Movie and TV Reviews

Reviews for New Movies Released September 18 – October 23, 2020

2 Hearts (Photo courtesy of Freestyle Digital Media)

 

12 Hour Shift (Photo by Matt Glass/Magnet Releasing)

 

Alone (Photo courtesy of Lionsgate)

 

Antebellum (Photo by Matt Kennedy/Lionsgate)

 

The Artist’s Wife (Photo courtesy of Strand Releasing)

 

Black Box (Photo by Alan Markfield/Amazon Studios)

 

The Curse of Audrey Earnshaw (Photo courtesy of Epic Pictures)

 

The Dark Divide (Photo courtesy of Strike Back Studios and REI Co-op Studios)

 

Do Not Reply (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

The Doorman (Photo courtesy of Lionsgate)

 

Evil Eye (Photo by Alfonso Bresciani/Amazon Studios)

 

Halloween Party (Photo courtesy of Red Hound Films)

 

Honest Thief (Photo courtesy of Open Road Films)

 

Hosts (Photo courtesy of Dark Sky Films)

 

I’ve Got Issues (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

Kajillionaire (Photo by Matt Kennedy/Focus Features)

 

The Lie (Photo by Jasper Savage/Amazon Studios)

 

Love and Monsters (Photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures)

 

LX 2048 (Photo courtesy of Quiver Distribution)

 

Mighty Ira (Photo courtesy of Foundation for Individual Rights in Education)

 

Misbehaviour (Photo courtesy of Shout! Factory)

 

Nocturne (Photo courtesy of Amazon Studios)

 

Once Upon a River (Photo by Daniel Klutznick/Film Movement)

 

On the Rocks (Photo courtesy of Apple TV+)

 

Ottolenghi and the Cakes of Versailles (Photo courtesy of IFC Films)

 

The Place of No Words (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

Possessor Uncut (Photo courtesy of Neon)

 

The Racer (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

Red Shoes and the Seven Dwarfs (Image courtesy of Lionsgate)

 

Roald Dahl’s The Witches (Photo by Daniel Smith/HBO Max)

 

Save Yourselves! (Photo courtesy of Bleecker Street)

 

She’s in Portland (Photo courtesy of Freestyle Digital Media)

 

Shithouse (Photo courtesy of IFC Films)

 

Shortcut (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

Somebody Up There Likes Me (Photo courtesy of Eagle Rock Entertainment)

 

Spontaneous (Photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures)

 

The Swerve (Photo courtesy of Epic Pictures)

 

Tar (Photo courtesy of 1091 Pictures)

 

Ten Minutes to Midnight (Photo courtesy of 1091 Pictures)

 

Then Came You (Photo courtesy of Vertical Entertainment)

 

Time (Photo courtesy of Amazon Studios)

 

Totally Under Control (Photo courtesy of Neon)

 

The War With Grandpa (Photo courtesy of 101 Studios)

 

The Wolf of Snow Hollow (Photo courtesy of Orion Classics)

 

Yellow Rose (Photo courtesy of Stage 6 Films)

