Review: ‘Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World,’ starring Chance the Rapper

August 13, 2021

by Carla Hay

Chance the Rapper in “Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World” (Photo courtesy of House of Kicks and Park Pictures)

“Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World”

Directed by Jake Schreier 

Culture Representation: Taking place in Chicago on April 8, 2017, the concert documentary “Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World” features a racially diverse group of performers and about 1,500 audience members (mostly white and black, with some Latinos and Asians), who are mostly young people, gathered for a concert by Chance the Rapper.

Culture Clash: Whimsical and carefree childhood themes are on stage, while the song lyrics sometimes address social unrest and drug use. 

Culture Audience: Besides the obvious target audience of Chance the Rapper fans and people who like hip-hop, “Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World” will appeal to people who enjoy high-energy concert films that are creative without being too extravagant and over-the-top.

Chance the Rapper in “Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World” (Photo courtesy of House of Kicks and Park Pictures)

On April 18, 2017, Grammy-winning hip-hop artist Chance the Rapper held a secret concert in his hometown of Chicago. About 1,500 people were invited to watch him perform songs off of his breakthrough 2016 mixtape album “Coloring Book,” plus other notable tunes. (Based on who’s in the audience, most attendees were under the age of 30.) The result is this concert documentary that doesn’t do anything groundbreaking in its production and staging, but it’s a lively showcase for Chance the Rapper and his charismatic showmanship.

At 64 minutes long, it’s a briskly paced film that’s perfect for people who want a fairly quick dose of Chance the Rapper performing live. However, if the documentary had been 90 minutes or longer, it would have benefited from more behind-the-scenes footage of how this show’s production elements were put together. According to what Chance the Rapper says in the movie, the basic elements of the production happened in just a few weeks. It took a lot longer than a few weeks to plan it though.

In an interview shown before the movie gets to the concert footage, Chance the Rapper says that he had a vision for years to do a show like this—steeped in childhood nostalgia but reflective of who he is as an artist who expresses adult experiences. In keeping with the “Coloring Book”/childhood theme, fans who were invited to the show were transported to the venue in yellow school buses. One of the stage props is a Sunday Candy store.

Before getting to the concert footage, the movie begins with some grainy, archival footage in black and white of Chance the Rapper (whose real name is Chancellor Jonathan Bennett) at age 8 or 9, performing at a talent contest by singing and doing some Michael Jackson-inspired dance moves (including the moonwalk) and being elated when he won the contest. Then there’s a standard montage of people who work with Chance the Rapper talking about how great and visionary he is. It’s fairly predictable commentary that you would expect from people on a celebrity’s payroll.

Tour manager Colleen Mares says that Chance the Rapper becoming a husband and father affected his spirituality in a positive way. Choir director Rachel Robinson echoes those thoughts, by saying, “His musical journey is parallel to his spiritual journey.” Other people who weigh in with their praise include film director Jake Schreier, production designer Michael Apostolos, drummer Greg “Stix” Landfair, sound engineer Jabari “Jack Red” Rayford and choreographers Pause Eddie and Ian Eastwood.

In all, there were about 100 people in the crew who worked on the show, according to what Chance Rapper says in the documentary interview. He says his first thought in deciding to do the concert was: “How do we mic the audience?” He adds that he didn’t want it to be the type of concert film where the audio from the audience was toned down. He wanted the concert to feel fully immersive. “I like creating experiences,” he says.

As an example of how important sound is in enhancing the visual experience, he demonstrates in a kitchen how hearing a running faucet before you walk into a room can affect your anticipation of what to see in the room. And then, the movie shows how perspectives change when you see faucet with running water, but you don’t hear the water. Chance the Rapper is obviously fascinated with the technical aspects of filmmaking, which is why if this documentary has been longer, it definitely needed more behind-the-scenes insight into his decisions for how this concert was staged and filmed. (He’s one of the documentary’s producers.)

Not much in this concert will be surprising to people who saw Chance the Rapper on his “Coloring Book” tour, since this concert was filmed during the tour. At times, there’s a choir on stage. There’s also a string orchestra led by a conductor. For “Same Drugs,” he sings and plays the piano while sitting next to someone dressed as a bird wearing a hippie-like headband. Even though Chance the Rapper has collaborated with many artists, there are no surprise guest apperances in this concert documentary.

Some of the concert highlights include his rousing renditions of “Blessings Part 1” and “Blessings Part 2” with the choir and getting the audience to sing along like it’s a church revival. A more contemplative moment comes with “Summer Friends,” where it’s just Chance the Rapper on stage accompanied by a keyboardist using a vocal effects processor, as they’re bathed in a soft white lighting glow. Other songs performed in the film include “D.R.A.M. Sings Special,” “Everybody’s Something,” “Windows,” “Angels,” “All Night,” “We Go High” and “All We Got.”

The show features high-energy hip-hop backup dancers. And there’s some theatrical acting on stage too, with a set piece constructed like the outside of a nightclub and a bouncer who won’t let hopeful patrons past the security rope. It’s a little corny and better-suited for a Broadway show, but at least it does not take up too much of the concert.

Chance the Rapper is not a highly accomplished dancer (he lets his backup dancers do the flashy dance moves), but he’s very good at commanding the stage. He also excels at connecting with his audience. One of the highlights of the film is toward the end, when he goes down to the audience level in the front row to touch people hands and give them high-fives. He also namechecks Chicago multiple times, and says at one point, “Chicago, thanks so much for all you’ve done for me!”

“Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World” is self-distributed through Chance the Rapper’s House of Kicks company, exclusively at AMC Theatres for a limited time. It’s reportedly the first time that a music artist has self-distributed a film with AMC Theatres. Considering that Chance the Rapper is not touring in 2021 (he’s only scheduled to perform at Milwaukee’s Summerfest in 2021), seeing this documentary in a movie theater will be the closest that most of his fans will have to experiencing a full Chance the Rapper concert with some late 2010s nostalgia of how his shows were back then.

This documentary is not the type of giant concert spectacle that people will be talking about for years. Nor is it extraordinary when it comes to the concert’s production theme, set designs, costume design or choreography. However, it’s very enjoyable to watch, especially for people who are inclined to like hip-hop or at least have an appreciation for music with catchy beats. And it’s a good way for people unfamiliar with Chance the Rapper to get a sense of who he is as an artist on stage.

House of Kicks and Park Pictures released “Chance the Rapper’s Magnificent Coloring World” in U.S. cinemas (exclusively in AMC Theatres) on August 13, 2021.

Review: ‘Judas and the Black Messiah,’ starring Daniel Kaluuya and LaKeith Stanfield

February 1, 2021

by Carla Hay

LaKeith Stanfield (in front) and Daniel Kaluuya (in back) in “Judas and the Black Messiah” (Photo by Glenn Wilson/Warner Bros. Pictures)

“Judas and the Black Messiah”

Directed by Shaka King

Culture Representation: Taking place primarily in Chicago in 1968 and 1969, the drama “Judas and the Black Messiah” features a predominately African American cast (with some white people and Latinos) representing people involved in the civil rights movement and law enforcement.

Culture Clash: The Black Panther Party, including Illinois chapter chairman Fred Hampton, was the target of FBI investigations that included hiring an African American paid informant named Bill O’Neal to infiltrate the Black Panther Party to help the FBI bring down Hampton and his colleagues.

Culture Audience: “Judas and the Black Messiah” will appeal primarily to people interested in movies about the civil rights movement for African Americans.

LaKeith Stanfield and Jesse Plemons in “Judas and the Black Messiah” (Photo by Glenn Wilson/Warner Bros. Pictures)

“Judas and the Black Messiah,” which is based on true events, mostly succeeds as presenting a rousing and riveting depiction of a troubling side of the U.S. civil rights movement that is rarely seen as the central plot of a movie: How African Americans were used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation to betray African American civil rights leaders who were labeled as “troublemakers” by the FBI. It’s a necessary and sometimes uncomfortable examination of specific people in the late 1960s history of the civil rights movement, even though “Judas and the Black Messiah” has some awards-bait dramatics that were obviously manufactured for the movie.

Directed by Shaka King (who co-wrote the screenplay with Will Berson), “Judas and the Black Messiah” shows two very different sides of the African American experience with the civil rights movement. On the one side is the urgent activism embodied by Fred Hampton, the chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party. On the other side, is the passive political apathy of William “Bill” O’Neal, a car thief who was lured into betraying the Black Panthers by being a paid confidential informant for the FBI, in exchange for the FBI keeping O’Neal out of prison for his past crimes, such as car theft and impersonating a FBI agent.

“Judas and the Black Messiah,” which takes place primarily in Chicago, is told from perspective of O’Neal (played by LaKeith Stanfield), but Hampton (played by Daniel Kaluuya) is most definitely portrayed as the heroic soul of the movie. In real life, Hampton and O’Neal were in their early 20s when this movie takes place from late 1968 to late 1969. Thankfully, the filmmakers chose “Judas and the Black Messiah” as the movie’s title, instead of the movie’s original and very misleading title “Jesus Was My Homeboy.” Jesus is not a major theme in this movie at all.

The term “black messiah” refers to then-FBI director J. Edgar Hoover’s fear that the civil rights movement would gain momentum under a powerful and charismatic leader. For a while, that leader was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK), until he was brutally assassinated on April 4, 1968. “Judas and the Black Messiah” starts off in late 1968, when the civil rights movement became increasingly fractured by ideological divides between those who wanted to follow MLK’s non-violence philosophy and those such as the Black Panthers, who wanted to follow a more left-wing-leaning “any means necessary” philosophy, even if those means included violence.

Hoover has been depicted in various ways in movies and television, but in “Judas and the Black Messiah,” there’s no doubt that Hoover (played by Martin Sheen, in prosthetic makeup) is the movie’s chief villain. In an early scene in the movie, Hoover is presumably at FBI headquarters as he addresses an auditorium full of FBI agents (all white men, as Hoover reportedly preferred), with an oversized projection screen that looks a little too ahead of its time, as if he’s giving a TED Talk. This is supposed to be 1968, not 2018. It’s one of a few details that don’t ring true in the movie.

During this FBI assembly, Hoover sneers, “The Black Panthers are the single greatest threat to our national security. Our counterintelligence program must prevent the rise of a black messiah among their midst, one with the potential to unite Communists, the anti-war and the new left movements.” A photo of Hampton then appears on the giant projection screen, to make it clear that Hampton is now one of the FBI’s main targets.

Meanwhile, O’Neal is shown being a small-time car thief with an unusual method of operation: He impersonates a FBI agent (including having a fake badge) and pretends to arrest someone for having a stolen car. He looks for potential victims, by at least finding out their names and what kind of car they have, so the fake arrest can look real. And he chooses people who are probably into illegal activities and aren’t likely to go to the police when the theft victims find out they’ve been tricked. It’s implied that all of O’Neal’s theft victims are black, since he knows he’d have very little chance of getting away with this FBi impersonation stunt if he tried it on white people.

What usually happens during this fake FBI arrest is that O’Neal gets the handcuffed person’s car keys and steals that person’s car. Except when viewers first see O’Neal in this movie, that plan backfires in a bad way. O’Neal walks into a bar while some men are playing pool and tries to arrest one of them, but this stranger resists being handcuffed. The “arrestee” has a few friends who also try to stop the detainment. They’re all immediately suspicious of this “arrest” and chase after O’Neal in the car.

One of the friends jumps on the car roof with a knife and starts stabbing through the roof and ends up stabbing O’Neal. The injuries aren’t serious, but they’re enough for this car theft to be completely botched. O’Neal barely manages to get away from the angry group when he’s pulled over by police.

The movie then fast-forwards to O’Neal in a meeting with the FBI special agent who will be the one to lure O’Neal into the FBI sting: Roy Mitchell (played by Jesse Plemons), an ambitious smooth talker who asks O’Neal why he impersonated a FBI agent for a car theft. O’Neal replies, “A badge is scarier than a gun.”

Mitchell then asks O’Neal how he felt about the assassinations of MLK and Malcolm X. O’Neal replies that he was a “little bit” upset over MLK’s murder and he didn’t give much thought to Malcolm X’s murder. It’s at this point that Mitchell knows that O’Neal doesn’t care much about politics or the civil rights movement, and therefore O’Neal can be easily manipulated into being an informant.

First, Mitchell says that the only way that O’Neal can avoid prison is to work as an informant for the FBI. Whenever O’Neal starts to express doubts about being an informant (and this happens several times throughout the story), Mitchell tells O’Neal that the Black Panthers aren’t much different from the Ku Klux Klan, because Mitchell says both are radical, unpatriotic groups that want to divide people by their races and overthrow the U.S. government.

It doesn’t take long for O’Neal to infiltrate the Black Panther Party in Chicago and gain the trust of Hampton, who makes O’Neal the head of security. Hampton is a smart and magnetic leader who is respected by other party members because he often shows through words and deeds that the cause he’s fighting for isn’t about his ego but is about the people and future generations. Unlike other Black Power leaders, who wanted to keep black people separate from people of other races, Hampton embraced alliances with like-minded people of other races.

