke all-time company sales records for the eighth straight year. Visit audiusa.com or media.audiusa.com for more information regarding Audi vehicles and business topics.

2018 Hollywood Film Awards: See photos and videos

November 4, 2018

Awkwafina at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images)

The following is a press release from Dick Clark Productions:

The 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards brought together Hollywood’s elite to honor the year’s most talked about, and highly anticipated, actors, actresses, films and those who help bring them to life.  The awards ceremony, celebrating its 22nd anniversary as the official launch of the awards season, was hosted by actress and comedian Awkwafina, and took place at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills.  In its 22-year history, more than 320 of the world’s biggest stars and filmmakers have been highlighted at the Hollywood Film Awards and more than 130 of the honorees have gone on to garner Oscar nominations and/or wins.

The night kicked off with Awkwafina’s biting humor, and was filled with many intimate and touching moments, as the honorees expressed their pride in their featured works.

Brad Pitt and Felix Van Groeningen at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

After a sincere introduction from Brad Pitt, Felix van Groeningen voiced his utmost gratitude to receive the “Hollywood Breakthrough Director Award” and to be lucky enough to make a film like “Beautiful Boy.” Brad Bird kept his Hollywood Animation Award acceptance speech short and sweet as he stressed the need to keep making animation films for “dreaming and for dreamers.”

Damien Chazelle and Ryan Gosling at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)

Ryan Gosling gave an impassioned speech on the marvel and genius of Damien Chazelle and presented him with the Hollywood Director Award, which Chazelle humbly accepted.

Taraji P. Henson (L) and John David Washington at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

Taraji P. Henson lauded the brilliance of John David Washington and his ability to make a period piece, that is still so relevant today, as he was honored with the Hollywood Breakout Performance Actor Award.

After accepting the Hollywood Documentary Award on behalf of Don Argott for “Believer,” Dan Reynolds performed an extremely emotional rendition of the documentary’s original song, “Skipping Stones.”

Dan Reynolds and Hans Zimmer at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

Danny Huston introduced New Hollywood Actress Award recipient Yalitza Aparicio who gave a touching speech in Spanish explaining that she hopes the “win of the performance is felt by the people of Mexico.”

Yalitza Aparicio at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Emma McIntrye/Getty Images)

Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

Anne Hathaway took the stage to present the “Hollywood Actor Award” to Hugh Jackman, applauding his many achievements including his “20 plus year juggernaut career,” his “sexiest man alive title,” and most importantly, “his widely known reputation for being the nicest guy in Hollywood.”

 

Sterling K. Brown presented the award for “Hollywood Breakout Ensemble” to the cast of “Crazy Rich Asians.”  Several of the cast members including Constance Wu, Henry Golding and Michelle Yeoh, remarked at what an incomparable experience they’ve had making this film and how impactful it has been to be able to share this story with a fully Asian cast.

“Crazy Rich Asians” stars Constance Wu (at podium) and (L-R) Henry Golding, Jimmy O. Yang, Ronny Chieng, Nico Santos, Michelle Yeoh, Lisa Lu, Awkwafina, Harry Shum Jr., and Ken Jeong at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images)

Amandla Stenberg and Janelle Monáe at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)

Janelle Monáe was on hand to present Amandla Stenberg with the Hollywood Breakout Performance Actress Award, and shared with the room what a fierce and fearless woman Stenberg is growing up to be.  Stenberg expressed her hope that the film “The Hate U Give” encourages people to stand up and be heard.

 

Christian Slater presented Glenn Close with her Hollywood Actress Award for her unparalleled performance in the film “The Wife.”  Close received a standing ovation before thanking all of the members of her team and all the filmmakers for staying with her throughout the entire process.

Glenn Close at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

Michael B. Jordan came out to recognize “Black Panther” producer Nate Moore and director Ryan Coogler with the Hollywood Film Award.  He spoke to his experience both making and seeing the movie, saying that “for everyone with African roots, it spoke to us on an intensely powerful level.”

Michael B. Jordan. Ryan Coogler and Nate Moore at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

Nicole Kidman and Shailene Woodley at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

The final award of the evening went to Hollywood Career Achievement Award recipient Nicole Kidman, and was presented by Kidman’s co-star Shailene Woodley who was overwhelmed with gratitude that their lives crossed paths.  Kidman was welcomed with a standing ovation and thanked those in the room and in the industry for allowing her to play the women she’s played and tell their stories.  She vowed to “always give back to [her] craft!”