Complete List of Reviews

1BR — horror

2/1 — drama

2 Graves in the Desert — drama

2 Hearts — drama

2 Minutes of Fame — comedy

5 Years Apart — comedy

12 Hour Shift — horror

17 Blocks — documentary

37 Seconds — drama

The 420 Movie (2020) — comedy

2040 — documentary

7500 — drama

Aamis — drama

Abe — drama

Advocate — documentary

After Class (formerly titled Safe Spaces) — comedy/drama

After Parkland — documentary

After Truth: Disinformation and the Cost of Fake News — documentary

AKA Jane Roe — documentary

Algorithm: Bliss — sci-fi/horror

All Day and a Night — drama

All I Can Say — documentary

All In: The Fight for Democracy — documentary

Almost Love (also titled Sell By) — comedy/drama

Alone (2020) (starring Tyler Posey) — horror

Amazing Grace — documentary

An American Pickle — comedy

American Street Kid — documentary

American Woman — drama

Amulet — horror

And Then We Danced — drama

Antebellum — horror

Anthony — drama

Apocalypse ’45 — documentary

The Apollo — documentary

The Argument — comedy

Artemis Fowl — fantasy

The Artist’s Wife — drama

Ask for Jane — drama

Ask No Questions — documentary

The Assistant — drama

At the Heart of Gold: Inside the USA Gymnastics Scandal — documentary

Athlete A — documentary

Babysplitters — comedy

Babyteeth — drama

Bacurau — drama

Bad Boys for Life — action

Bad Education (2020) — drama

Bad Therapy (formerly titled Judy Small) — comedy/drama

Banana Split — comedy

Banksy and the Rise of Outlaw Art — documentary

Beanpole — drama

Beastie Boys Story — documentary

Becoming — documentary

Behind You — horror

Beneath Us — horror

Big Time Adolescence — comedy/drama

The Big Ugly — drama

Bill & Ted Face the Music — sci-fi/comedy

The Binge — comedy

Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) — action

Blackbird (2020) — drama

Black Box (2020) — drama

Black Is King — musical

Black Magic for White Boys — comedy

Blessed Child — documentary

Blood and Money — drama

Blood on Her Name — drama

Bloodshot (2020) — sci-fi/action

Blow the Man Down — drama

Blue Story — drama

Blumhouse’s Fantasy Island — horror

Body Cam — horror

The Booksellers — documentary

The Boys (premiere episode) — sci-fi/drama

Brahms: The Boy II — horror

Breslin and Hamill: Deadline Artists — documentary

The Broken Hearts Gallery — comedy

Browse — drama

Buffaloed — comedy

Bully. Coward. Victim. The Story of Roy Cohn — documentary

Burden (2020) — drama

Burning Cane — drama

The Burnt Orange Heresy — drama

The Call of the Wild (2020) — live-action/animation

Call Your Mother — documentary

Cane River — drama

Capone — drama

Carmilla — drama

Castle in the Ground — drama

Centigrade — drama

Changing the Game — documentary

Children of the Sea — animation

Circus of Books — documentary

The Clearing (2020) — horror

Clementine — drama

Close Encounters of the Fifth Kind: Contact Has Begun — documentary

Clover — drama

Coachella: 20 Years in the Desert — documentary

Coffee & Kareem — comedy

Color Out of Space — sci-fi/horror

Come as You Are (2020)  — comedy

Come to Daddy — horror

The Cordillera of Dreams — documentary

Count Basie: Through His Own Eyes — documentary

Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words — documentary

Creem: America’s Only Rock’n’Roll Magazine — documentary

Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution — documentary

Critical Thinking — drama

Crown Vic — drama

CRSHD — comedy

The Curse of Audrey Earnshaw — horror

Cut Throat City — drama

Da 5 Bloods — drama

Daddy Issues (2020) — comedy

Dads — documentary

Dangerous Lies — drama

The Dark Divide — drama

A Day in the Life of America — documentary

Days of Rage: The Rolling Stones’ Road to Altamont — documentary

Days of the Whale — drama

A Deadly Legend — horror

Decade of Fire — documentary

The Deeper You Dig — horror

The Delicacy — documentary

Denise Ho — Becoming the Song — documentary

Desolation Center — documentary

Desperados — comedy

Devil’s Night: Dawn of the Nain Rouge — horror

Devil’s Pie – D’Angelo — documentary

Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy — documentary

Disappearance at Clifton Hill — drama

Disclosure (2020) — documentary

Diving With Dolphins — documentary

The Dog Doc — documentary

Dolittle — live-action/animation

Dolphin Reef — documentary

Do Not Reply — horror

The Doorman (2020) — action

Dosed — documentary

Downhill — comedy

Dreamland (2020) (starring Margot Robbie) — drama

Driven to Abstraction — documentary

Driveways — drama

Easy Does It — comedy

Elephant (2020) — documentary

Ella Fitzgerald: Just One of Those Things — documentary

Emma (2020) — comedy/drama

End of Sentence — drama

Epicentro — documentary

The Etruscan Smile (also titled Rory’s Way) — drama

Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga — comedy

Evil Eye (2020) — horror

Exit Plan — drama

Extraction (2020) — action

A Fall From Grace — drama

Fatal Affair (2020) — drama

Fatima (2020) — drama

The Fight (2020) — documentary

First Cow — drama

Flipped (2020) — comedy

Force of Nature (2020) — action

For They Know Not What They Do — documentary

Four Kids and It — fantasy

Framing John DeLorean — documentary

Game of Death (2020) — horror

Ganden: A Joyful Land — documentary

The Garden Left Behind — drama

The Gasoline Thieves — drama

Gay Chorus Deep South — documentary

The Gentlemen — action

Get Duked! (formerly titled Boyz in the Wood) — comedy

Get Gone — horror

The Ghost of Peter Sellers — documentary

A Girl From Mogadishu — drama

A Girl Missing — drama

The Go-Go’s — documentary

Goldie — drama

Good Posture — comedy

Gordon Lightfoot: If You Could Read My Mind — documentary

Greed — comedy/drama

Gretel & Hansel — horror

Greyhound — drama

The Grudge (2020) — horror

Guest of Honour — drama

The Half of It — comedy

Halloween Party (2020) — horror

Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics — documentary

He Dreams of Giants — documentary

Healing From Hate: Battle for the Soul of a Nation — documentary

Helmut Newton: The Bad and the Beautiful — documentary

The High Note — comedy/drama

Holly Slept Over — comedy

Honest Thief — action

Hooking Up (2020) — comedy

Hope Gap — drama

Horse Girl — sci-fi/drama

The Host (2020) — horror

Hosts — horror

House of Hummingbird — drama

How to Build a Girl — comedy

Human Capital — drama

Human Nature (2020) — documentary

The Hunt — horror

I Am Human — documentary

I Am Somebody’s Child: The Regina Louise Story — drama

I Am Vengeance: Retaliation — action

I Hate New York — documentary

I Hate the Man in My Basement — drama

I’m Gonna Make You Love Me — documentary

Impractical Jokers: The Movie — comedy

Incitement — drama

Infamous (2020) — drama

The Infiltrators — docudrama

Initials SG — drama

Inna De Yard: The Soul of Jamaica — documentary

Instaband — documentary

In the Footsteps of Elephant — documentary

The Invisible Man (2020) — horror

Irresistible (2020) — comedy

I Still Believe — drama

It Takes a Lunatic — documentary

I Used to Go Here — comedy/drama

I’ve Got Issues — comedy

I Want My MTV — documentary

I Will Make You Mine — drama

Jay Myself — documentary

John Henry — action

John Lewis: Good Trouble — documentary

Judy & Punch — drama

Kajillionaire — comedy/drama

Kat and the Band — comedy

Kaye Ballard: The Show Goes On! — documentary

Kill Chain: The Cyber War on America’s Elections — documentary

Killer Therapy — horror

The Kill Team (2019) — drama

Kill the Monsters — drama

The Kindness of Strangers — drama

The King of Staten Island — comedy/drama

La Llorona — horror

The Last Full Measure — drama

The Lawyer — drama

Leftover Women — documentary

Les Misérables (2019) — drama

The Lie (2020) — comedy

Like a Boss — comedy

Limerence — comedy

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice — documentary

Lingua Franca — drama

The Lodge — horror

The Longest Wave — documentary

Lost Bayou — drama

Lost Transmissions — drama

Los Últimos Frikis — documentary

Love and Monsters — sci-fi/horror/action

The Lovebirds — comedy

Love Wedding Repeat — comedy

Low Tide — drama

Lucky Grandma — action

Luz: The Flower of Evil — horror

LX 2048 — sci-fi

Lydia Lunch: The War Is Never Over — documentary

Mai Khoi & the Dissidents — documentary

The Main Event (2020) — action

Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound— documentary

Martha: A Picture Story — documentary

Martin Margiela: In His Own Words — documentary

Maurice Hines: Bring Them Back — documentary

Mighty Ira — documentary

Mighty Oak — drama

Military Wives — comedy/drama

The Mindfulness Movement — documentary

Misbehaviour — drama

Miss Americana — documentary

Most Dangerous Game — action

Most Wanted (formerly titled Target Number One) — drama

Mr. Soul! — documentary

Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado — documentary

Mulan (2020) — fantasy

Murder in the Front Row: The San Francisco Bay Area Thrash Metal Story — documentary