Hampton is credited with creating the Rainbow Coalition in 1969, which aimed to unite other anti-establishment groups for shared causes. It was a concept that was met with some resistance from the separatist Black Panthers, but because this is a movie, the Rainbow Coalition’s origins are a little too oversimplified and streamlined. One minute, Hampton and some other Black Panthers are showing up uninvited to meetings by the Young Patriots (a group of working-class white people) and the Young Lords (a group of Puerto Ricans) and making themselves known as unexpected allies. The next minute, Hampton is leading a Rainbow Coalition rally with members of the Black Panthers, the Young Patriots and the Young Lords in attendance.

The movie also shows how Hampton spearheaded the alignment of the Black Panthers with a Chicago-based African American gang called the Crowns, in order for the Black Panthers to have access to weapons and armed security backup. And what do you know, one of the Crowns just happens to be someone who was in that group that chased after O’Neal in that botched car theft. There’s a very “movie moment” when O’Neal is sure this guy is going to remember him, thereby making O’Neal more paranoid that his cover will be blown.

Some of the other Black Panther Party members who are featured in the movie include Jimmy Palmer (played by Ashton Sanders), Jake Winters (played by Algee Smith), Judy Harmon (played by Dominique Thorn) and Deborah Johnson (played by Dominique Fishback), a wide-eyed student who is in awe of Hampton and ends up becoming his girlfriend. In real life, Johnson is now known as Akua Njeri, and she gave birth to Fred Hampton Jr. in December 1969. Njeri and Hampton Jr. both were consultants on “Judas and the Black Messiah.”

Of course, in any movie that involves spying, there are double crosses and constant questions about loyalty, honesty and who can be trusted. The movie ramps up the tension not only outside the Black Panther Party but also within it. “Judas and the Black Messiah” also raises thought-provoking questions that will make people wonder about the prices that people pay for freedom, however freedom might be defined by individuals. And when there are informants or spies who are paid to betray, to what extent should they be branded as the “enemy”?

“Judas and the Black Messiah” has undoubtedly powerful performances by Kaluuya as Hampton and Stanfield as O’Neal. Kaluuya has the flashier role that will get more attention, mainly because there’s no ambiguity about his purpose in the film: depicting Hampton as a civil rights hero. In the few times Hampton was depicted in scripted projects before “Judas and the Black Messiah” was made, Hampton was usually a marginal character who didn’t have much depth, such as in the Netflix 2020 movie “The Trial of the Chicago 7.”

In “Judas and the Black Messiah,” Hampton is a larger-than-life personality who gets the big speeches, the leadership position at rallies, and the martyrdom when he lands in prison at the height of his power. Hampton’s biggest showcase speech scene comes after he’s released from prison and gets a hero’s welcome during a Black Panther rally in Chicago. After leading the crowd to chant, “I am a revolutionary!” several times in the speech, he declares poetically: “You can murder a liberator, but you can’t murder liberation! You can murder a revolutionary, but you can’t murder a revolution! You can murder a freedom fighter, but you can’t murder freedom!”

Stanfield has the more difficult and nuanced role as the conflicted and duplicitous O’Neal. On the one hand, O’Neal knows he’s a traitor. On the other hand, O’Neal is portrayed as someone who genuinely became friends with many people in the Black Panther Party, but he felt powerless to stop the informant deal that he made with the FBI. There are times when O’Neal shows so much loyalty to the Black Panthers that FBI agent Mitchell doubts whose side O’Neal is really on.

“Judas and the Black Messiah” doesn’t let O’Neal completely off the hook for his betrayal, but the movie gives the impression that his decisions were not about the money but about his fear of going to prison if he didn’t comply with what the FBI wanted. In real life, O’Neal gave only one TV interview about his Black Panther/FBI informant experience. It was in 1989, in an interview for the PBS show “Eyes on the Prize 2,” which aired the interview on January 15, 1990. Clips of this interview are recreated in the movie.

The performances in “Judas and the Black Messiah” are impactful and deserving of high praise. Where the movie falters is in some of the scenarios depicting the interactions between O’Neal and his FBI contact Mitchell. In the movie, Mitchell deliberately kept O’Neal’s identity a secret from most his FBI colleagues. (Hoover knew though.) Therefore, it doesn’t make sense that the movie shows O’Neal and Mitchell openly meeting several times in upscale restaurants, where O’Neal is obviously the only black person there as a dining patron. It wouldn’t have been hard for the movie’s screenwriters to keep all of the meetings between O’Neal and Mitchell in less public places.

O’Neal’s wardrobe gets a little more stylish as he starts to make more money from the FBI. But in the beginning, O’Neal definitely stands out in these restaurants because he’s dressed inappropriately (too casual) for these kinds of dining establishments. If you were to believe this movie, in 1969 Chicago, a black man in “street clothes” can walk into an upscale restaurant where all the other patrons are white, sit down, have dinner with a white man in a suit, and no one notices, stares or questions why this inappropriately dressed black man is there. Things like that would’ve definitely gotten noticed in the real world. And this scenario is not exactly O’Neal and Mitchell keeping their relationship undercover or incognito.

Another “only in a movie” contrivance is in a scene where a despondent O’Neal ends up in a bar, where a woman shows a romantic interest in him after she rejects a fur-coat-wearing motormouth at a nearby barstool. The rejected man (played by Lil Rel Howery), who is identified only as Wayne in the movie’s end credits, is a stranger to O’Neal, but Wayne drops hints that he knows that O’Neal is working for the FBI.

O’Neal, who is already feeling very uneasy, follows Wayne out to Wayne’s car and demands to know who he is. The movie, with anxiety-filled music building to a crescendo, then has Wayne reveal something that’s meant to shock O’Neal and the audience. It’s highly doubtful this confrontation ever happened in real life, but fans of the Oscar-winning 2017 horror movie “Get Out” will be happy to see “Get Out” co-stars Kaluuya, Stanfield and Howery reunited as cast members for “Judas and the Black Messiah.”

As the only women with significant speaking roles in the movie, Fishback (as Hampton’s girlfriend Johnson) and Thorne (as Black Panther member Harmon) show considerable talent, although this is definitely a male-dominated film. Johnson’s character evolves from being a star-stuck fangirl of Hampton to being a loyal romantic partner to being a strong-willed expectant mother, who can’t help but feel impending heartbreak and doom when she hears Hampton give a speech saying that he will probably die for his people. Thorne’s Harmon is a badass who can get down and dirty in fight scenes just like the men do, such as in a tension-filled shootout between the Chicago Police Department and the Black Panthers.

The flaws in the movie’s screenplay are outweighed by the significant talent of the cast members and the ability of director King to maintain a suspenseful edge. Even though many people watching this movie might already know what happened to Hampton and O’Neal in real life, “Judas and the Black Messiah” triumphs in capturing the essence of this era of the civil rights movement in America. There might be fabricated “only in a movie” moments, but the film authentically conveys the passion and necessity for civil rights.

Warner Bros. Pictures will release “Judas and the Black Messiah” in U.S. cinemas and on HBO Max on February 12, 2021.

Review: ‘The Thing About Harry,’ starring Jake Borelli and Niko Terho

February 14, 2020

by Carla Hay

Niko Terho and Jake Borelli in “The Thing About Harry” (Photo by Parrish Lewis/Freeform)

“The Thing About Harry”

Directed by Peter Paige

Culture Representation: Taking place primarily in Chicago with a predominantly white cast, the romantic comedy “The Thing About Harry” is about two young middle-class men (one who’s openly gay, and the other who’s openly pansexual) who were enemies in high school but start to fall in love with each other, even as they date other people.

Culture Clash: Because one of the men is a commitment-phobic playboy who dates men and women, it causes conflicts over whether or not he’s a suitable partner for the other guy, who wants a long-term, monogamous relationship.

Culture Audience: This movie will appeal mostly to fans of romantic comedies who are open-minded enough to seeing diverse sexualities portrayed on screen.

Jake Borelli and Niko Terho in “The Thing About Harry” (Photo by Parrish Lewis/Freeform)

The romantic comedy “The Thing About Harry,” Freeform’s first Valentine’s Day-themed original movie, puts a queer spin on a story that is very much inspired by the 1989 classic Meg Ryan/Billy Crystal movie “When Harry Met Sally.” In “The Thing About Harry,” two male friends who are obviously sexually attracted to each other try to keep their relationship platonic because one of the pals thinks that falling in love with a good friend is a recipe for disaster. This made-for-TV movie isn’t going to win any Emmys, but it’s a hilarious and sometimes emotionally touching ride that should please fans of romantic comedies.

“The Thing About Harry,” which takes place in Chicago over an approximate five-year period, begins with smart but neurotic Sam Biselli (played by Jake Borelli) an openly gay college student cuddling in bed with his straight female best friend Anatsasia “Stasia” Hooper (played by Britt Barron), a purple-haired sassy free spirit who’s a major commitment-phobe when it comes to dating. While cuddling with Stasia, Sam gets a call from two friends he knew in high school—a straight couple named Chris and Kelly, who ask Sam to attend their engagement party in their mutual hometown of Liberty, Missouri.

Sam says yes, and he plans to road trip to the party in his car. Chris and Kelly then ask Sam to do them a big favor: Give a ride to their friend and former high-school classmate Harry Turpin (played by Niko Tero), who doesn’t have a car. Sam and Harry attend the same college, but they’re not exactly friends. Sam has been openly gay since high school, and popular athlete Harry used to bully him mercilessly because of Sam’s sexuality and because Sam was the type of nerdy kid in school who was a know-it-all teacher’s pet. Sam had the unflattering nickname “Suck-up Sammy” in high school, and Harry was one of the classmates who taunted him with that name.

As far as Sam is concerned, Harry is one of the last people he wants to be stuck with on a road trip, but Sam is such a nice guy that he can’t say no to Chris and Kelly, and he reluctantly agrees to give Sam a ride to the party. Stasia, who has been Sam’s best friend since they met on their first day of college, doesn’t mince words when she tells Sam what she thinks about his decision to spend time with Harry: “You, my friend, are a medical marvel. It’s a wonder you can stand with a spine like that.”

Sam is the type of person who’s a romantic at heart. He believes in monogamy and that a partner should be mindful of things such as a three-month anniversary. It’s one of the reasons why he’s no longer with his ex-boyfriend Malcolm, who cheated on him and definitely was not the type of person who would remember anniversaries. Sam and Malcolm started off as close friends, but as a result of the breakup, Sam has sworn off ever dating someone who’s starts off as a close friend.

When Sam arrives at the arranged meeting place on campus to pick up Harry for the road trip, Harry is almost a half-hour late. Their meeting is somewhat awkward because Sam is very mistrustful of Harry and extremely annoyed at Harry’s tardiness. Harry offers a flippant apology and rambles on that he’s been preoccupied with some of the people he’s been dating, and he’s broken up with his most recent girlfriend. Sam doesn’t seem too surprised, since Harry was a playboy in high school too.

Sam asks Harry if he remembers how much of a hard time he gave Sam in high school. Harry, like a lot of school bullies who’ve grown up, doesn’t remember being as harsh on Sam as Sam remembers it. But Sam reminds him how much Harry’s behavior was mean-spirited and hurtful. Harry is a little taken aback, but then Harry mentions that he has an ex-boyfriend, which leads to Harry telling Sam that he’s pansexual—someone who’s attracted to people of all sexualities and genders.

This time, it’s Sam’s turn to be surprised, since he thought that from the way Harry acted in high school, Harry must be heterosexual. Sam is so shocked that he nearly runs into a truck on the other side of the road. They have a minor car accident when the car swerves into an embankment and has to be towed away for repairs.

While they’re waiting for Sam’s car to fixed, Sam and Harry share a motel room, where Harry confesses to Sam that the reason why he bullied Sam was because he was envious that Sam was open about his sexuality. Harry hadn’t come out with his true sexuality back then, and he said that if he acted nice toward Sam in high school, people would think he was queer “by association.”

After Harry’s confession, the two men open up to each other a little more by talking about their favorite things and their life goals. Sam is surprised to learn that despite Harry’s playboy ways and “macho jock” image, he has a sweet and sensitive side: Harry tells Sam that his favorite movie is “Up” and that his biggest life goal is to become a father. By contrast, Sam says he’s not sure if he wants to bring kids into this world. Later, Harry gives a sincere apology to Sam for being a bully to him in high school.

With Sam’s car back in commission, they continue on the road trip, but Harry ends up ditching him in the middle of the trip to meet up with his most recent ex-girlfriend because they’ve decided to get back together. The engagement party isn’t shown in the movie, but another party is shown that’s a turning point in Sam and Harry’s relationship.

Back in Chicago, not long after the engagement party, Sam and Stasia go to a singles-only Valentine’s Day party. And, of course, Harry happens to be there too. At the party, Harry is wearing an outfit that looks like he just came from a 1992 Kris Kross video: overalls with one of the arm straps unbuttoned. Despite this fashion faux pas, Harry is still the best-looking guy at the party and there’s still a spark of mutual attraction between Sam and Harry.