This year’s award show honored the following:

Hollywood Career Achievement Award

Nicole Kidman, presented by Shailene Woodley

Hollywood Film Award

“Black Panther,” presented by Michael B. Jordan

Hollywood Actress Award

Glenn Close for “The Wife,” presented by Christian Slater

Hollywood Actor Award

Hugh Jackman for “The Front Runner,” presented by Anne Hathaway

Hollywood Supporting Actor Award

Timothée Chalamet for “Beautiful Boy,” presented by Armie Hammer

Hollywood Ensemble Award

Viggo Mortensen, Mahershala Ali, Linda Cardellini for “Green Book,” presented by Octavia Spencer

(Back, L-R) Octavia Spencer with “Green Book” stars Dimiter Marinov, Sebastian Maniscalco, Joe Cortese, Nick Vallelonga, Mike Hatton, Brian Hayes Currie, (front L-R) Mahershala Ali, and Viggo Mortensen at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 2018. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

Hollywood Breakout Ensemble Award

Constance Wu, Henry Golding, Michelle Yeoh, Gemma Chan, Lisa Lu, Awkwafina, Ken Jeong, Sonoya Mizuno, Chris Pang, Jimmy O. Yang, Ronny Chieng, Remi Hii, Nico Santos for “Crazy Rich Asians,” presented by Sterling K. Brown

Hollywood Breakout Performance Actress Award

Amandla Stenberg for “The Hate U Give,” presented by Janelle Monáe

Hollywood Breakout Performance Actor Award

John David Washington for “BlakKklansman,” presented by Taraji P. Henson

New Hollywood Actress Award

 Yalitza Aparicio for “Roma,” presented by Danny Huston

Hollywood Director Award

Damien Chazelle for “First Man,” presented by Ryan Gosling

Hollywood Screenwriter Award

Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga, Brian Hayes Currie for “Green Book,” presented by Michael Keaton

Hollywood Breakthrough Director Award

Felix van Groeningen for “Beautiful Boy,” presented by Brad Pitt

Hollywood Documentary Award

“Believer,” presented by Adam Lambert

Hollywood Animation Award

“Incredibles 2,” presented by Sophia Bush

Hollywood Cinematography Award

Matthew Libatique for “A Star Is Born”

Hollywood Film Composer Award

Justin Hurwitz for “First Man”

Hollywood Editor Award

Tom Cross for “First Man”

Hollywood Visual Effects Award

Dan Deleeuw, Kelly Port, Russell Earl, Dan Sudick for “Avengers: Infinity War”

Hollywood Costume Design Award

Sandy Powell for “The Favourite”

Hollywood Make-Up & Hair Styling Award

Jenny Schircore, Sarah Kelly, Hannah Edwards for “Mary Queen of Scots” 

Hollywood Production Design Award

Hannah Beachler for “Black Panther”

Hollywood Sound Award

Erik Aadahl, Ethan Van der Ryn, Brandon Proctor for “A Quiet Place”

 

Honoree Portraits are available on the show’s Twitter and Instagram pages. For all information and highlights, please visit the website for the Hollywood Film Awards.

For the latest news, follow the “Hollywood Film Awards” on social and join the conversation by using the official hashtag for the show, #HollywoodAwards.

Twitter: @HollywoodAwards
Facebook: Facebook.com/HollywoodAwards
Instagram: @hollywoodawards
YouTube: youtube.com/HollywoodAwards

 

About Dick Clark Productions
Dick Clark Productions (DCP) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and DCP. DCP also owns one of the world’s most unique and extensive entertainment archive libraries with over 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances and legendary programming. DCP is a division of Valence Media, a diversified media company with divisions and strategic investments in premium television, wide release film, specialty film, live events and digital media. For additional information, visit www.dickclark.com.

About The Hollywood Film Awards
The Hollywood Film Awards, founded in 1997, were created to celebrate Hollywood and launch the awards season. The recipients of the awards are selected by an Advisory Team for their body of work and/or a film(s) that is to be released during the calendar year. For additional information, visit www.hollywoodawards.com.

2018 Hollywood Film Awards: ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Incredibles 2’ among honorees

October 30, 2018

The following is a press release from Dick Clark Productions:

Dick Clark Productions announced today that Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther” will receive this year’s Hollywood Film Award, and Pixar Animation Studios’ “Incredibles 2” will receive the Hollywood Animation Award at the 22nd Annual Hollywood Film Awards, taking place on Sunday, November 4 at The Beverly Hilton. Both films received wide critical acclaim and broke box office records this year. “Black Panther” became a cultural phenomenon that has broken boundaries and created a movement, gracing the cover of Time Magazine. “Black Panther” had the highest grossing non-sequel opening weekend of all time, showing that diversity and representation in front of and behind the camera can equal global box-office success. “Incredibles 2” marked the biggest opening weekend in history for an animated film, grossing more than $1.2 billion globally to date and garnering widespread critical acclaim. Two-time Oscar winner writer/director Brad Bird’s follow up to 2004’s Oscar-winning “The Incredibles” expands upon the original’s daring concept of a family of Supers who struggle against society’s fickle embrace while tasked with stopping a devious plot to undermine the public’s belief and faith in government and national security. Elastigirl (Holly Hunter) this time takes center stage as the family’s secret weapon, while Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson) stays home to care for the children, who display increasingly curious powers of their own.