Murder to Mercy: The Cyntoia Brown Story — documentary

My Boyfriend’s Meds — comedy

My Darling Vivian — documentary

My Spy — comedy

Mystify: Michael Hutchence — documentary

Natalie Wood: What Remains Behind — documentary

Never Rarely Sometimes Always — drama

Never Too Late (2020) — comedy

A Nice Girl Like You — comedy

Noah Land — drama

Nocturne (2020) — horror

Nomad: In the Footsteps of Bruce Chatwin — documentary

No Small Matter — documentary

The Old Guard — action

Olympia — documentary

Olympic Dreams — comedy/drama

Once Upon a River — drama

Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band — documentary

One Hour Outcall — drama

One Night in Bangkok — drama

Only — sci-fi/drama

On the Record — documentary

On the Rocks (2020) — drama

On the Trail: Inside the 2020 Primaries — documentary

Onward — animation

Open — drama

Ordinary Love — drama

Otherhood — comedy

The Other Lamb — drama

Other Music — documentary

Ottolenghi and the Cakes of Versailles — documentary

Our Time Machine — documentary

Out of Blue — drama

The Outpost — drama

Out Stealing Horses — drama

The Painter and the Thief — documentary

Palm Springs — comedy

Parkland Rising — documentary

A Patient Man — drama

The Personal History of David Copperfield — comedy/drama

The Photograph — drama

Picture Character — documentary

The Place of No Words — drama

Plucked — documentary

Plus One (2019) — comedy

The Pollinators — documentary

Pornstar Pandemic: The Guys — documentary

Possessor Uncut — sci-fi/horror

Premature (2020) — drama

The Price of Desire — drama

Project Power — sci-fi/action

Public Enemy Number One — documentary

The Quiet One — documentary

The Racer — drama

Radioactive — drama

Raising Buchanan — comedy

Rebuilding Paradise — documentary

Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project — documentary

Red Penguins — documentary

Red Shoes and the Seven Dwarfs — animation

A Regular Woman — drama

Relic — horror

The Rental (2020) — horror

Rent-A-Pal — horror

The Rescue List — documentary

Resistance (2020) — drama

Retaliation (formerly titled Romans) — drama

Rewind — documentary

The Rhythm Section — action

Ride Like a Girl — drama

River City Drumbeat — documentary

Roald Dahl’s The Witches — horror/fantasy

Robert the Bruce — drama

Runner — documentary

Run With the Hunted — drama

Saint Frances — comedy/drama

Save Yourselves! — sci-fi/horror/comedy

The Scheme (2020) — documentary

Scheme Birds — documentary

Scoob! — animation

Scream, Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street — documentary

Screened Out — documentary

Seahorse: The Dad Who Gave Birth (formerly titled Seahorse) — documentary

Seberg — drama

The Secret: Dare to Dream — drama

A Secret Love — documentary

The Secrets We Keep — drama

See Know Evil — documentary

See You Yesterday — sci-fi/drama

Selah and the Spades — drama

Sergio (2020) — drama

Shadows of Freedom — documentary

She Dies Tomorrow — drama

She’s in Portland — drama

Shine Your Eyes — drama

Shirley — drama

Shithouse — drama

Shortcut — horror

The Short History of the Long Road — drama

Showbiz Kids — documentary

The Show’s the Thing: The Legendary Promoters of Rock — documentary

A Simple Wedding — comedy

Skin Deep: The Battle Over Morgellons — documentary

Skin Walker — horror

Skyman — sci-fi/drama

Slay the Dragon — documentary

Somebody Up There Likes Me (2020) — documentary

Sometimes Always Never — comedy/drama

The Sonata — horror

Sonic the Hedgehog — live-action/animation

Sorry We Missed You — drama

Spaceship Earth — documentary

Spelling the Dream (formerly titled Breaking the Bee) — documentary

Spontaneous — sci-fi/horror/comedy

Sputnik — sci-fi/horror

Standing Up, Falling Down — comedy/drama

Starting at Zero — documentary

Stevenson Lost & Found — documentary

Still Here (2020) — drama

The Story of Soaps — documentary

The Stranger (Quibi original) — drama

Stray Dolls — drama

Street Survivors: The True Story of the Lynyrd Skynyrd Plane Crash — drama

The Stylist — horror

Sublime — documentary

Summerland — drama

The Sunlit Night — comedy/drama

The Surrogate — drama

Survive — drama

Swallow — drama

The Swerve — drama

The Swing of Things — comedy

Tape — drama

Tar — horror

A Taste of Sky — documentary

Ten Minutes to Midnight  — horror

Tesla  — drama

Then Came You (2020)  — comedy

The Thing About Harry  — comedy

Think Like a Dog — comedy/drama

This Is Personal — documentary

This Is Stand-Up — documentary

A Thousand Cuts (2020) — documentary

A Thread of Deceit: The Hart Family Tragedy — documentary

Tijuana Jackson: Purpose Over Prison — comedy

Time (2020) — documentary

The Times of Bill Cunningham — documentary

Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made  — comedy

To Kid or Not to Kid — documentary

The Tobacconist — drama

Tommaso — drama

Tom of Your Life — sci-fi/comedy

Totally Under Control — documentary

The Trip to Greece — comedy