But talk about bad timing: Harry tells Sam that he’s decided to try being celibate for a while. Sam doesn’t think Harry’s celibacy vow will last, but it makes him feel more comfortable with becoming friends with Harry. Stasia meets Harry for the first time at this party, and although she’s initially suspicious of him, she eventually accepts him when she sees that Sam has forgiven Harry and that they’ve decided to be friends.

The rest of the movie is a “will they or won’t they” guessing game on whether or not Sam and Harry will ever reveal their true feelings for each other while they date other people. “Queer Eye” co-star Karamo Brown has a memorable cameo as a pretentious art dealer named Paul, who dates Sam. In a genuinely funny scene where Sam and Paul join a group of friends at a local bar’s trivia night, Paul shows his true petty nature and Harry surprises everyone with how much trivia he knows. The message is clear: Harry’s not such a dumb jock after all.

Sam and Harry each have platonic male roommates who offer their advice and observations. Sam’s roommate is a middle-aged gay man named Casey (played by former “Queer as Folk” co-star Peter Paige, who directed this movie), who’s like a caring older brother to Sam. Harry’s roommate is a straight guy close to his age named Zack (played by Japhet Balaban), who frequently joins Harry, Sam and Stasia for their friend get-togethers.

Before and after he graduates from college, Sam shows an interest in progressive liberal politics, and he starts his career as a community organizer for a mayoral candidate. Meanwhile, Harry (who’s a marketing major) flounders around after college in low-paying entry-level jobs, such as a sales associate at a clothing store or selling phones at a kiosk.

One of the reasons why Sam is attracted to Harry is that he’s not just another pretty face. Harry is a lot smarter than people assume that he is (although he’s still not as smart as Sam), and he’s a fun and loyal friend. Harry also gets involved with issues that Sam cares deeply about, such as LGBTQ rights. When Sam and Harry go to a party after a Pride parade, something happens at the party that changes the course of their relationship.

“The Thing About Harry,” which was written by director Paige and Joshua Senter, has some unpredictable twists as well as some formulaic aspects to the story. The movie’s biggest appeal is in how realistically the characters are written and portrayed. The whip-smart dialogue of Sam, Stasia and Casey will remind viewers of people they know who can give sassy and sensible romance advice all day to friends, but their own love lives are kind of a mess. And because Harry is a very handsome and commitment-phobic playboy, he has that realistic mix of being charming and frustrating, which are common traits for people who know they have their pick of partners who are competing to fall in love with them.

If Sam and Harry are secretly in love with each other, what’s holding them back? Sam doesn’t want to get his heart broken by Harry, who doesn’t have a great track record when it comes to monogamy and long-term relationships. Harry doesn’t want to fall short of Sam’s high expectations when it comes to romance, and he probably feels that Sam deserves to have a partner who’s on a similar intellectual level.

Despite their differences, Sam and Harry are easy to root for in his love story. The whole point of this movie is to show that when it comes to love, there’s no explaining a lot of attractions. Instead of seeing if a potential love partner fits a list of requirements, many times it’s just best to just go with what feels right if it doesn’t hurt anyone and it makes you happy.

Freeform will premiere “The Thing About Harry” at 8 p.m. ET/PT on February 15, 2020.

2019 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade: Celine Dion, Jimmy Fallon, The Roots added to lineup

November 13, 2019

The following is a press release from NBC:

A spectacle like no other awaits millions as the 93rd annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade®, the nation’s most cherished holiday tradition, once again kicks off the holiday season. Millions of families will tune in to watch the excitement unfold on Thursday, Nov. 28 as Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb and Al Roker of NBC News’ “TODAY” host the broadcast from 9 a.m.-noon in all time zones that will also include a special debut performance from her new album Courage by the incomparable Celine Dion.

The Macy’s Parade has must-see entertainment for everyone in the family. Joining the festivities will be stars from a variety of global music genres from pop, R&B and country to Latin and K-Pop, with a few noteworthy special appearances thrown in the mix. Appearing or performing onboard one of Macy’s signature floating stages will be Natasha Bedingfield, Black Eyed Peas, Chicago, Ciara, Josh Dela Cruz, Celine Dion, Jimmy Fallon and The Roots, Debbie Gibson, former NASA astronauts Kay Hire & Janet Kavandi, Chris Janson, Idina Menzel, Lea Michele, Miss America 2019 Nia Franklin, NHL legends Dominic Moore and Eddie Olczyk, the cast & Muppets of Sesame Street, NCT 127, Ozuna, Billy Porter, Kelly Rowland, That Girl Lay Lay, TLC, Tenille Townes and Chris Young; with an extra special appearance by the one-and-only Santa Claus.

To kick-off the revelry, a special must-see opening number featuring a who’s who of actors, singers, dancers and more, all joined by the cast and Muppets of Sesame Street, will start the Thanksgiving Day party with a smash.

Following the opener on 34th Street, Broadway’s best shows will take a star turn in front of Macy’s famed flagship with special performances from the casts of Ain’t Too Proud – The Life and Times of The Temptations, Beetlejuice, Hadestown and Tina – The Tina Turner Musical. In addition, the show-stopping Radio City Rockettes® will bring their signature high-kicking magic to Herald Square.

Since November 1924, the magic of the holiday season has begun with the march of the Macy’s Parade as it enthrals the nation with its signature mix of whimsical elements and special performances. For the 93rd edition, the line-up will feature 16 giant character balloons; 40 novelty balloons, heritage balloons, balloonicles, balloonheads and trycaloons; 26 floats; 1,200 cheerleaders and dancers; more than 1,000 clowns; and 11 marching bands.

“We are thrilled to present the 93rd edition of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to our viewers nationwide,” said Doug Vaughan, Executive Vice President, Special Programs, NBC Entertainment. “This iconic tradition will once again jump start the holiday season with a celebration led by an incredible lineup of performers, bands, floats, balloons and more.”

For the fourth year, Macy’s, along with NBCUniversal and Verizon, will give viewers an up close and personal second screen experience of the Parade with a 360-degree livestream on Verizon’s YouTube page. The stream will go live at 8:30 a.m. EST at www.youtube.com/verizon and will run through noon EST. With exclusive access to cameras along the entire Parade route, online spectators will get a glimpse of the magic behind the scenes, as well as a preview of what’s to come as the Parade marches down the streets of Manhattan. Additional information on the livestream to be announced soon.

New giant balloons joining the line-up this year include Astronaut Snoopy by Peanuts Worldwide, Green Eggs and Ham by Netflix, and SpongeBob SquarePants & Gary by Nickelodeon. In celebration of his 75thbirthday, a heritage balloon and fan-favorite will return to the Parade as Smokey Bear returns to the skies over Manhattan.

Since 2005, the Macy’s Parade has also been home to a collection of high-flying artworks created in collaboration with renowned contemporary artists, as part of a special series titled Macy’s Blue Sky Gallery. This year, for the eighth edition of the collection, the world’s most renowned female contemporary artist will take her iconic art to new heights as Yayoi Kusama joins the Macy’s Parade with her Love Flies Up to the Sky balloon creation. The balloon design was developed by the artist from face motifs that appear in her “My Eternal Soul” series of paintings — a body of work that she began in 2009. Vibrant and animated, the paintings embody Kusama’s innovative exploration of form and revolve around a tension between abstraction and figuration. The artist’s signature dots, which recur throughout her practice, also feature prominently in the Macy’s Parade balloon design. Previous balloons in the Macy’s Parade Blue Sky Gallery series have included works from famed artists Tom Otterness, Jeff Koons, Keith Haring, Takashi Murakami, Tim Burton, KAWS and FriendsWithYou.

This year five new floats will debut, including Nickelodeon’s Blue’s Clues & You! (Josh Dela Cruz), The Brick-changer by The Lego Group (NCT 127), Home Sweet Home by Cracker Barrel Old Country Store® (Tenille Townes), Rexy in the City by COACH® (Billy Porter), and Toy House of Marvelous Milestones by New York Life (Kelly Rowland).

The nation’s best marching bands bring the beat to the holiday revelry. For this year’s 93rd march, 11 of the specially chosen ensembles will ignite coast-to-coast excitement and hometown pride as they step off and perform on the streets of the Big Apple. This year’s bands include Awesome Original Second Time Arounders Marching Band (St. Petersburg, FL), Blue Springs High School Golden Regiment (Blue Springs, MO), Catalina Foothills Falcon Band (Tucson, AZ), Franklin Regional Panther Band (Murrysville, PA), Macy’s Great American Marching Band (United States), Madison Central High School Band (Richmond, KY), Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. High School’s Kings of Halftime (Lithonia, GA), Morgan State University’s The Magnificent Marching Machine (Baltimore, MD), NYPD Marching Band (New York, NY), Ronald Reagan High School Marching Band (San Antonio, TX) and Western Carolina University’s Pride of the Mountains Marching Band (Cullowhee, NC).

Entertaining the crowds with their signature exuberance will be the Parade’s signature large and specialty performance groups. Joining the line-up this year are the teen dancers and cheerleaders of Spirit of America Dance Stars and Spirit of America Cheer. These groups together feature more than 1,200 of the very best performers recruited from hometowns nationwide. Days before Thanksgiving, they will gather for the first time in New York City to rehearse their numbers as a group, ahead of their once-in-a-lifetime national spotlight. Adding some wacky 1980s style dancing will be the hilarious 610 Stompers (New Orleans, LA), with modern dance youth talent showcased by The Alvin Ailey School (New York, NY) and the tap dance theatrics of children from The Nice List (New York, NY). Rounding out the performance group line-up and joining select talent performances will be Gamma Phi Circus (Normal, IL), Manhattan Youth Ballet (New York, NY), the dance stars of the world-renowned in-school arts education program National Dance Institute (New York, NY) and Young People’s Chorus of NYC (New York, NY).

PLEASE NOTE: All talent, performers, elements and information included are subject to change.

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade broadcast is produced by the Emmy Award-winning Brad Lachman Productions. Brad Lachman serves as executive producer, Bill Bracken will co-executive produce and Ron de Moraes directs.

For an insider’s look at the holiday procession, fans nationwide should visit macys.com/parade for regular updates including behind-the-scenes previews, special tours, interactive historical information, and more. Fans can also follow @macys on various social networks and join the conversation using #MacysParade.

2019 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade: major floats, celebrity appearances announced

November 1, 2019

The following is a press release from NBC:

A spectacle like no other awaits millions, as the 93rd Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade®, the nation’s most cherished holiday tradition, kicks off the holiday season. On Thursday, November 28 at 9 a.m., the time honored phrase Let’s Have a Parade™ will ring from the starting line as the march of fantasy takes to the streets of New York City. With more than 8,000 volunteers dressed as clowns, guiding the flight of larger-than-life character balloons, transporting spectators to new worlds on signature floats, bringing the beat in the nation’s best marching bands and entertaining the crowds as part of dazzling performance groups, the annual march is jam-packed with entertainment. With more than 3.5 million spectators in New York City and more than 50 million television viewers nationwide, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is America’s premiere holiday celebration.

“Spectacle is synonymous with the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and each year we aim to create an even bigger one than the last, with incredible must-see entertainment for millions of spectators nationwide,” said Susan Tercero, executive producer of Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. “Featuring an amazing line-up of high-flying character balloons, jaw-dropping animated floats, world-class marching bands and performance groups, artists covering a variety of musical genres, and of course, the one-and-only Santa Claus, we are ‘Parade Ready’ and can’t wait to take to the streets of New York City to once again herald the arrival of the holiday season.”

For more than nine decades, the magic of the holiday season has begun with the march of the Macy’s Parade, as the spectacle enthrals the nation with its signature mix of whimsical elements and dazzling performances. For the 93rd edition, the line-up will feature 16 giant character balloons; 40 novelty balloons, heritage balloons, balloonicles, balloonheads and trycaloons; 26 floats; 1,200 cheerleaders and dancers; more than 1,000 clowns; and 11 marching bands.

INFLATABLE ICONS
Since 1927, when the Parade’s character balloons first joined the revelry, the inflatables have become a signature element featuring some of the world’s most beloved characters. Over time, the inflatables have morphed from air-filled characters carried on sticks to high-flying giants, balloonheads and even hybrid inflatables with vehicles inside (balloonicles) or tandem tricycles (trycaloons).

New giants joining the line-up this year include Astronaut Snoopy by Peanuts Worldwide, Green Eggs and Ham by Netflix, and SpongeBob SquarePants & Gary by Nickelodeon. In celebration of his 75th birthday, a heritage balloon and fan favorite will return to the Parade as Smokey Bear once again takes to the skies over Manhattan.

In 2005, the Macy’s Parade began to feature what would become a collection of high-flying artwork created in collaboration with renowned contemporary artists. The special series, entitled Macy’s Blue Sky Gallery, has featured some of the art world’s finest creators. This year, for the eighth edition of the series, the world’s most renowned female contemporary artist will take her iconic art to new heights as Yayoi Kusama joins the Macy’s Parade with her Love Flies Up to the Sky balloon. The design was developed by the artist from face motifs that appear in her “My Eternal Soul” series of paintings–a body of work that she began in 2009. Vibrant and animated, the paintings embody Kusama’s innovative exploration of form and revolve around a tension between abstraction and figuration. The artist’s signature dots–which recur throughout her practice—are also featured prominently in the Macy’s Parade balloon design. Previous balloons in the Macy’s Parade Blue Sky Gallery series have included works from famed artists Tom Otterness, Jeff Koons, Keith Haring, Takashi Murakami, Tim Burton, KAWS, and FriendsWithYou™.