The Hollywood Film Awards will also continue its tradition of recognizing excellence in the art of cinema in all disciplines of filmmaking. The honorees in the categories of Cinematography, Film Composer, Editor, Visual Effects, Costume Design, Make-Up & Hair Styling, Production Design and Sound include:

Hollywood Cinematography Award
Matthew Libatique, “A Star Is Born”

Hollywood Film Composer Award
Justin Hurwitz, “First Man”

Hollywood Editor Award
Tom Cross, “First Man”

Hollywood Visual Effects Award
Dan Deleeuw, Kelly Port, Russel Earl, Dan Sudick, “Avengers: Infinity War”

Hollywood Costume Design Award
Sandy Powell, “The Favourite”

Hollywood Make-Up & Hair Styling Award
Jenny Schircore, Sarah Kelly, Hannah Edwards, “Mary Queen of Scots”

Hollywood Production Design Award
Hannah Beachler, “Black Panther”

Hollywood Sound Award
Erik Aadahl, Ethan Van der Ryn, Brandon Proctor, “A Quiet Place”

The Hollywood Film Awards, honoring the most acclaimed films and actors while previewing highly anticipated films and talent for the upcoming year, also acknowledges artists in the categories of Cinematography, Visual Effects, Film Composing, Costume Design, Editing, Production Design, Sound and Makeup & Hairstyling. In its 22-year history, more than 320 of the world’s biggest stars and filmmakers have been highlighted at the Hollywood Film Awards and more than 130 of the honorees have gone on to garner Oscar nominations and/or wins.

ABOUT THE HONOREES
“Black Panther” is director Ryan Coogler’s take on a modern African hero and a utopian vision of what an uncolonized Africa might look like.  The film explores the conflict between two powerful men, one African and one African-American, who are mirror images of each other, each grappling with his own history, home and very identity.  When Prince T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) becomes king of the hidden, technologically advanced kingdom Wakanda, he is forced to defend his throne against rogue mercenary Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan). Wakanda is also alive with strong, intelligent women, from Wakanda’s elite all-female security force, led by Lupita Nyong’o and Danai Gurira, to T’Challa’s own tech-savvy sister (Letitia Wright) and mother (Angela Bassett), who are portrayed as equals to the men they protect and advise.

In “Incredibles 2,” Helen (voice of Holly Hunter) is called on to lead a campaign to bring Supers back, while Bob (voice of Craig T. Nelson) navigates the day-to-day heroics of “normal” life at home with Violet (voice of Sarah Vowell), Dash (voice of Huck Milner) and baby Jack-Jack, whose super powers are about to be discovered. Their mission is derailed, however, when a new villain emerges with a brilliant and dangerous plot that threatens everything. But the Parrs don’t shy away from a challenge, especially with Frozone (voice of Samuel L. Jackson) by their side. That’s what makes this family so Incredible. Disney Pixar’s “Incredibles 2” is written and directed by Academy® Award-winner Brad Bird (“Iron Giant,” “The Incredibles,” “Ratatouille”) and produced by John Walker (“The Incredibles,” “Tomorrowland”) and Nicole Grindle (“Sanjay’s Super Team” short, “Toy Story 3” associate producer).

They join previously announced honorees Nicole Kidman, who will receive this year’s Hollywood Career Achievement Award, Glenn Close, who will receive the Hollywood Actress Award, Hugh Jackman, who will receive the Hollywood Actor Award, Damien Chazelle, who will receive the Hollywood Director Award, Timothée Chalamet who will receive the Hollywood Supporting Actor Award, “Green Book,” which will receive the Hollywood Ensemble Award, “Crazy Rich Asians,” which will receive the Hollywood Breakout Ensemble Award, Amandla Stenberg, who will receive the Hollywood Breakout Performance Actress Award, John David Washington, who will receive the Hollywood Breakout Performance Actor Award, Felix Van Groeningen, who will receive the  Hollywood Breakthrough Director Award, Yalitza Aparicio, who will receive the New Hollywood Award, Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga and Brian Hayes Currie, who will receive the Hollywood Screenwriter Award for “Green Book,” and “Believer” will receive the Hollywood Documentary Award.