Trixie Mattel: Moving Parts — documentary

Trolls World Tour — animation

Troop Zero — comedy

The Truth — drama

The Turning (2020) — horror

Tyson — documentary

Unbelievable (premiere episode) — drama

Uncaged (also titled Prey) – horror

Uncorked — drama

Underwater — sci-fi/horror

Unhinged (2020) — action

Up From the Streets: New Orleans: The City of Music — documentary

Ursula von Rydingsvard: Into Her Own — documentary

Valley Girl (2020) — musical

The Vanished (2020) (formerly titled Hour of Lead)— drama

The Vast of Night — sci-fi/drama

Vas-y Coupe! — documentary

Viral: Antisemitism in Four Mutations — documentary

Vivarium — sci-fi/drama

Waiting for the Barbarians — drama

The War With Grandpa — comedy

Watson — documentary

The Way Back (2020) — drama

We Are Freestyle Love Supreme — documentary

We Are Little Zombies — comedy/drama

We Are the Radical Monarchs — documentary

Weathering With You — animation

Welcome to Chechnya — documentary

What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali — documentary

What We Found — drama

What Will Become of Us — documentary

When the Streetlights Go On — drama

The Whistlers — drama

A White, White Day — drama

Widow of Silence — drama

Wig — documentary

The Windermere Children — drama

The Wolf House — animation

The Wolf of Snow Hollow — horror

A Woman’s Work: The NFL’s Cheerleader Problem — documentary

Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation — documentary

Words on Bathroom Walls — drama

Work It — comedy/drama

The Wretched — horror

The Wrong Missy — comedy

XY Chelsea — documentary

Yellow Rose — drama

You Cannot Kill David Arquette — documentary

You Don’t Nomi — documentary

You Go to My Head — drama

You Should Have Left — horror

Yusuf Hawkins: Storm Over Brooklyn — documentary

Zombi Child — horror

2020 Horror Movie Hub

There’s no doubt about it: Horror movies are hot right now. Here’s a list of horror flicks with releases in 2020. They’re all here, whether they are movies with theatrical releases, films that went directly to video, or movies that are only available on streaming services or TV networks. Movies that were reviewed on Culture Mix get a featured spotlight, while all the rest of the movies are listed below.

For the purposes of this list, “horror movies” are defined as movies that are intended to be scary, which are often different from crime movies. For example, “Halloween” is a horror movie. “Scarface” is not. As a helpful guide, the movies on this list are identified by the subgenres in horror.

NOTE: This list is only for movies released in the United States. The availability of a movie on this list might vary outside the U.S.

Horror Movies of 2020: Culture Mix Reviews

1BR (Photo courtesy of Dark Sky Films)

 

12 Hour Shift (Photo by Matt Glass/Magnet Releasing)

 

Algorithm: Bliss (Photo courtesy of Green Apple Entertainment)

 

Alone (Photo courtesy of Lionsgate)

 

Amulet (Photo by Rob Baker Ashton/Magnet Releasing)

 

Antebellum (Photo by Matt Kennedy/Lionsgate)

 

Behind You (Photo courtesy of Vertical Entertainment)

 

Beneath Us (Photo courtesy of New Mainstream Entertainment)

 

Black Box (Photo by Alan Markfield/Amazon Studios)

 

Blumhouse’s Fantasy island (Photo by Christopher Moss)

 

Body Cam (Photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures)

 

Brahms: The Boy II (Photo courtesy of STX)

 

The Clearing (Photo courtesy of Crackle)

 

Color Out of Space (Photo courtesy of RLJE Films)

 

Come to Daddy (Photo by Jamie Leigh Gianopoulos)

 

The Curse of Audrey Earnshaw (Photo courtesy of Epic Pictures)

 

A Deadly Legend (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

The Deeper You Dig (Photo courtesy of Dark Sky Films)

 

Do Not Reply (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

Evil Eye (Photo by Alfonso Bresciani/Amazon Studios)

 

Game of Death (Photo courtesy of Cleopatra Entertainment)

 

Get Gone (Photo courtesy of Cleopatra Entertainment)

 

The Grudge (Photo by Allen Fraser/Sony Pictures)

 

Halloween Party (Photo courtesy of Red Hound Films)

 

The Host (Photo by Ashley Paton Photography/Pearl Pictures Productions)

 

Hosts (Photo courtesy of Dark Sky Films)

 

The Hunt (Photo by Patti Perret/Universal Pictures)

 

The Invisible Man (Photo by Mark Rogers/Universal Pictures)

 

Killer Therapy (Photo courtesy of 4Digital Media)

 

La Llorona (Photo courtesy of Shudder)

 

The Lodge (Photo courtesy of Neon)

 

Love and Monsters (Photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures)

 

Luz: The Flower of Evil (Photo courtesy of Dark Sky Films/MPI Media)

 

Nocturne (Photo courtesy of Amazon Studios)

 

Possessor Uncut (Photo courtesy of Neon)

 

Relic (Photo courtesy of IFC Midnight)

 

The Rental (Photo courtesy of IFC Films)

 

Rent-A-Pal (Photo courtesy of IFC Films/IFC Midnight)

 

Roald Dahl’s The Witches (Photo by Daniel Smith/HBO Max)

 

Save Yourselves! (Photo courtesy of Bleecker Street)