Returning giant balloon characters include Diary of A Wimpy Kid® by Abrams Children’s Books; Sinclair Oil’s DINO®; The Elf on the Shelf®; Goku; Illumination Presents Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch; Jett by Super Wings™; Olaf from Disney’s “Frozen 2”; Chase from PAW Patrol®; Pikachu™ by the Pokémon Company International; Pillsbury Doughboy™; Power Rangers Mighty Morphin Red Ranger; Ronald McDonald®; and Trolls. Completing the inflatable lineup is the famed Aflac Duck, Sinclair Oil’s Baby DINOs and the Go Bowling balloonicles, as well as Universal Orlando Resort’s The Nutcracker.

STARS ON PARADE
The Macy’s Parade has must-see entertainment for everyone in the family. Joining the festivities will be stars from a variety of global music genres including Pop, R&B, Country, Latin and K-Pop, with a few noteworthy special appearances thrown in the mix. Appearing or performing onboard one of Macy’s signature floating stages will be Natasha Bedingfield, Black Eyed Peas, Chicago, Ciara, Josh Dela Cruz, Debbie Gibson, former NASA Astronauts Kay Hire & Janet Kavandi, Chris Janson, Idina Menzel, Lea Michele, Miss America 2019 Nia Franklin, NHL® Legends Dominic Moore and Eddie Olczyk, the cast & Muppets of Sesame Street, NCT 127, Ozuna, Billy Porter, Kelly Rowland, That Girl Lay Lay, TLC, Tenille Townes, and Chris Young; with an extra special appearance by the one-and-only Santa Claus.

FLOATING WONDERS
Conceived and crafted by the incredible artisans of Macy’s Parade Studio – a design and production facility that includes carpenters, engineers, electricians, painters, animators, sculptors, metal fabricators, scenic and costume designers – this year’s line-up of floats sets an unparalleled stage for entertainment. Gliding down Manhattan, the Parade’s signature floats transport spectators to worlds of wonder through creative design, engineering, and skillful construction. While they may seem to float down the Parade route as three stories tall and several lanes of traffic wide stages, the magic is truly in the design as these floats are built to collapse to no more than 12 ½-feet tall and 8-feet wide in order to travel safely from the New Jersey home of the Parade Studio to the Manhattan starting line via the Lincoln Tunnel each Thanksgiving eve.

This year, five new floats will debut including Nickelodeon’s Blue’s Clues & You! (Josh Dela Cruz), The Brick-changer by The Lego Group (NCT 127), Home Sweet Home by Cracker Barrel Old Country Store® (Tenille Townes), Rexy in the City by COACH® (Billy Porter), and Toy House of Marvelous Milestones by New York Life (Kelly Rowland).

The returning float roster and its scheduled performers and special stars include 1-2-3 Sesame Street® by Sesame Workshop™ (The cast and Muppets of Sesame Street); Big City Cheer! by Spirit of America Productions (Miss America 2019 Nia Franklin); Central Park (Lea Michele); Christmas Cheer is Near by Elf Pets®/The Elf on the Shelf®; Cornucopia; Deck the Halls by Balsam Hill® (Idina Menzel); Everyone’s Favorite Bake Shop by Entenmann’s®; Fantasy Chocolate Factory by Kinder™ (Natasha Bedingfield), Harvest in the Valley by Green Giant® (Chris Janson); Heartwarming Holiday Countdown by Hallmark Channel (Chicago); Mount Rushmore’s American Pride by South Dakota Department of Tourism (Chris Young); the NHL® Most Valuable Hockey Mom presented by MassMutual (Black Eyed Peas and NHL® Legends Dominic Moore and Eddie Olczyk); Parade Day Mischief by SOUR PATCH KIDS® Candy (Ozuna); Rise of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles by Nickelodeon (Ciara); Santa’s Sleigh (Santa Claus); Shimmer and Shine by Nickelodeon (Debbie Gibson); Snoopy’s Doghouse by Peanuts Worldwide (Charlie Brown and former NASA Astronauts Kay Hire and Janet Kavandi); Splashing Safari Adventure by Kalahari Resorts and Conventions (TLC); Tom Turkey; and Universal Playground by Universal Kids (That Girl Lay Lay).

Returning for a third year by popular demand, the Macy’s Singing Christmas Tree by Delta Air Lines will feature the harmonious voices of more than 100 Macy’s colleagues and friends from Delta hailing from across the nation and the world. Performing an original song to celebrate the start of the holiday season, the golden-voiced chorus will touch the hearts and uplift the spirits of millions.

STRIKE UP THE BAND AND DANCE
The nation’s best marching bands bring the beat to the holiday revelry. For this year’s 93rd march, 11 of the specially chosen ensembles will ignite coast-to-coast excitement and hometown pride as they step off and perform on the streets of the Big Apple. This year’s bands include Awesome Original Second Time Arounders Marching Band (St. Petersburg, FL), Blue Springs High School Golden Regiment (Blue Springs, MO), Catalina Foothills Falcon Band (Tucson, AZ), Franklin Regional Panther Band (Murrysville, PA), Macy’s Great American Marching Band (United States), Madison Central High School Band (Richmond, KY), Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. High School’s Kings of Halftime (Lithonia, GA), Morgan State University’s The Magnificent Marching Machine (Baltimore, MD), NYPD Marching Band (New York, NY), Ronald Reagan High School Marching Band (San Antonio, TX), and Western Carolina University’s Pride of the Mountains Marching Band (Cullowhee, NC).

Entertaining the crowds with their signature exuberance will be the Parade’s signature large and specialty performance groups. Joining the line-up this year are the teen dancers and cheerleaders of Spirit of America Dance Stars and Spirit of America Cheer. These groups together feature more than 1,200 of the very best performers recruited from hometowns nationwide. Days before Thanksgiving, they will gather for the first time in New York City to rehearse their numbers as a group, ahead of their once-in-a-lifetime national spotlight. Adding some wacky 1980s style dancing will be the hilarious 610 Stompers (New Orleans, LA), with modern dance youth talent showcased by The Alvin Ailey School (New York, NY) and the tap dance theatrics of children from The Nice List (New York, NY). Rounding out the performance group line-up and joining select talent performances will be Gamma Phi Circus (Normal, IL), Manhattan Youth Ballet (New York, NY), the dance stars of the world-renowned in-school arts education program National Dance Institute (New York, NY) and Young People’s Chorus of NYC (New York, NY).

A NATIONAL SPECTACLE
The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is the nation’s biggest and most anticipated holiday celebration. Broadcast nationally on NBC, with millions of families nationwide tuning in to watch the excitement unfold,  the TODAY Show’s Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb and Al Roker will host the three-hour broadcast from 9 a.m. – noon (in all time zones).

To kick off the revelry, a special must-see opening number featuring a who’s who of actors, singers, dancers and more, all joined by the cast and Muppets of Sesame Street, will start the Thanksgiving Day party with a smash.

Following the opener, on 34th Street, Broadway’s best shows will take a star turn in front of Macy’s famed flagship with special performances.  In addition, the show-stopping Radio City Rockettes® will bring their signature high-kicking magic to Herald Square.

360 DEGREE INTERACTIVE FUN
For the fourth year, Macy’s, along with NBCUniversal and Verizon, will give viewers an up close and personal second screen experience of the Parade with a 360-degree livestream on Verizon’s YouTube page.  The stream will go live at 8:30 a.m. EST at www.youtube.com/verizon and will run through noon EST. With exclusive access to cameras along the entire Parade route, online spectators will get a glimpse of the magic behind the scenes, as well as a preview of what’s to come as the Parade marches down the streets of Manhattan.

For spectators in New York or those traveling to the city to see it live, the 93rd Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade begins at 9 a.m., kicking off from 77th Street and Central Park West. The procession will march to Columbus Circle, turn onto Central Park South and then march down 6th Avenue/Avenue of the Americas. At 34th Street, the Parade will make its final turn west and end at 7th Avenue in front of Macy’s Herald Square.

For an insider’s look at the holiday procession, fans nationwide should visit macys.com/parade or regular updates including behind-the-scenes previews, special tours, interactive historical information, and more.  Fans can also follow @macys on various social networks and join the conversation using #MacysParade.

This Thanksgiving, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will bring millions of spectators a dazzling celebration like no other. Start the countdown, in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 … Let’s Have a Parade!

Delta Air Lines is the official airline of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.
Hilton is the official hotel of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.
Ram is the official truck of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.
Remo is the official drumhead provider of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.
Under Armour is the official outerwear provider of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Marvel Studios launches We Love You 3000 tour at Comic-Con International with directors Joe and Anthony Russo

July 19, 2019

Joe Russo and Anthony Russo
Joe Russo and Anthony Russo (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The following is a press release from Marvel Studios:

Marvel Studios’ Avengers: Endgame became Earth’s Mightiest Super Hero franchise this year, and soon fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe will soon be able to own their own copy on Digital (July 30) and Blu-ray (August 13). But even though the curtains have closed on this phase of the MCU, the celebration is far from over. Directors Joe and Anthony Russo are hitting the road for the “We Love You 3000” Tour, a series of in-person events in nine cities throughout the United States where fans will get to express their love for the MCU while the storytellers themselves get to express their gratitude!

The “We Love You 3000” Tour will kick off July 20 at San Diego Comic-Con 2019 with the Russo brothers and some surprise guests from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Fans will be treated to free Ben & Jerry’s ice cream (while supplies last) and fans who come in costume will get the chance to participate in a special Marvel Studios Cosplay photo with the Russos and their special guests!

From there, the tour will go to Seattle, San Francisco, Torrance, Chicago, Miami, Minneapolis, and Cleveland before wrapping up at the D23 Expo in Anaheim on August 25. Every event will be hosted by the Russos and other favorites from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Each event will have something different to offer Marvel fans including photo ops, in-store events at Best Buy Stores, and giveaways of 3,000 MCU Funko Pop Vinyl Figures and the limited edition Avengers: Endgame SteelBook – all as a way for the Marvel Cinematic Universe to express their appreciation to Marvel fans.

Marvel fans made Marvel Studios’ Avengers: Endgame the most successful franchise in film history – now it’s time for the Marvel Cinematic Universe to say thank you!

Here are the dates, times and locations of the We Love You 3000 tour:

(All times listed are in the local time zone. Details are to be announced for start and end times at several of the tour stops.)

San Diego, California
WHEN: July 20, 2019: 1:15 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
WHERE: IMDboat – 5th Avenue Landing Marina, Slip 5B (Directly behind the convention center)

Everett, Washington
WHEN: July 30, 2019: 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.
WHERE: Funko Headquarters

San Francisco, California
WHEN: August 8, 2019
WHERE: Giants Game at Oracle Park

Chicago, Illinois
WHEN: August 12, 2019
WHERE: Best Buy (exact location to be announced)

Torrance, California
WHEN: August 13, 2019
WHERE: Best Buy, 3675 Pacific Coast Highway

Miami, Florida
WHEN: August 13, 2019
WHERE: Best Buy (exact location to be announced)

Minneapolis, Minnesota
WHEN: August 14, 2019
WHERE: Best Buy (exact location to be announced)

Cleveland, Ohio
WHEN: August 20, 2019
WHERE: Best Buy, 7400 Brookpark Road

Anaheim, California
WHEN: August 13, 2019
WHERE: D23 Expo, Anaheim Convention Center, 800 W. Katella Avenue

2019 James Beard Awards: complete list of winners

May 6, 2019

James Beard Awards

The 2019 James Beard Foundation Restaurant and Chef Awards took place May 6 at Lyric Opera of Chicago. The 2019 James Beard Media Awards, which honor those in the media who cover the culinary industry, took place April 26 at Pier Sixty at Chelsea Piers in New York City. The awards were streamed live on Twitter.

Here is the complete list of winners and nominations for the James Beard Foundation Restaurant and Chef Awards.

*=winner

2019 James Beard Foundation Restaurant and Chef Awards

Best New Restaurant
A restaurant opened in the calendar year before the award will be given that already displays excellence in food, beverage, and service, and that is likely to make a significant impact in years to come.

Angler
San Francisco

Atomix
NYC

Bavel
Los Angeles

Frenchette*
NYC

Majordomo
Los Angeles

Outstanding Baker
A pastry chef or baker who demonstrates exceptional skill, integrity, and character in the preparation of desserts, pastries, or breads served in a retail bakery. Must have been working as a pastry chef or baker for the past five years.

Zachary Golper
Bien Cuit
NYC

Maura Kilpatrick
Sofra Bakery and Café
Cambridge, MA

Lisa Ludwinski
Sister Pie
Detroit

Avery Ruzicka
Manresa Bread
Los Gatos, CA

Greg Wade*
Publican Quality Bread
Chicago

Outstanding Bar Program
A restaurant or bar that demonstrates exceptional care and skill in the selection, preparation, and serving of cocktails, spirits, and/or beer.