For the latest news, follow the “Hollywood Film Awards” on social and join the conversation by using the official hashtag for the show, #HollywoodAwards.

Twitter: @HollywoodAwards
Facebook: Facebook.com/HollywoodAwards
Instagram: @hollywoodawards
YouTube: youtube.com/HollywoodAwards

About Dick Clark Productions
Dick Clark Productions (DCP) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and DCP. DCP also owns one of the world’s most unique and extensive entertainment archive libraries with over 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances and legendary programming. dcp is a division of Valence Media, a diversified media company with divisions and strategic investments in premium television, wide release film, specialty film, live events and digital media. For additional information, visit www.dickclark.com.

About The Hollywood Film Awards
The Hollywood Film Awards, founded in 1997, were created to celebrate Hollywood and launch the awards season. The recipients of the awards are selected by an Advisory Team for their body of work and/or a film(s) that is to be released during the calendar year. For additional information, visit www.hollywoodawards.com.

2018 American Music Awards: Taylor Swift is the top winner; Camila Cabello also wins big

October 9, 2018

by Carla Hay

AMAs logo

 

With four prizes, including Artist of the Year, Taylor Swift was the top winner at the 2018 American Music Awards, which were presented on October 9 at Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles.  Camila Cabello, a former member of Fifth Harmony, also won four American Music Awards, including New Artist of the Year. Cabello was an opening act for Swift on Swift’s “Reputation” tour. Tracee Ellis Ross hosted the American Music Awards show for the second year in a row. The awards are voted for online by the public.

Swift now has 23 American Music Awards, the most ever won by a female artist. The previous record holder was Whitney Houston, who won 21 American Music Awards.

At the 2018 ceremony, Swift also did her first award-show performance in more than two years. She opened the 2018 American Music Awards with “I Did Something Bad.” Swift was one of several people on the show, including Ross and presenter Billy Eichner, who urged people to vote in their upcoming political elections.

With eight nominations each, Cardi B and Drake were the top nominees for the 2018 American Music Awards, but Drake (who did not attend the ceremony) did not win any of the prizes. Cardi B won three American Music Awards, and so did Kane Brown. Post Malone won two American Music Awards.

Other performers on the show included Twenty One Pilots (“Jumpsuit”), Carrie Underwood (“Spinning Bottles”), Cabello (“Consequences”), Mariah Carey (who sang the live world premiere of “With You”), Dua Lipa (who did a medley of “One Kiss” and “Electricity”), Jennifer Lopez (“Limitless”) and Ella Mai (“Boo’d Up”). Imagine Dragons had been announced as performers several weeks before the ceremony, but the band’s appearance was canceled with no explanation.

“Bohemian Rhapsody” stars Rami Malek, Joseph Mazzello and Gwilym Lee introduced Panic! At the Disco, which performed Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” from a concert in Brisbane, Australia.

There were also several on-stage collaborations. Cardi B featuring Bad Bunny and J Balvin performed their hit song “I Like It” on television for the first time. Benny Blanco joined forces with Halsey and Khalid for their hit “Eastside.” Ciara featuring Missy Elliott did a medley of “Level Up” and “Dose.” Post Malone was joined by Ty Dolla $ign for their hit “Psycho” after Malone performed “Better Now.”  Shawn Mendes paired with Zedd for “Lost in Japan.” Gladys Knight, Ledisi, Mary Mary, Donnie McClurkin and CeCe Winans closed out the show did a special tribute to Aretha Franklin, who died of pancreatic cancer on August 16, 2018.

Other presenters included Kelsea Ballerini, Tyra Banks, Kane Brown, Chloe x Halle, Macaulay Culkin, Lauren Daigle, Sara Gilbert, Kathryn Hahn, Amber Heard, Vanessa Hudgens, Taran Killam, Leighton Meester, Heidi Klum, Liza Koshy, Lenny Kravitz, Normani, Rita Ora, Busy Philipps, Bebe Rexha, Florida Georgia Line, Thomas Rhett, Evan Ross, Ashlee Simpson-Ross, John Stamos, Amandla Stenberg, The Chainsmokers and Constance Wu.

YouTube Music was the presenting sponsor of the 2018 American Music Awards. Capital One Savor Card and Subaru of America, Inc. were sponsors of the show. The media partner was Cumulus Media/Westwood One.

The 2018 American Music Awards show was produced by Dick Clark Productions. Barry Adelman, Mark Bracco and host Ross were executive Producers. Larry Klein was a producer.