 

Scream, Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street (Photo courtesy of New Line Cinema)

 

Shortcut (Photo courtesy of Gravitas Ventures)

 

Skin Walker (Photo courtesy of Cleopatra Entertainment)

 

The Sonata (Photo courtesy of Screen Media Films)

 

Spontaneous (Photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures)

 

Sputnik (Photo courtesy of IFC Films/IFC Midnight)

 

Tar (Photo courtesy of 1091 Pictures)

 

Ten Minutes to Midnight (Photo courtesy of 1091 Pictures)

 

The Turning (Photo by Patrick Redmond/Universal Pictures and DreamWorks Pictures)

 

Uncaged (Photo courtesy of 4Digital Media)

 

Underwater (Photo by Alan Markfield)

 

The Wolf of Snow Hollow (Photo courtesy of Orion Classics)

 

The Wretched (Photo courtesy of IFC Midnight)

 

You Should Have Left (Photo by Nick Wall/Universal Pictures)

 

Zombi Child (Photo courtesy of Film Movement)

Complete List of Horror Movies Released in 2020

  • sci-fi horror = futuristic science or outer-space aliens
  • slasher horror = killer humans or wild animals
  • supernatural horror  = evil spirits
  • vampire horror = killer vampires
  • zombie horror = killer zombies

0.0MHz — supernatural horror

1BR — supernatural horror

8 Graves — supernatural horror

12 Hour Shift — slasher horror

Abominable (2020) — supernatural horror

Agony (2020) — supernatural horror

Algorithm: Bliss — sci-fi horror

Alien Outbreak — sci fi horror

#Alive — zombie horror

Alone (2020) (starring Jules Willcox) — slasher horror

Alone (2020) (starring Tyler Posey) — zombie horror

Amulet — supernatural horror

Antebellum — slasher horror

The Assent— supernatural horror

Attack of the Unknown — sci-fi horror

Attraction 2: Invasion — sci-fi horror

A Babysitter’s Guide to Monster Hunting — supernatural horror

The Babysitter: Killer Queen — supernatural horror

Bad Hair — supernatural horror

The Beach House — supernatural horror

Becky — slasher horror

Before the Fire — sci-fi horror

Behind You — supernatural horror

Beneath Us — slasher horror

Black Box (2020) — sci-fi horror

The Blackout: Invasion Earth — sci-fi horror

Black Water: Abyss — slasher horror

Blood Clots — zombie/supernatural horror

Blood From Stone — vampire horror

Blood Quantum — zombie horror

The Blood Thins — supernatural horror

Blood Vessel — vampire horror

Blumhouse’s Fantasy Island — supernatural horror

Body Cam — supernatural horror

Books of Blood — supernatural horror

The Boulet Brothers’ Dragula: Resurrection — documentary horror

Brahms: The Boy II — supernatural horror

Chop Chop — slasher horror

The Clearing (2020) — zombie horror

The Cleansing Hour — supernatural horror

Color Out of Space — sci-fi horror

Coma (2020) — sci-fi horror

Come Play — supernatural horror

Come to Daddy — slasher horror

Coven of Evil — supernatural horror

Crawlers — sci-fi horror

Cruel Peter — supernatural horror

The Current Occupant — sci-fi horror

The Curse of Audrey Earnshaw — supernatural horror

Cut Off — slasher horror

The Dark and the Wicked — supernatural horror

Dark Encounter — sci-fi horror

Darkness Falls (2020) — slasher horror

A Dark Path — supernatural horror

The Dark Red — supernatural horror

Dead by Dawn — slasher horror

A Deadly Legend — supernatural horror

Dead Sound (2020) — slasher horror

Death of Me — supernatural horror

The Deeper You Dig — supernatural horror

Delivered — slasher horror

Doctor Death — slasher horror

Dogs Don’t Wear Pants — slasher horror

Do Not Reply — slasher horror

Don’t Look Back (2020) — supernatural horror

Dreamkatcher — supernatural horror

The Empty Man — supernatural horror

Evil Eye (2020) — supernatural horror

Evil Little Things — supernatural horror

Exorcism at 60,000 Feet — supernatural horror

Extra Ordinary — supernatural horror

Freaky — sci-fi horror

Game of Death (2020) — supernatural horror

Get Gone — slasher horror

Good Boy — slasher horror

The Grudge (2020) — supernatural horror

Halloween Party (2020) — supernatural horror

Holland Road Massacre: The Legend of Pigman — slasher horror

Home With a View of the Monster — supernatural horror

The Honeymoon Phase — sci-fi horror

Host (2020) — supernatural horror

The Host (2020) — slasher horror

Hosts — slasher horror

Hubie Halloween — supernatural horror

The Hunt — slasher horror

Impetigore — supernatural horror

Infection (2020) — zombie horror

In the Trap — supernatural horror

The Invisible Man (2020) — sci-fi horror

It Cuts Deep — slasher horror

Jessica Forever — sci-fi horror

Killer Therapy — slasher horror

Lake of Death — supernatural horror

La Llorona — supernatural horror

Lingering — supernatural horror

The Lodge — supernatural horror

Love and Monsters — sci-fi horror

Luz: The Flower of Evil — slasher horror

The Marshes — supernatural horror

May the Devil Take You Too — supernatural horror

Metamorphosis (2020) — supernatural horror

Monstrum — supernatural horror

The Mortuary Collection — supernatural horror

Mrs. Serial Killer — slasher horror

Murder in the Woods (2020) — slasher horror

My Valentine — slasher horror

Nocturne (2020) — supernatural horror

A Nun’s Curse — supernatural horror

The Occupant — slasher horror

The Pale Door — slasher horror

The Platform — sci-fi horror

Pooka Lives! — sci-fi horror

Possessor Uncut — sci-fi horror

Psychosynthesis — sci-fi horror

Random Acts of Violence — slasher horror

Relic — supernatural horror

The Rental (2020) — slasher horror

Rent-A-Pal — slasher horror

Return to Splatter Farm — slasher horror

Roald Dahl’s The Witches — supernatural horror

Save Yourselves! — sci-fi horror comedy

Scare Me — supernatural horror

Scare Package — supernatural horror

Scream, Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street — documentary horror