Bar Agricole*
San Francisco

Dead Rabbit
NYC

Kimball House
Decatur, GA

Lost Lake
Chicago

Ticonderoga Club
Atlanta

Outstanding Chef (Presented by All-Clad Metalcrafters)
A chef who sets high culinary standards and who has served as a positive example for other food professionals. Must have been working as a chef for the past five years.

Ashley Christensen*
Poole’s Diner
Raleigh, NC

David Kinch
Manresa
Los Gatos, CA

Corey Lee
Benu
San Francisco

Donald Link
Herbsaint
New Orleans

Marc Vetri
Vetri Cucina
Philadelphia

Outstanding Pastry Chef (Presented by Lavazza)
A pastry chef or baker who demonstrates exceptional skill, integrity, and character in the preparation of desserts, pastries, or breads served in a restaurant. Must have been working as a pastry chef or baker for the past five years.

Juan Contreras
Atelier Crenn
San Francisco

Kelly Fields*
Willa Jean
New Orleans

Meg Galus
Boka
Chicago

Margarita Manzke
République
Los Angeles

Pichet Ong
Brothers and Sisters
Washington, D.C.

Outstanding Restaurant (Presented by S.Pellegrino® Sparkling Natural Mineral Water)
A restaurant that demonstrates consistent excellence in food, atmosphere, service, and operations. Must have been in business 10 or more consecutive years.

Balthazar
NYC

FIG
Charleston, SC

Jaleo
Washington, D.C.

Quince
San Francisco

Zahav*
Philadelphia

Outstanding Restaurateur (Presented by Magellan Corporation)
A restaurateur who demonstrates creativity in entrepreneurship and integrity in restaurant operations. Must have been in the restaurant business for at least 10 years. Must not have been nominated for a James Beard Foundation chef award in the past five years.

Hugh Acheson
Empire State South, Five & Ten, The National, and others
Atlanta

Kevin Boehm and Rob Katz*
Boka Restaurant Group (Boka, Girl & the Goat, Momotaro, and others)
Chicago

JoAnn Clevenger
Upperline
New Orleans

Ken Oringer
Little Donkey, Toro, Uni, and others
Boston

Alex Raij and Eder Montero
La Vara, Txikito, Saint Julivert Fisherie, and others
NYC

Ellen Yin
High Street Hospitality Group (Fork, High Street on Market, High Street on Hudson)
Philadelphia

Outstanding Service
A restaurant in operation for five or more years that demonstrates consistency and exceptional thoughtfulness in hospitality and service.

Brigtsen’s
New Orleans

Canlis
Seattle

Frasca Food and Wine*
Boulder, CO

Saison
San Francisco

Swan Oyster Depot
San Francisco

Zingerman’s Roadhouse
Ann Arbor, MI

Outstanding Wine Program (Presented by Robert Mondavi Winery)
A restaurant or bar that demonstrates excellence in wine service through a carefully considered wine list and a well-informed approach to helping customers choose and drink wine.

Bacchanal
New Orleans

Benu*
San Francisco

Miller Union
Atlanta

Night + Market
Los Angeles

Spiaggia
Chicago

Outstanding Wine, Spirits, or Beer Producer
A beer, wine, or spirits producer who demonstrates consistency and exceptional skill in his or her craft.

Cathy Corison
Corison Winery
St. Helena, CA

Ann Marshall and Scott Blackwell
High Wire Distilling Co.
Charleston, SC

Steve Matthiasson
Matthiasson Wines
Napa, CA

Rob Tod*
Allagash Brewing Company
Portland, ME

Lance Winters
St. George Spirits
Alameda, CA

Rising Star Chef of the Year (Presented by S.Pellegrino® Sparkling Natural Mineral Water)
A chef age 30 or younger who displays exceptional talent, character, and leadership ability, and who is likely to make a significant impact in years to come.

Ana Castro
Coquette
New Orleans

Alisha Elenz
MFK
Chicago

Alexander Hong
Sorrel
San Francisco

Jesse Ito
Royal Izakaya
Philadelphia

Kwame Onwuachi*
Kith and Kin
Washington, D.C.

Jonathan Yao
Kato
Los Angeles

Best Chefs in America
Chefs who set high culinary standards and also demonstrate integrity and admirable leadership skills in their respective regions. A nominee may be from any kind of dining establishment but must have been working as a chef for at least five years, with the three most recent years spent in the region.

Best Chef: Great Lakes (IL, IN, MI, OH)

Diana Dávila
Mi Tocaya Antojería
Chicago

Jason Hammel
Lula Café
Chicago

Beverly Kim and Johnny Clark*
Parachute
Chicago

David Posey and Anna Posey
Elske
Chicago

Noah Sandoval
Oriole
Chicago

Lee Wolen
Boka
Chicago

Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic (D.C., DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA)

Amy Brandwein
Centrolina
Washington, D.C.

Tom Cunanan*
Bad Saint
Washington, D.C.

Rich Landau
Vedge
Philadelphia

Cristina Martinez
South Philly Barbacoa
Philadelphia

Cindy Wolf
Charleston
Baltimore

Best Chef: Midwest (IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, ND, SD, WI)

Michael Corvino
Corvino Supper Club & Tasting Room
Kansas City, MO

Michael Gallina
Vicia
St. Louis

Ann Kim*
Young Joni
Minneapolis

Jamie Malone
Grand Café
Minneapolis

Christina Nguyen
Hai Hai
Minneapolis

Best Chef: New York City (Five Boroughs)

Sean Gray
Momofuku Ko

Brooks Headley
Superiority Burger

Daniela Soto-Innes
Atla

Alex Stupak
Empellón Midtown

Jody Williams and Rita Sodi*
Via Carota

Best Chef: Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY State, RI, VT)

Tiffani Faison
Tiger Mama
Boston

James Mark
North
Providence

Tony Messina*
Uni
Boston

Cassie Piuma
Sarma
Somerville, MA

Benjamin Sukle
Oberlin
Providence

Best Chef: Northwest (AK, ID, MT, OR, WA, WY)

Peter Cho
Han Oak
Portland, OR

Katy Millard
Coquine
Portland, OR

Brady Williams*
Canlis
Seattle

Justin Woodward
Castagna
Portland, OR

Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi
Joule
Seattle

Best Chef: South (AL, AR, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, FL, LA, MS)

Vishwesh Bhatt*
Snackbar
Oxford, MS

Jose Enrique
Jose Enrique
San Juan, PR

Kristen Essig and Michael Stoltzfus
Coquette
New Orleans

Slade Rushing
Brennan’s
New Orleans

Isaac Toups
Toups’ Meatery
New Orleans

Best Chef: Southeast (GA, KY, NC, SC, TN, WV)

Mashama Bailey*
The Grey
Savannah, GA

Katie Button
Cúrate
Asheville, NC

Cassidee Dabney
The Barn at Blackberry Farm
Walland, TN

Ryan Smith
Staplehouse
Atlanta

Andrew Ticer and Michael Hudman
Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen
Memphis

Best Chef: Southwest (AZ, CO, NM, OK, TX, UT)

Charleen Badman*
FnB
Scottsdale, AZ

Kevin Fink
Emmer & Rye
Austin

Michael Fojtasek
Olamaie
Austin

Bryce Gilmore
Barley Swine
Austin

Steve McHugh
Cured
San Antonio

Best Chef: West (CA, HI, NV)

Michael Cimarusti*
Providence
Los Angeles

Jeremy Fox
Rustic Canyon
Santa Monica, CA

Jessica Koslow
Sqirl
Los Angeles

Travis Lett
Gjelina
Venice, CA

Joshua Skenes
Saison
San Francisco

2019 James Beard Foundation Outstanding Restaurant Design Awards

75 Seats and Under
Firms: Heliotrope Architects and Price Erickson Interior Design
Project: Willmott’s Ghost, Seattle

Firm: Roman and Williams
Project: La Mercerie, NYC

Firm: Studio Writers*
Project: Atomix, NYC*

76 Seats and Over
Firm: Land and Sea Dept.
Project: Lonesome Rose, Chicago

Firm: studio razavi architecture
Project: Boqueria, NYC

Firm: Parts and Labor Design*
Project: Pacific Standard Time, Chicago*

Other Eating and Drinking Places
Firm: AvroKO
Project: China Live, San Francisco

Firm: Schwartz and Architecture (S^A)*
Project: El Pípila, San Francisco*

Firm: Summer Ops
Project: Island Oyster, NYC

Design Icon
Canlis
Seattle

The following previously announced honorees accepted their awards at the James Beard Awards Gala on May 6 at Lyric Opera of Chicago:

2019 James Beard Foundation America’s Classics

(Presented by American Airlines)

Pho 79
Garden Grove, CA
Owners: Tong Trần and Liễu Trần

Jim’s Steak & Spaghetti House
Huntington, WV
Owners: Jimmie Carder, Larry Tweel and Ron Tweel

A&A Bake & Double Roti Shop
Brooklyn, NY
Owners: Noel and Geeta Brown

Sehnert’s Bakery & Bieroc Café
McCook, NE
Owners: Matt and Shelly Sehnert

Annie’s Paramount Steakhouse
Washington, D.C.
Owner: Paul Katinas

2019 James Beard Foundation Humanitarian of the Year

The Giving Kitchen
Non-profit that provides emergency assistance to food service workers through financial support and a network of community resources.

2019 James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award

Patrick O’Connell
Multiple James Beard Award-Winning Chef; Chef & Owner, The Inn at Little Washington in Washington, VA

2019 James Beard Foundation Book Awards

For cookbooks and other non-fiction food- or beverage-related books that were published in the U.S. in 2018. Winners will be announced on April 26, 2019.

American

A Common Table: 80 Recipes and Stories from My Shared Cultures
Cynthia Chen McTernan
(Rodale)

Between Harlem and Heaven: Afro-Asian-American Cooking for Big Nights, Weeknights, and Every Day*
JJ Johnson and Alexander Smalls with Veronica Chambers
(Flatiron Books)

Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking
Albert G. Lukas and Jessica B. Harris
(Smithsonian Books)

Baking and Desserts
Black Girl Baking: Wholesome Recipes Inspired by a Soulful Upbringing
Jerrelle Guy
(Page Street Publishing Co.)

Pie Squared: Irresistibly Easy Sweet & Savory Slab Pies
Cathy Barrow
(Grand Central Publishing)

SUQAR: Desserts & Sweets from the Modern Middle East*
Greg Malouf and Lucy Malouf
(Hardie Grant Books)

Beverage
Apéritif: Cocktail Hour the French Way
Rebekah Peppler
(Clarkson Potter)

The Aviary Cocktail Book
Grant Achatz, Nick Kokonas, Micah Melton, Allen Hemberger, and Sarah Hemberger
(The Alinea Group)

Cocktail Codex
Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, and David Kaplan, with Devon Tarby
(Ten Speed Press)

Wine Folly: Magnum Edition*
Madeline Puckette and Justin Hammack
(Avery)

General
Everyday Dorie
Dorie Greenspan
(Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Milk Street: Tuesday Nights*
Christopher Kimball
(Little, Brown and Company)

Ottolenghi Simple
Yotam Ottolenghi
(Ten Speed Press)

Health and Special Diets
The Complete Diabetes Cookbook
Editors at America’s Test Kitchen
(America’s Test Kitchen)

Eat a Little Better*
Sam Kass
(Clarkson Potter)

More with Less
Jodi Moreno
(Roost Books)

International
Feast: Food of the Islamic World*
Anissa Helou
(Ecco)

The Food of Northern Thailand
Austin Bush
(Clarkson Potter)

I Am a Filipino
Nicole Ponseca and Miguel Trinidad
(Artisan Books)

Photography
Season: Big Flavors, Beautiful Food
Nik Sharma
(Chronicle Books)

Tokyo New Wave*
Andrea Fazzari
(Ten Speed Press)

Wild: Adventure Cookbook
Luisa Brimble
(Prestel Publishing)

Reference, History, and Scholarship
Canned: The Rise and Fall of Consumer Confidence in the American Food Industry*
Anna Zeide
(University of California Press)

Catfish Dream: Ed Scott’s Fight for His Family Farm and Racial Justice in the Mississippi Delta
Julian Rankin
(University of Georgia Press)

Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture
Justin Nystrom
(University of Georgia Press)

Restaurant and Professional
Chicken and Charcoal: Yakitori, Yardbird, Hong Kong*
Matt Abergel
(Phaidon Press)

From the Earth: World’s Great, Rare and Almost Forgotten Vegetables
Peter Gilmore
(Hardie Grant Books)

Rich Table
Evan Rich and Sarah Rich
(Chronicle Books)

Single Subject
Bread & Butter: History, Culture, Recipes
Richard Snapes, Grant Harrington, and Eve Hemingway
(Quadrille Publishing)

Goat: Cooking and Eating*
James Whetlor
(Quadrille Publishing)

Korean BBQ: Master Your Grill in Seven Sauces
Bill Kim with Chandra Ram
(Ten Speed Press)

Vegetable-Focused Cooking
Almonds, Anchovies, and Pancetta: A Vegetarian Cookbook, Kind Of
Cal Peternell
(William Morrow Cookbooks)

Saladish*
Ilene Rosen
(Artisan Books)

Vegetarian Viet Nam
Cameron Stauch
(W. W. Norton & Company)

Writing
Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine*
Edward Lee
(Artisan Books)

Hippie Food: How Back-to-the-Landers, Longhairs, and Revolutionaries Changed the Way We Eat
Jonathan Kauffman
(William Morrow)

Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture
Matt Goulding
(Harper Wave/Anthony Bourdain)

Cookbook Hall of Fame

Jessica B. Harris

2019 James Beard Foundation Broadcast Media Awards

For radio, television broadcasts, podcasts, webcasts, and documentaries appearing in 2018. Winners will be announced on April 26, 2019.