The following is the complete list of nominees and winners of the 2018 American Music Awards:

*=winner

ARTIST OF THE YEAR
Drake
Imagine Dragons
Post Malone
Ed Sheeran
Taylor Swift*

NEW ARTIST OF THE YEAR PRESENTED BY CAPITAL ONE SAVOR CARD
Camila Cabello*
Cardi B
Khalid
Dua Lipa
XXXTentacion

COLLABORATION OF THE YEAR
Camila Cabello featuring Young Thug, “Havana”*
Post Malone featuring 21 Savage, “Rockstar”
Bruno Mars featuring Cardi B, “Finesse”
Bebe Rexha featuring Florida Georgia Line, “Meant To Be”
Zedd, Maren Morris & Grey, “The Middle”

TOUR OF THE YEAR
Beyoncé & JAY-Z
Bruno Mars
Ed Sheeran
Taylor Swift*
U2

FAVORITE MUSIC VIDEO
Camila Cabello featuring Young Thug, “Havana”*
Cardi B, “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)”
Drake, “God’s Plan”

FAVORITE SOCIAL ARTIST 
BTS*
Cardi B
Ariana Grande
Demi Lovato
Shawn Mendes

FAVORITE MALE ARTIST – POP/ROCK
Drake
Post Malone*
Ed Sheeran

FAVORITE FEMALE ARTIST – POP/ROCK
Camila Cabello
Cardi B
Taylor Swift*

FAVORITE DUO OR GROUP – POP/ROCK
Imagine Dragons
Maroon 5
Migos*

FAVORITE ALBUM – POP/ROCK
Drake, “Scorpion”
Ed Sheeran, “÷ (Divide)”
Taylor Swift, “Reputation”*

FAVORITE SONG  – POP/ROCK
Camila Cabello featuring Young Thug, “Havana”*
Drake, “God’s Plan”
Ed Sheeran, “Perfect”

FAVORITE MALE ARTIST – COUNTRY
Kane Brown*
Luke Bryan
Thomas Rhett

FAVORITE FEMALE ARTIST – COUNTRY
Kelsea Ballerini
Maren Morris
Carrie Underwood*

FAVORITE DUO or GROUP – COUNTRY
Dan + Shay
Florida Georgia Line*
LANCO

FAVORITE ALBUM – COUNTRY
Kane Brown, “Kane Brown”*
Luke Combs, “This One’s For You”
Thomas Rhett, “Life Changes”

FAVORITE SONG  – COUNTRY
Kane Brown, “Heaven”*
Dan + Shay, “Tequila”
Bebe Rexha & Florida Georgia Line, “Meant To Be”

FAVORITE ARTIST – RAP/HIP-HOP
Cardi B*
Drake
Post Malone

FAVORITE ALBUM – RAP/HIP-HOP
Drake, “Scorpion”
Lil Uzi Vert, “Luv Is Rage 2”
Post Malone, “Beerbongs & Bentleys”*

FAVORITE SONG – RAP/HIP-HOP
Cardi B, “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)”*
Drake, “God’s Plan”
Post Malone featuring 21 Savage, “Rockstar”

FAVORITE MALE ARTIST – SOUL/R&B
Khalid*
Bruno Mars
The Weeknd

FAVORITE FEMALE ARTIST – SOUL/R&B
Ella Mai
Rihanna*
SZA

FAVORITE ALBUM – SOUL/R&B
Khalid, “American Teen”
SZA, “CTRL”
XXXTentacion, “17”*

FAVORITE SONG – SOUL/R&B
Khalid, “Young Dumb & Broke”
Ella Mai, “Boo’d Up”
Bruno Mars featuring Cardi B, “Finesse”*

FAVORITE ARTIST  – ALTERNATIVE ROCK
Imagine Dragons
Panic! At The Disco*
Portugal. The Man

FAVORITE ARTIST  – ADULT CONTEMPORARY
Shawn Mendes*
P!NK
Ed Sheeran

FAVORITE ARTIST  – LATIN
J Balvin
Daddy Yankee*
Ozuna

FAVORITE ARTIST  – CONTEMPORARY INSPIRATIONAL
Lauren Daigle*
MercyMe
Zach Williams

FAVORITE ARTIST  – ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC (EDM)
The Chainsmokers
Marshmello*
Zedd

FAVORITE SOUNDTRACK
“Black Panther: The Album, Music From and Inspired By”*
“The Greatest Showman”
“The Fate of the Furious: The Album”

Copyright 2017-2022 Culture Mix
CULTURE MIX