Shortcut — supernatural horror

Skin Walker — supernatural horror

The Sonata — supernatural horror

Spell — supernatural horror

Spiral — supernatural horror

Spontaneous — sci-fi horror

Sputnik — sci-fi horror

Synchronic — supernatural horror

Tar — supernatural horror

Ten Minutes to Midnight  — vampire horror

Triggered — slasher horror

The Turning (2020) — supernatural horror

Uncaged (also titled Prey) – slasher horror

Uncle Peckerhead — supernatural horror

Underwater — sci-fi horror

Vampires vs. The Bronx — vampire horror

Warning: Do Not Play — supernatural horror

We Summon the Darkness — slasher horror

The Wolf of Snow Hollow — slasher horror

The Wretched — supernatural horror

You Die — supernatural horror

You Should Have Left — supernatural horror

Yummy — zombie horror

Z — supernatural horror

Zombi Child — zombie horror

 

Quibi goes out of business 6 months after launch

October 21, 2020

by Carla Hay

Quibi, the short-form streaming service whose name was short for “quick bites,” has announced that it’s shutting down, just six months after it was launched. Quibi had a reported $1 billion in investment capital; the leadership of former DreamWorks founder Jeffrey Katzenberg and former eBay CEO Meg Whitman; and a plethora of content from celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez, Reese Witherspoon, and LeBron James. However, it seems as if Quibi was doomed to fail for several reasons, even before its launch on April 6, 2020.

Katzenberg and Whitman announced Quibi’s permanent closure in an apologetic open letter on Medium on October 21, 2020. The letter read, in part: “Quibi was a big idea and there was no one who wanted to make a success of it more than we did. Our failure was not for lack of trying; we’ve considered and exhausted every option available to us … As a result we have reluctantly come to the difficult decision to wind down the business, return cash to our shareholders, and say goodbye to our colleagues with grace.” The letter also stated that Quibi will be “looking to sell its content and technology assets.”

Quibi’s subscription rate was $4.99 per month with ads or $7.99 per month without ads. Quibi did not offer annual subscriptions. For a limited time up until the day of the launch, Quibi offered a three-month free trial to customers. After the launch, the free trial was shortened to seven days. Perhaps out of desperation over its failure to meet subscription expectations, Quibi then extended the free trial to two weeks and then back to three months for new subscribers to the service.

Quibi aimed to set itself apart from other streaming services in four ways: Quibi’s content was delivered (1) in segments of 10 minutes or less; (2) on mobile devices only; (3) as original content only; and (4) in either portrait (vertically) or landscape (horizontal) format, with viewers being able to switch back and forth by moving the device to whichever format the viewer wanted, which is also known as turnstyle technology. Quibi was being sued by tech company Eko, which claims that Quibi stole trade secrets for this turnstyle technology. As of this writing, the lawsuit is still pending, although the outcome of the lawsuit will certainly be affected now that Quibi is longer in business.

The mobile-only aspect of Quibi’s service was the most controversial, since many customers complained that they wanted the option to watch Quibi content on desktop computers or on regular TV sets. After getting a lot of criticism for the mobile-only format, Quibi announced a few weeks after its launch that it would make its content available to watch on larger screens. However, this announcement was too little, too late. Furthermore, numerous Quibi customers complained about about not being able to take screenshots of Quibi content to share with other people.

Although Quibi launched during the COVID-19 pandemic, the pandemic cannot be completely blamed for the failure of Quibi. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic caused worldwide shutdowns in March 2020, Quibi was not getting a lot of audience buzz for its content. In addition, Quibi was targeting millennials (people born between 1980–2000) for its main base of subscribers, and it’s a demographic that is used to getting free online content as much as possible. Quibi’s short content made it look too much like YouTube, whose content is almost entirely free, thereby making Quibi a hard sell to potential subscribers.

The content on Quibi had a lot of star power, but got mixed-to-negative reviews from audiences and critics. Among the more high-profile shows on Quibi were “Chrissy’s Court,” starring supermodel Chrissy Teigen as a “judge” on a courtroom reality show; “Nikki Fre$h,” a comedic satire series starring Nicole Richie as the title character, a new-age wannabe rapper; and a reboot of the MTV prank reality series “Punk’d,” hosted by Chance the Rapper.

In addition, Quibi had original movies, but because they were delivered in short segments, they ended up looking like limited series. Quibi’s movies included the action thriller “Most Dangerous Game,” starring Liam Hemsworth and Christoph Waltz; the drama “Survive,” starring Sophie Turner and Corey Hawkins; and the comedy “Flipped,” starring Will Forte and Kaitlin Olson.

Lopez executive produced and appeared in one episode of the reality show “Thanks a Million,” which featured a different celebrity giving away $1 million in each episode. Witherspoon executive produced and narrated the animal docuseries “Fierce Queens,” which spotlighted female wild creatures. Basketball superstar James executive produced the docuseries “I Promise,” about his I Promise school, an elementary public school that he founded in 2018, in Akron, Ohio.

One of the few bright spots in Quibi’s short existence was that Quibi won two Primetime Emmys, both for the drama series “#FreeRayshawn.”  The series won Best Actor in a Short-Form Drama or Comedy Series (for Laurence Fishburne) and Best Actress in a Short-Form Drama or Comedy Series (for Jasmine Cephas-Jones).