Documentary
Chef Flynn
Airs on: Hulu, iTunes, and YouTube

Funke
Airs on: LA Film Festival and Tastemade

Modified*
Airs on: Film festivals and Vimeo

Online Video, Fixed Location and/or Instructional
Handcrafted – How to Make Handmade Soba Noodles
Airs on: Bon Appétit

Mad Genius – Crispy Cheese Sticks; Waffled Okonomiyaki; and Puff Pastry
Airs on: Food & Wine, YouTube, and Facebook

MasterClass – Dominique Ansel Teaches French Pastry Fundamentals*
Airs on: MasterClass

Online Video, on Location
First We Feast’s Food Skills – Mozzarella Kings of New York*
Airs on: YouTube

Kitchen Unnecessary – Fire Morels
Airs on: YouTube, Facebook

NPR Foraging – Eating Wild Sea Creatures; You Can Eat Dandelions; and The Hunt for Morels
Airs on: NPR

Outstanding Personality
Samin Nosrat
Salt Fat Acid Heat
Airs on: Netflix

Marcus Samuelsson*
No Passport Required
Airs on: PBS

Molly Yeh
Girl Meets Farm
Airs on: Food Network

Outstanding Reporting
Deep Dive and Food for Thought, 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics*
Reporter: David Chang
Airs on: NBC, NBCSN

In Real Life – Why You MUST Try Native American Cuisine
Reporter: Yara Elmjouie
Airs on: YouTube, AJ+

The Sporkful – Yewande Finds Her Super Power
Reporter: Dan Pashman
Airs on: Stitcher

Podcast
Copper & Heat – Be a Girl*
Airs on: Copper & Heat, iTunes, Spotify, and Stitcher

The Feed – Paletas and Other Icy Treats
Airs on: PodcastOne

Racist Sandwich – Erasing Black Barbecue
Airs on: iTunes, Racist Sandwich, and Stitcher

Radio Show
California Foodways – Providing a Taste of Oaxaca to Central Valley; Can Ag and Wildlife Co-Exist? Rice Farmers Think So; and Frozen Burrito Royalty in the Central Valley
Airs on: KQED, California Foodways

The Food Chain – Raw Grief and Widowed*
Airs on: BBC World Service

KCRW’s Good Food – Remembering Jonathan Gold
Airs on: KCRW

Special (on TV or Online)
Anthony Bourdain: Explore Parts Unknown – Little Los Angeles
Airs on: CNN, Explore Parts Unknown, Roads & Kingdoms

Spencer’s BIG Holiday
Airs on: Gusto

Taste Buds – Chefsgiving
Airs on: ABC

Television Program, in Studio or Fixed Location
Barefoot Contessa: Cook Like a Pro – Mary Poppins Show
Airs on: Food Network

Good Eats: Reloaded – Steak Your Claim
Airs on: Cooking Channel

Pati’s Mexican Table – Tijuana: Stories from the Border*
Airs on: WETA Washington; Distributed Nationally by American Public Television

Television Program, on Location
The Migrant Kitchen – Man’oushe
Airs on: KCET and Link TV

Salt Fat Acid Heat – Salt*
Airs on: Netflix

Ugly Delicious – Fried Chicken
Airs on: Netflix

Visual and Technical Excellence
Anthony Bourdain: Explore Parts Unknown*
Sarah Hagey, August Thurmer, and Kate Kunath
Airs on: CNN, Explore Parts Unknown, Roads & Kingdoms

Chef’s Table
Will Basanta, Adam Bricker, and Danny O’Malley
Airs on: Netflix

From The Wild – Season 4
Kevin Kossowan
Airs on: Vimeo

2019 James Beard Foundation Journalism Awards

For articles published in English in 2018.

Columns
America’s Best Worst Cook: “Hi, I’m America’s Best Worst Cook”; “Dear Chefs, Will Eating This Kill Me?” and “How to Roast a Chicken? The Answers Are Horrifying.”
JJ Goode
Taste

Local Fare: “The Question of Dinner”; “Dixie Vodka”; and “Folk Witness”
John T. Edge
Oxford American

What We Talk About When We Talk About American Food: “The Pickled Cucumbers That Survived the 1980s AIDS Epidemic”; “A Second Look at the Tuna Sandwich’s All-American History”; and “Freedom and Borscht for Ukrainian-Jewish Émigrés”*
Mari Uyehara
Taste

Craig Claiborne Distinguished Restaurant Review Award
Counter Intelligence: “The Hearth & Hound, April Bloomfield’s New Los Angeles Restaurant, Is Nothing Like a Gastropub”; “There’s Crocodile and Hog Stomach, but Jonathan Gold Is All About the Crusty Rice at Nature Pagoda”; and “At Middle Eastern Restaurants, It All Starts with Hummus. Jonathan Gold says Bavel’s Is Magnificent”*
Jonathan Gold
Los Angeles Times

“The Fire Gods of Washington, D.C.”; “David Chang’s Majordomo Is No Minor Feat”; and “North America’s Best Cantonese Food Is in Canada”
Bill Addison
Eater

“The Four Seasons Returns. But Can It Come Back?” “Why David Chang Matters”; and “A Celebration of Black Southern Food, at JuneBaby in Seattle”
Pete Wells
The New York Times

Dining and Travel
Chau Down: “A New Orleans Food Diary”; “A Portland Food Diary”; and “A Chicago Food Diary”
Danny Chau
The Ringer

“Dim Sum Is Dead, Long Live Dim Sum”
Max Falkowitz
Airbnb Magazine

“Many Chinas, Many Tables”*
Jonathan Kauffman and Team
San Francisco Chronicle

Feature Reporting
“Big in Japan”
Tejal Rao
The New York Times Magazine

“A Kingdom from Dust”*
Mark Arax
The California Sunday Magazine

“Shell Game: Saving Florida’s Oysters Could Mean Killing a Way of Life”
Laura Reiley and Eve Edelheit
Tampa Bay Times

Food Coverage in a General Interest Publication
New York Magazine*
Robin Raisfeld, Rob Patronite, Maggie Bullock, and the Staff of New York Magazine

Roads & Kingdoms
Nathan Thornburgh, Matt Goulding, Anup Kaphle, and the Roads & Kingdoms Team

T: The New York Times Style Magazine
Kurt Soller, Hanya Yanagihara, and the Staff of T Magazine

Foodways
“Back to Where It All Began: I Had Never Eaten in Ghana Before. But My Ancestors Had.”
Michael W. Twitty
Bon Appétit

“A Hunger for Tomatoes”*
Shane Mitchell
The Bitter Southerner

“What is Northern Food?”
Steve Hoffman
Artful Living

Health and Wellness
“Clean Label’s Dirty Little Secret”*
Nadia Berenstein
The New Food Economy

“The Last Conversation You’ll Ever Need to Have About Eating Right” and “The Last Conversation You’ll Need to Have on Eating Right: The Follow-ups”
Mark Bittman and David L. Katz
New York Magazine / Grub Street

“‘White People Food’ Is Creating An Unattainable Picture Of Health”
Kristen Aiken
HuffPost

Home Cooking
“Melissa Clark’s Thanksgiving”
Melissa Clark
The New York Times

“The Subtle Thrills of Cold Chicken Salad”*
Cathy Erway
Taste

“Top Secret Ingredients”
Kathleen Purvis
Garden & Gun

Innovative Storytelling
“In Search of Water-Boiled Fish”*
Angie Wang
Eater

“100 Most Jewish Foods”
Alana Newhouse, Gabriella Gershenson, and Stephanie Butnick
Tablet Magazine

“What’s in a Food Truck?”
Bonnie Berkowitz, Seth Blanchard, Aaron Steckelberg, and Monica Ulmanu
The Washington Post

Investigative Reporting
“‘It’s Not Fair, Not Right’: How America Treats Its Black Farmers”
Debbie Weingarten and Audra Mulkern
The Guardian and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project

“A Killing Season”*
Boyce Upholt
The New Republic

“Victims Blame FDA for Food-Recall Failures”
Christine Haughney Dare-Bryan
Politico

Jonathan Gold Local Voice Award

“Storied Ovens”; “Food Outside the U.S. Open Gates”; and “A New Destination for Chinese Food: Not Flushing, but Forest Hills”
Max Falkowitz
The New York Times; Plate Magazine

“My Dinner at the Playboy Club”; “Curry and Roti Destination Singh’s Lights Up Queens”; and “Where New Yorkers Actually Eat in Times Square”
Robert Sietsema
Eater NY

“Yes Indeed, Lord: Queen’s Cuisine, Where Everything Comes from the Heart”; “Top 10 New Orleans Restaurants for 2019”; and “Sexual Harassment Allegations Preceded Sucré Co-Founder Tariq Hanna’s Departure”*
Brett Anderson
Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

M.F.K. Fisher Distinguished Writing Award
“A Kingdom from Dust”
Mark Arax
The California Sunday Magazine

“The Poet’s Table”
Mayukh Sen
Poetry Foundation

“What Is Northern Food?”*
Steve Hoffman
Artful Living

Personal Essay, Long Form
“I Made the Pizza Cinnamon Rolls from Mario Batali’s Sexual Misconduct Apology Letter”*
Geraldine DeRuiter
Everywhereist.com

“Need to Find Me? Ask My Ham Man”
Catherine Down
The New York Times

“Writing an Iranian Cookbook in an Age of Anxiety”
Naz Deravian
The Atlantic

Personal Essay, Short Form
“Doritos is Developing Lady-Friendly Chips Because You Should Never Hear a Woman Crunch”
Maura Judkis
The Washington Post

“I’m a Chef with Terminal Cancer. This Is What I’m Doing with the Time I Have Left”*
Fatima Ali
Bon Appétit

“Savoring the School Lunch”
Rebekah Denn
The Seattle Times

Profile
“Heaven Was a Place in Harlem”
Vince Dixon
Eater

“The Short and Brilliant Life of Ernest Matthew Mickler”*
Michael Adno
The Bitter Southerner

“‘You Died’: The Resurrection of a Cook in the Heart of SF’s Demanding Culinary Scene”
Jonathan Kauffman
San Francisco Chronicle

Wine, Spirits, and Other Beverages
“The Gulp War”
Dave Stroup
Eater

“‘Welch’s Grape Jelly with Alcohol’: How Trump’s Horrific Wine Became the Ultimate Metaphor for His Presidency”*
Corby Kummer
Vanity Fair

“Why Is the Wine World So Un-Woke?”
Jon Bonné
Punch

Publication of the Year 

The New York Times

2019 James Beard Awards: complete list of nominees

March 27, 2019

James Beard Awards

The 2019 James Beard Foundation Restaurant and Chef Awards will take place May 6 at Lyric Opera of Chicago. The 2019 James Beard Media Awards, which honor those in the media who cover the culinary industry, will take place April 26 at Pier Sixty at Chelsea Piers in New York City. The awards will be streamed live on Twitter.

Here is the complete list of  nominations for the James Beard Foundation Restaurant and Chef Awards.

2019 James Beard Foundation Restaurant and Chef Awards

Best New Restaurant
A restaurant opened in the calendar year before the award will be given that already displays excellence in food, beverage, and service, and that is likely to make a significant impact in years to come.

Angler
San Francisco

Atomix
NYC

Bavel
Los Angeles

Frenchette
NYC

Majordomo
Los Angeles

Outstanding Baker
A pastry chef or baker who demonstrates exceptional skill, integrity, and character in the preparation of desserts, pastries, or breads served in a retail bakery. Must have been working as a pastry chef or baker for the past five years.

Zachary Golper
Bien Cuit
NYC

Maura Kilpatrick
Sofra Bakery and Café
Cambridge, MA

Lisa Ludwinski
Sister Pie
Detroit

Avery Ruzicka
Manresa Bread
Los Gatos, CA

Greg Wade
Publican Quality Bread
Chicago

Outstanding Bar Program
A restaurant or bar that demonstrates exceptional care and skill in the selection, preparation, and serving of cocktails, spirits, and/or beer.

Bar Agricole
San Francisco

Dead Rabbit
NYC

Kimball House
Decatur, GA

Lost Lake
Chicago

Ticonderoga Club
Atlanta

Outstanding Chef (Presented by All-Clad Metalcrafters)
A chef who sets high culinary standards and who has served as a positive example for other food professionals. Must have been working as a chef for the past five years.