AMC Networks partners with Adopt-A-Pet.com for FurFest adoption promotion

October 20, 2020

The following is a press release from AMC Networks:

AMC Networks today announced it has teamed up with Adopt-a-Pet.com, North America’s largest non-profit pet adoption website, for AMC’s annual horror marathon FearFest, to raise awareness for pet adoption with ‘FurFest.’ All month long, AMC, AMC+, and Shudder are encouraging viewers to support Adopt-a-Pet.com’s mission to end the overpopulation of companion animals in shelters and help pets find loving forever homes through custom, PET-tacular spots airing across linear, digital, and social channels.

The custom spots, featuring a few four-legged horror fans, encourage viewers to find their perfect watch buddies through adoptions and especially raise awareness for black cat and black dog adoptions this spooky season. Halloween may be the season for magical black cats, but in reality, they are most often left behind in shelters because of the color of their fur. Many animal welfare organizations call this “black cat syndrome,” with the phenomenon happening with black dogs as well. Through the collaboration, audiences are encouraged and inspired to help fight “black cat syndrome” by adopting these furry friends or by donating to Adopt-a-Pet.com. See the custom spot: 

“We all know that spooky season is best enjoyed with a buddy by your side, which is why we’re thrilled to join forces with Adopt-a-Pet.com to help viewers find their perfect four-legged watch companions,” said Linda Schupack, President of Marketing, AMC Networks Entertainment Group. “The movies on AMC’s FearFest and Shudder are already scary enough. How great to cuddle up with a lovely black cat or black dog for Halloween and beyond.”

“Teaming up with AMC Networks is an exciting and unique way to spread the word about pet adoption,” said Dana Puglisi, Chief Marketing Officer of Adopt-a-Pet.com. “We appreciate AMC and Shudder’s efforts to help get more pets into loving homes. And we love all the extra snuggles those newly adopted pets will receive while their people binge through the FearFest thrills!”

Now in its 24th consecutive year, AMC’s annual horror marathon FearFest brings the frights with an entire month of genre programming from iconic franchises like Halloween and Insidious, and the return of award-winning docuseries Eli Roth’s History of HorrorShudder, dubbed “the ultimate in streaming horror” by Newsweek, offers the best selection of original and classic horror, thriller and supernatural films and series, uncut and commercial free. Both are also now available as part of the new AMC+, a premium streaming bundle featuring only the good stuff, which also includes IFC Midnight’s best genre cinema from independent, foreign and documentary films. In addition to the largest slate of classic horror movies such as Friday the 13th and Halloween, AMC+ also includes all series within The Walking Dead Universe, as well as AMC’s Eli Roth’s History of Horror, and new Shudder programming, such as Joe Bob’s Halloween Hideaway Special and A Creepshow Animated Special, and much more.

See the full FearFest lineup.


Find the Best in Horror at Shudder.

About AMC Networks

Known for its groundbreaking and celebrated original content, AMC Networks is the company behind the award-winning brands AMC, BBC AMERICA, IFC, SundanceTV, WE tv, and IFC Films. Its diverse line-up of popular and critically-acclaimed series and independent films include Killing EveBetter Call Saul and The Walking Dead, which has been the #1 show on ad-supported cable television for ten consecutive years, as well as PortlandiaBrockmireLove After Lockup, and the films BoyhoodDeath of Stalin, and many more. Its original series Mad Men and Breaking Bad are widely recognized as being among the most influential and acclaimed shows in the history of TV. The Company also operates AMC Studios, its production business; AMC Networks International, its international programming business; the subscription streaming services Acorn TV, Shudder, Sundance Now, and UMC; and Levity Entertainment Group, the Company’s production services and comedy venues business. For more information, visit http://www.amcnetworks.com.

About Shudder

AMC Networks’ Shudder is a premium streaming video service, super-serving members with the best selection in genre entertainment, covering horror, thrillers and the supernatural. Shudder’s expanding library of film, TV series, and originals is available on most streaming devices in the US, Canada, the UK, Ireland, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. For a 7-day, risk-free trial, visit ​www.shudder.com​.

About Adopt-a-Pet.com

Adopt-a-Pet.com is North America’s largest non-profit pet adoption website, helping over 19,000 animal shelters, humane societies, SPCAs, pet rescue groups, and pet adoption agencies advertise their purebred and mixed breed pets for free to millions of adopters each month. Sponsored by companies including Purina, Chewy, and Elanco Animal Health LLC, Adopt-a-Pet.com helps homeless dogs, cats, and even rabbits and other animals go from alone to adopted.

Hulu announces premiere of ‘Eater’s Guide to the World,’ narrated by Maya Rudolph

October 20, 2020

Hulu has released the trailer and photos from the documentary series “Eater’s Guide to the World.” All seven episodes of the first season will premiere on November 11, 2020.

Here is Hulu’s synopsis of the show:

Discover the most surprising culinary destinations in “Eater’s Guide to the World.” Join narrator Maya Rudolph on a quest to find the most unexpected places to score an epic meal, while drinking and dining with the locals along the way.

Season 1, Episode 101: “Dining Alone in the Pacific Northwest

The best part of dining solo? You can focus on what deserves your attention most — the food. Time to eat your way through the Pacific Northwest, savoring the juicy pork steak, soba noodles, and piping hot fried chicken.

Season 1, Episode 102: “Cultural Crossroads in Casablanca”

No cool friend would let you skip Casablanca while on a trip to Morocco. This can’t-miss port city boasts snails, traditional pastilla, and unreal tagine — you’ve gotta taste it all.