Ashley Christensen
Poole’s Diner
Raleigh, NC

David Kinch
Manresa
Los Gatos, CA

Corey Lee
Benu
San Francisco

Donald Link
Herbsaint
New Orleans

Marc Vetri
Vetri Cucina
Philadelphia

Outstanding Pastry Chef (Presented by Lavazza)
A pastry chef or baker who demonstrates exceptional skill, integrity, and character in the preparation of desserts, pastries, or breads served in a restaurant. Must have been working as a pastry chef or baker for the past five years.

Juan Contreras
Atelier Crenn
San Francisco

Kelly Fields
Willa Jean
New Orleans

Meg Galus
Boka
Chicago

Margarita Manzke
République
Los Angeles

Pichet Ong
Brothers and Sisters
Washington, D.C.

Outstanding Restaurant (Presented by S.Pellegrino® Sparkling Natural Mineral Water)
A restaurant that demonstrates consistent excellence in food, atmosphere, service, and operations. Must have been in business 10 or more consecutive years.

Balthazar
NYC

FIG
Charleston, SC

Jaleo
Washington, D.C.

Quince
San Francisco

Zahav
Philadelphia

Outstanding Restaurateur (Presented by Magellan Corporation)
A restaurateur who demonstrates creativity in entrepreneurship and integrity in restaurant operations. Must have been in the restaurant business for at least 10 years. Must not have been nominated for a James Beard Foundation chef award in the past five years.

Hugh Acheson
Empire State South, Five & Ten, The National, and others
Atlanta

Kevin Boehm and Rob Katz
Boka Restaurant Group (Boka, Girl & the Goat, Momotaro, and others)
Chicago

JoAnn Clevenger
Upperline
New Orleans

Ken Oringer
Little Donkey, Toro, Uni, and others
Boston

Alex Raij and Eder Montero
La Vara, Txikito, Saint Julivert Fisherie, and others
NYC

Ellen Yin
High Street Hospitality Group (Fork, High Street on Market, High Street on Hudson)
Philadelphia

Outstanding Service
A restaurant in operation for five or more years that demonstrates consistency and exceptional thoughtfulness in hospitality and service.

Brigtsen’s
New Orleans

Canlis
Seattle

Frasca Food and Wine
Boulder, CO

Saison
San Francisco

Swan Oyster Depot
San Francisco

Zingerman’s Roadhouse
Ann Arbor, MI

Outstanding Wine Program (Presented by Robert Mondavi Winery)
A restaurant or bar that demonstrates excellence in wine service through a carefully considered wine list and a well-informed approach to helping customers choose and drink wine.

Bacchanal
New Orleans

Benu
San Francisco

Miller Union
Atlanta

Night + Market
Los Angeles

Spiaggia
Chicago

Outstanding Wine, Spirits, or Beer Producer
A beer, wine, or spirits producer who demonstrates consistency and exceptional skill in his or her craft.

Cathy Corison
Corison Winery
St. Helena, CA

Ann Marshall and Scott Blackwell
High Wire Distilling Co.
Charleston, SC

Steve Matthiasson
Matthiasson Wines
Napa, CA

Rob Tod
Allagash Brewing Company
Portland, ME

Lance Winters
St. George Spirits
Alameda, CA

Rising Star Chef of the Year (Presented by S.Pellegrino® Sparkling Natural Mineral Water)
A chef age 30 or younger who displays exceptional talent, character, and leadership ability, and who is likely to make a significant impact in years to come.

Ana Castro
Coquette
New Orleans

Alisha Elenz
MFK
Chicago

Alexander Hong
Sorrel
San Francisco

Jesse Ito
Royal Izakaya
Philadelphia

Kwame Onwuachi
Kith and Kin
Washington, D.C.

Jonathan Yao
Kato
Los Angeles

Best Chefs in America
Chefs who set high culinary standards and also demonstrate integrity and admirable leadership skills in their respective regions. A nominee may be from any kind of dining establishment but must have been working as a chef for at least five years, with the three most recent years spent in the region.

Best Chef: Great Lakes (IL, IN, MI, OH)

Diana Dávila
Mi Tocaya Antojería
Chicago

Jason Hammel
Lula Café
Chicago

Beverly Kim and Johnny Clark
Parachute
Chicago

David Posey and Anna Posey
Elske
Chicago

Noah Sandoval
Oriole
Chicago

Lee Wolen
Boka
Chicago

Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic (D.C., DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA)

Amy Brandwein
Centrolina
Washington, D.C.

Tom Cunanan
Bad Saint
Washington, D.C.

Rich Landau
Vedge
Philadelphia

Cristina Martinez
South Philly Barbacoa
Philadelphia

Cindy Wolf
Charleston
Baltimore

Best Chef: Midwest (IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, ND, SD, WI)

Michael Corvino
Corvino Supper Club & Tasting Room
Kansas City, MO

Michael Gallina
Vicia
St. Louis

Ann Kim
Young Joni
Minneapolis

Jamie Malone
Grand Café
Minneapolis

Christina Nguyen
Hai Hai
Minneapolis

Best Chef: New York City (Five Boroughs)

Sean Gray
Momofuku Ko

Brooks Headley
Superiority Burger

Daniela Soto-Innes
Atla

Alex Stupak
Empellón Midtown

Jody Williams and Rita Sodi
Via Carota

Best Chef: Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY State, RI, VT)

Tiffani Faison
Tiger Mama
Boston

James Mark
North
Providence

Tony Messina
Uni
Boston

Cassie Piuma
Sarma
Somerville, MA

Benjamin Sukle
Oberlin
Providence

Best Chef: Northwest (AK, ID, MT, OR, WA, WY)

Peter Cho
Han Oak
Portland, OR

Katy Millard
Coquine
Portland, OR

Brady Williams
Canlis
Seattle

Justin Woodward
Castagna
Portland, OR

Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi
Joule
Seattle

Best Chef: South (AL, AR, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, FL, LA, MS)

Vishwesh Bhatt
Snackbar
Oxford, MS

Jose Enrique
Jose Enrique
San Juan, PR

Kristen Essig and Michael Stoltzfus
Coquette
New Orleans

Slade Rushing
Brennan’s
New Orleans

Isaac Toups
Toups’ Meatery
New Orleans

Best Chef: Southeast (GA, KY, NC, SC, TN, WV)

Mashama Bailey
The Grey
Savannah, GA

Katie Button
Cúrate
Asheville, NC

Cassidee Dabney
The Barn at Blackberry Farm
Walland, TN

Ryan Smith
Staplehouse
Atlanta

Andrew Ticer and Michael Hudman
Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen
Memphis

Best Chef: Southwest (AZ, CO, NM, OK, TX, UT)

Charleen Badman
FnB
Scottsdale, AZ

Kevin Fink
Emmer & Rye
Austin

Michael Fojtasek
Olamaie
Austin

Bryce Gilmore
Barley Swine
Austin

Steve McHugh
Cured
San Antonio

Best Chef: West (CA, HI, NV)

Michael Cimarusti
Providence
Los Angeles

Jeremy Fox
Rustic Canyon
Santa Monica, CA

Jessica Koslow
Sqirl
Los Angeles

Travis Lett
Gjelina
Venice, CA

Joshua Skenes
Saison
San Francisco

2019 James Beard Foundation Outstanding Restaurant Design Awards

Winners will be announced on May 6, 2019.

75 Seats and Under
Firms: Heliotrope Architects and Price Erickson Interior Design
Project: Willmott’s Ghost, Seattle

Firm: Roman and Williams
Project: La Mercerie, NYC

Firm: Studio Writers
Project: Atomix, NYC

76 Seats and Over
Firm: Land and Sea Dept.
Project: Lonesome Rose, Chicago

Firm: studio razavi architecture
Project: Boqueria, NYC

Firm: Parts and Labor Design
Project: Pacific Standard Time, Chicago

Other Eating and Drinking Places
Firm: AvroKO
Project: China Live, San Francisco

Firm: Schwartz and Architecture (S^A)
Project: El Pípila, San Francisco

Firm: Summer Ops
Project: Island Oyster, NYC

Design Icon
Canlis
Seattle

The following honorees will accept their awards at the James Beard Awards Gala on May 6 at Lyric Opera of Chicago:

2019 James Beard Foundation America’s Classics

(Presented by American Airlines)

Pho 79
Garden Grove, CA
Owners: Tong Trần and Liễu Trần

Jim’s Steak & Spaghetti House
Huntington, WV
Owners: Jimmie Carder, Larry Tweel and Ron Tweel

A&A Bake & Double Roti Shop
Brooklyn, NY
Owners: Noel and Geeta Brown

Sehnert’s Bakery & Bieroc Café
McCook, NE
Owners: Matt and Shelly Sehnert

Annie’s Paramount Steakhouse
Washington, D.C.
Owner: Paul Katinas

2019 James Beard Foundation Humanitarian of the Year

The Giving Kitchen
Non-profit that provides emergency assistance to food service workers through financial support and a network of community resources.

2019 James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award

Patrick O’Connell
Multiple James Beard Award-Winning Chef; Chef & Owner, The Inn at Little Washington in Washington, VA

2019 James Beard Foundation Book Awards

For cookbooks and other non-fiction food- or beverage-related books that were published in the U.S. in 2018. Winners will be announced on April 26, 2019.

American
A Common Table: 80 Recipes and Stories from My Shared Cultures
Cynthia Chen McTernan
(Rodale)

Between Harlem and Heaven: Afro-Asian-American Cooking for Big Nights, Weeknights, and Every Day
JJ Johnson and Alexander Smalls with Veronica Chambers
(Flatiron Books)

Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking
Albert G. Lukas and Jessica B. Harris
(Smithsonian Books)

Baking and Desserts
Black Girl Baking: Wholesome Recipes Inspired by a Soulful Upbringing
Jerrelle Guy
(Page Street Publishing Co.)

Pie Squared: Irresistibly Easy Sweet & Savory Slab Pies
Cathy Barrow
(Grand Central Publishing)

SUQAR: Desserts & Sweets from the Modern Middle East
Greg Malouf and Lucy Malouf
(Hardie Grant Books)

Beverage
Apéritif: Cocktail Hour the French Way
Rebekah Peppler
(Clarkson Potter)

The Aviary Cocktail Book
Grant Achatz, Nick Kokonas, Micah Melton, Allen Hemberger, and Sarah Hemberger
(The Alinea Group)

Cocktail Codex
Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, and David Kaplan, with Devon Tarby
(Ten Speed Press)

Wine Folly: Magnum Edition
Madeline Puckette and Justin Hammack
(Avery)

General
Everyday Dorie
Dorie Greenspan
(Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Milk Street: Tuesday Nights
Christopher Kimball
(Little, Brown and Company)

Ottolenghi Simple
Yotam Ottolenghi
(Ten Speed Press)

Health and Special Diets
The Complete Diabetes Cookbook
Editors at America’s Test Kitchen
(America’s Test Kitchen)

Eat a Little Better
Sam Kass
(Clarkson Potter)

More with Less
Jodi Moreno
(Roost Books)

International
Feast: Food of the Islamic World
Anissa Helou
(Ecco)

The Food of Northern Thailand
Austin Bush
(Clarkson Potter)

I Am a Filipino
Nicole Ponseca and Miguel Trinidad
(Artisan Books)

Photography
Season: Big Flavors, Beautiful Food
Nik Sharma
(Chronicle Books)

Tokyo New Wave
Andrea Fazzari
(Ten Speed Press)

Wild: Adventure Cookbook
Luisa Brimble
(Prestel Publishing)

Reference, History, and Scholarship
Canned: The Rise and Fall of Consumer Confidence in the American Food Industry
Anna Zeide
(University of California Press)

Catfish Dream: Ed Scott’s Fight for His Family Farm and Racial Justice in the Mississippi Delta
Julian Rankin
(University of Georgia Press)

Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture
Justin Nystrom
(University of Georgia Press)

Restaurant and Professional
Chicken and Charcoal: Yakitori, Yardbird, Hong Kong
Matt Abergel
(Phaidon Press)

From the Earth: World’s Great, Rare and Almost Forgotten Vegetables
Peter Gilmore
(Hardie Grant Books)

Rich Table
Evan Rich and Sarah Rich
(Chronicle Books)

Single Subject
Bread & Butter: History, Culture, Recipes
Richard Snapes, Grant Harrington, and Eve Hemingway
(Quadrille Publishing)

Goat: Cooking and Eating
James Whetlor
(Quadrille Publishing)

Korean BBQ: Master Your Grill in Seven Sauces
Bill Kim with Chandra Ram
(Ten Speed Press)

Vegetable-Focused Cooking
Almonds, Anchovies, and Pancetta: A Vegetarian Cookbook, Kind Of
Cal Peternell
(William Morrow Cookbooks)

Saladish
Ilene Rosen
(Artisan Books)

Vegetarian Viet Nam
Cameron Stauch
(W. W. Norton & Company)

Writing
Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine
Edward Lee
(Artisan Books)

Hippie Food: How Back-to-the-Landers, Longhairs, and Revolutionaries Changed the Way We Eat
Jonathan Kauffman
(William Morrow)

Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture
Matt Goulding
(Harper Wave/Anthony Bourdain)

The winner of the Book of the Year Award and the Cookbook Hall of Fame inductee will be announced on April 26, 2019.

2019 James Beard Foundation Broadcast Media Awards

For radio, television broadcasts, podcasts, webcasts, and documentaries appearing in 2018. Winners will be announced on April 26, 2019.

Documentary
Chef Flynn
Airs on: Hulu, iTunes, and YouTube

Funke
Airs on: LA Film Festival and Tastemade

Modified
Airs on: Film festivals and Vimeo

Online Video, Fixed Location and/or Instructional
Handcrafted – How to Make Handmade Soba Noodles    
Airs on: Bon Appétit

Mad Genius – Crispy Cheese Sticks; Waffled Okonomiyaki; and Puff Pastry
Airs on: Food & Wine, YouTube, and Facebook

MasterClass – Dominique Ansel Teaches French Pastry Fundamentals
Airs on: MasterClass

Online Video, on Location
First We Feast’s Food Skills – Mozzarella Kings of New York
Airs on: YouTube

Kitchen Unnecessary – Fire Morels
Airs on: YouTube, Facebook

NPR Foraging – Eating Wild Sea Creatures; You Can Eat Dandelions; and The Hunt for Morels
Airs on: NPR

Outstanding Personality
Samin Nosrat
Salt Fat Acid Heat
Airs on: Netflix

Marcus Samuelsson
No Passport Required
Airs on: PBS

Molly Yeh
Girl Meets Farm
Airs on: Food Network

Outstanding Reporting
Deep Dive and Food for Thought, 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics
Reporter: David Chang
Airs on: NBC, NBCSN

In Real Life – Why You MUST Try Native American Cuisine
Reporter: Yara Elmjouie
Airs on: YouTube, AJ+

The Sporkful – Yewande Finds Her Super Power
Reporter: Dan Pashman
Airs on: Stitcher

Podcast
Copper & Heat – Be a Girl
Airs on: Copper & Heat, iTunes, Spotify, and Stitcher

The Feed – Paletas and Other Icy Treats
Airs on: PodcastOne

Racist Sandwich – Erasing Black Barbecue
Airs on: iTunes, Racist Sandwich, and Stitcher

Radio Show
California Foodways – Providing a Taste of Oaxaca to Central Valley; Can Ag and Wildlife Co-Exist? Rice Farmers Think So; and Frozen Burrito Royalty in the Central Valley
Airs on: KQED, California Foodways

The Food Chain – Raw Grief and Widowed
Airs on: BBC World Service

KCRW’s Good Food – Remembering Jonathan Gold
Airs on: KCRW

Special (on TV or Online)
Anthony Bourdain: Explore Parts Unknown – Little Los Angeles
Airs on: CNN, Explore Parts Unknown, Roads & Kingdoms

Spencer’s BIG Holiday
Airs on: Gusto

Taste Buds – Chefsgiving
Airs on: ABC

Television Program, in Studio or Fixed Location
Barefoot Contessa: Cook Like a Pro – Mary Poppins Show
Airs on: Food Network

Good Eats: Reloaded – Steak Your Claim
Airs on: Cooking Channel

Pati’s Mexican Table – Tijuana: Stories from the Border
Airs on: WETA Washington; Distributed Nationally by American Public Television

Television Program, on Location
The Migrant Kitchen – Man’oushe
Airs on: KCET and Link TV

Salt Fat Acid Heat – Salt
Airs on: Netflix

Ugly Delicious – Fried Chicken
Airs on: Netflix

Visual and Technical Excellence
Anthony Bourdain: Explore Parts Unknown
Sarah Hagey, August Thurmer, and Kate Kunath
Airs on: CNN, Explore Parts Unknown, Roads & Kingdoms

Chef’s Table
Will Basanta, Adam Bricker, and Danny O’Malley
Airs on: Netflix

From The Wild – Season 4
Kevin Kossowan
Airs on: Vimeo

2019 James Beard Foundation Journalism Awards

For articles published in English in 2018. Winners will be announced on April 26, 2019.

Columns
America’s Best Worst Cook: “Hi, I’m America’s Best Worst Cook”; “Dear Chefs, Will Eating This Kill Me?” and “How to Roast a Chicken? The Answers Are Horrifying.”
JJ Goode
Taste

Local Fare: “The Question of Dinner”; “Dixie Vodka”; and “Folk Witness”
John T. Edge
Oxford American

What We Talk About When We Talk About American Food: “The Pickled Cucumbers That Survived the 1980s AIDS Epidemic”; “A Second Look at the Tuna Sandwich’s All-American History”; and “Freedom and Borscht for Ukrainian-Jewish Émigrés”
Mari Uyehara
Taste

Craig Claiborne Distinguished Restaurant Review Award
Counter Intelligence: “The Hearth & Hound, April Bloomfield’s New Los Angeles Restaurant, Is Nothing Like a Gastropub”; “There’s Crocodile and Hog Stomach, but Jonathan Gold Is All About the Crusty Rice at Nature Pagoda”; and “At Middle Eastern Restaurants, It All Starts with Hummus. Jonathan Gold says Bavel’s Is Magnificent”
Jonathan Gold
Los Angeles Times

“The Fire Gods of Washington, D.C.”; “David Chang’s Majordomo Is No Minor Feat”; and “North America’s Best Cantonese Food Is in Canada”
Bill Addison
Eater

“The Four Seasons Returns. But Can It Come Back?” “Why David Chang Matters”; and “A Celebration of Black Southern Food, at JuneBaby in Seattle”
Pete Wells
The New York Times

Dining and Travel
Chau Down: “A New Orleans Food Diary”; “A Portland Food Diary”; and “A Chicago Food Diary”
Danny Chau
The Ringer

“Dim Sum Is Dead, Long Live Dim Sum”
Max Falkowitz
Airbnb Magazine

“Many Chinas, Many Tables”
Jonathan Kauffman and Team
San Francisco Chronicle

Feature Reporting
“Big in Japan”
Tejal Rao
The New York Times Magazine

“A Kingdom from Dust”
Mark Arax
The California Sunday Magazine

“Shell Game: Saving Florida’s Oysters Could Mean Killing a Way of Life”
Laura Reiley and Eve Edelheit
Tampa Bay Times

Food Coverage in a General Interest Publication
New York Magazine
Robin Raisfeld, Rob Patronite, Maggie Bullock, and the Staff of New York Magazine

Roads & Kingdoms
Nathan Thornburgh, Matt Goulding, Anup Kaphle, and the Roads & Kingdoms Team

T: The New York Times Style Magazine
Kurt Soller, Hanya Yanagihara, and the Staff of T Magazine

Foodways
“Back to Where It All Began: I Had Never Eaten in Ghana Before. But My Ancestors Had.”
Michael W. Twitty
Bon Appétit

“A Hunger for Tomatoes”
Shane Mitchell
The Bitter Southerner

“What is Northern Food?”
Steve Hoffman
Artful Living

Health and Wellness
“Clean Label’s Dirty Little Secret”
Nadia Berenstein
The New Food Economy

“The Last Conversation You’ll Ever Need to Have About Eating Right” and “The Last Conversation You’ll Need to Have on Eating Right: The Follow-ups”
Mark Bittman and David L. Katz
New York Magazine / Grub Street

“‘White People Food’ Is Creating An Unattainable Picture Of Health”
Kristen Aiken
HuffPost

Home Cooking
“Melissa Clark’s Thanksgiving”
Melissa Clark
The New York Times

“The Subtle Thrills of Cold Chicken Salad”
Cathy Erway
Taste

“Top Secret Ingredients”
Kathleen Purvis
Garden & Gun

Innovative Storytelling
“In Search of Water-Boiled Fish”
Angie Wang
Eater

“100 Most Jewish Foods”
Alana Newhouse, Gabriella Gershenson, and Stephanie Butnick
Tablet Magazine

“What’s in a Food Truck?”
Bonnie Berkowitz, Seth Blanchard, Aaron Steckelberg, and Monica Ulmanu
The Washington Post

Investigative Reporting
“‘It’s Not Fair, Not Right’: How America Treats Its Black Farmers”
Debbie Weingarten and Audra Mulkern
The Guardian and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project

“A Killing Season”
Boyce Upholt
The New Republic

“Victims Blame FDA for Food-Recall Failures”
Christine Haughney Dare-Bryan
Politico

Jonathan Gold Local Voice Award

“Storied Ovens”; “Food Outside the U.S. Open Gates”; and “A New Destination for Chinese Food: Not Flushing, but Forest Hills”
Max Falkowitz
The New York Times; Plate Magazine

“My Dinner at the Playboy Club”; “Curry and Roti Destination Singh’s Lights Up Queens”; and “Where New Yorkers Actually Eat in Times Square”
Robert Sietsema
Eater NY

“Yes Indeed, Lord: Queen’s Cuisine, Where Everything Comes from the Heart”; “Top 10 New Orleans Restaurants for 2019”; and “Sexual Harassment Allegations Preceded Sucré Co-Founder Tariq Hanna’s Departure”
Brett Anderson
Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

M.F.K. Fisher Distinguished Writing Award
“A Kingdom from Dust”
Mark Arax
The California Sunday Magazine

“The Poet’s Table”
Mayukh Sen
Poetry Foundation

“What Is Northern Food?”
Steve Hoffman
Artful Living

Personal Essay, Long Form
“I Made the Pizza Cinnamon Rolls from Mario Batali’s Sexual Misconduct Apology Letter”
Geraldine DeRuiter
Everywhereist.com

“Need to Find Me? Ask My Ham Man”
Catherine Down
The New York Times

“Writing an Iranian Cookbook in an Age of Anxiety”
Naz Deravian
The Atlantic

Personal Essay, Short Form
“Doritos is Developing Lady-Friendly Chips Because You Should Never Hear a Woman Crunch”
Maura Judkis
The Washington Post

“I’m a Chef with Terminal Cancer. This Is What I’m Doing with the Time I Have Left”
Fatima Ali
Bon Appétit

“Savoring the School Lunch”
Rebekah Denn
The Seattle Times

Profile
“Heaven Was a Place in Harlem”
Vince Dixon
Eater

“The Short and Brilliant Life of Ernest Matthew Mickler”
Michael Adno
The Bitter Southerner

“‘You Died’: The Resurrection of a Cook in the Heart of SF’s Demanding Culinary Scene”
Jonathan Kauffman
San Francisco Chronicle

Wine, Spirits, and Other Beverages
“The Gulp War”
Dave Stroup
Eater

“‘Welch’s Grape Jelly with Alcohol’: How Trump’s Horrific Wine Became the Ultimate Metaphor for His Presidency”
Corby Kummer
Vanity Fair

“Why Is the Wine World So Un-Woke?”
Jon Bonné
Punch

Publication of the Year will be decided by the members of the James Beard Awards Journalism Committee and will be announced at the awards ceremony.

2019 Lollapalooza Festival: Ariana Grande, Childish Gambino, Twenty One Pilots are headliners

March 20, 2019

Ariana Grande, Childish Gambino and Twenty One Pilots are headlining the Lollapalooza Festival that takes place at Chicago’s Grant Field from August 1 to August 4, 2019.

Lollapalooza is promoted by C3 Presents. Other artists performing at the festival include the Strokes, Tame Impala, Flume, the Chainsmokers, J Balvin, Kacey Musgraves, Lil Wayne, Janelle Monáe, Meek Mill, Tenacious D, 21 Savage, Death Cab for Cutie, H.E.R., Perry Farrell’s Kind Heaven Orchestra, the Revivalists, Alesso, Slash, RL Grime, Hozier, Gary Clark Jr. and 6lack.

Grande, Childish Gambino and Tame Impala are headliners at the 2019 Coachella Festival, which is promoted by Goldenvoice. Childish Gambino is also performing at the 2019 Bonnaroo Festival, which is promoted by Superfly.

Lollapalooza 2019

CrimeCon launches spinoff events: CrimeCon on the Run, CrowdSolve

March 15, 2019

by Carla Hay

CrimeCon, the annual convention for fans of true-crime stories, is launching two spin-off events:

CrimeCon on the Run

WHEN: March 29, 2019

WHERE: Thalia Hall in Chicago

WHO & WHAT: This one-night event will feature three popular panels from CrimeCon:

  • “How to Catch a Liar,” moderated by Stephen David Lampley
  • “Crime Scene Reconstruction,” moderated by Karen Smith
  • “Tales from the Bronx Cold Case Squad,” moderated by Joe Giacalone

“Court Junkie” podcast host/producer Jillian Jalali is hosting the event. Admission prices range from $50 to $80 per person.

CrowdSolve

WHEN: October 18 to October 20, 2019

WHERE: The Westin, Seattle

WHO & WHAT: This three-day event with attendees getting a chance to play investigators/detectives in a real-life cases.  The case and leaders are to be announced. Admission prices range from $279 to $749 per person.

The main CrimeCon convention takes place this year from June 7 to June 9 at the Hilton Riverside in New Orleans. Red Seat Ventures produces all CrimeCon events.