Season 1, Episode 103: “The Ass Crack of Dawn in New York City”

It’s last call and you’re freakin’ hungry. What the f*** do you do? Luckily, you’re in New York City, where your crew can choose from mouth-watering options like Korean BBQ, empanadas, and birria — all before the sun hits the horizon.

Season 1, Episode 104: “Jungle to Table in Costa Rica”

The Costa Rican jungle is basically nature’s candy store, and we’d like to invite you in. Bursting with delicious guanabana, cainito, cas, pejibaye, and of course cacao — known to some as the fruit of the gods! Of the GODS, y’all!

Season 1, Episode 105: “Eating on the Hood of Your Car in LA”

Buckle tf up! When you’re in LA, your car’s your sanctuary. Treat it with the respect it deserves, and dig in to life-changing hot chicken, fresh bread drops, and museum-worthy bento boxes in its presence.

Season 1, Episode 106: “Planting Roots in Tijuana Mexico”

Local, regular, newcomer — whoever you are, Tijuana has something delicious for you to eat. Grab a seat and try the craft beer, pork belly tacos, Caesar salad (trust us) and yeah, you’ll want to stay awhile.

Season 1, Episode 107: “Taking Off in America”

You eat at an airport because you have to, not because you want to. But just beyond the departure terminals you’ll find smoky BBQ, sweet n’ fluffy pancakes and a bowl of warm borbor—all worth going the extra mile.

True Crime Entertainment: What’s New This Week

The following content is generally available worldwide, except where otherwise noted. All TV shows listed are for networks and streaming services based in the United States. All movies listed are those released in U.S. cinemas. This schedule is for content and events premiering this week and does not include content that has already been made available.

Monday, October 19 – Sunday, October 25

TV/Streaming Services

All times listed are Eastern Time/Pacific Time, unless otherwise noted.

Netflix’s docuseries “Unsolved Mysteries” (Volume 2) premieres on Monday, October 19 at 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT.

Monday, October 19

“Unsolved Mysteries”
(Episodes 101-106) **Season Premiere**
Monday, October 19, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Netflix

“Last Looks”
(Episode 108) 
Monday, October 19, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Murder Unboxed”
(Episodes 101) **Series Premiere**
Monday, October 19, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“World’s Most Evil Killers”
“Monster of Marcinelle”
Monday, October 19, 9 a.m., Reelz

“World’s Most Evil Killers”
“Barber of Potenza”
Monday, October 19, 10 a.m., Reelz

“World’s Most Evil Killers”
“Trick Driver Killers”
Monday, October 19, 11 a.m., Reelz

“Fatal Attraction”
“When a Killer Goes Free” (Audrey Scott) (Episode 1012) 
Monday, October 19, 9 p.m., TV One

“The Missing”
“Missing Teens” (Episode 105) 
Monday, October 19, 9 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“The Missing”
“Night Out Gone Wrong” (Episode 106) **Season Finale**
Monday, October 19, 9:30 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“Killer Carnies”
“The Sideshow Murders” (Episode 101) **Series Premiere**
Monday, October 19, 10 p.m., Investigation Discovery

Tuesday, October 20

“Last Looks”
(Episode 109) 
Tuesday, October 20, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Murder Unboxed”
(Episodes 102) 
Tuesday, October 20, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Homicide City”
“Deadly Circle of Friends” (Episode 306)
Tuesday, October 20, 9 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“Dead Silent”
“Quiet the Dog” (Episode 401) **Season Premiere**
Tuesday, October 20, 10 p.m., Investigation Discovery

Wednesday, October 21

“Last Looks”
(Episode 110) 
Wednesday, October 21, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Murder Unboxed”
(Episodes 103) 
Wednesday, October 21, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Crimes Gone Viral”
“No You Don’t!” (Episode 113)
Wednesday, October 21, 9 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“Crimes Gone Viral”
“Out of Control” (Episode 114)
Wednesday, October 21, 9:30 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“Chaos in Court”
“Enough Is Enough (Episode 106)
Wednesday, October 21, 10 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“The Con”
“The Heiress Con” (Episode 102)
Wednesday, October 24, 10 p.m., ABC

Thursday, October 22

“Last Looks”
(Episode 111) 
Monday, October 19, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Murder Unboxed”
(Episodes 104) 
Thursday, October 22, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Buried in the Backyard”
“Buried in the Woods:  Girl in the Grave” (Episode 308)
Thursday, October 22, 8 p.m., Oxygen

“Injustice With Nancy Grace”
“Friend or Foe?” (Episode 203) 
Thursday, October 22, 9 p.m., Oxygen

“Suspicious Minds”
“Who Killed the Councilman” (Episode 103)
Thursday, October 22, 9 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“The Killer Beside Me”
“Schooled in Murder” (Episode 306) **Series Premiere**
Thursday, October 22, 10 p.m., Investigation Discovery

Friday, October 23

“Last Looks”
(Episode 112) 
Friday, October 23, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Murder Unboxed”
(Episodes 105) 
Friday, October 23, 3 a.m. ET/12 a.m. PT, Quibi

“Dateline: Secrets Uncovered”
“The Unusual Suspect”
Friday, October 23, 8 p.m., Oxygen

“20/20”
Friday, October 23, 10 p.m., ABC

“Dateline”
Friday, October 23, 10 p.m., NBC

“American Greed: Bonus Edition”
“Operation Crook, Line and Sinker”
Friday, October 23, 10 p.m., CNBC

Saturday, October 24

“License to Kill”
“Nursing Home Nightmares” (Episode 212)
Saturday, October 24, 6 p.m., Oxygen

Sunday, October 25

“Snapped”
“Nancy Siegel” (Episode 2808)
Sunday, October 25, 6 p.m., Oxygen

“Judgment With Ashleigh Banfield”
(Episode 107)
Sunday, October 25, 8 p.m., Court TV

“Evil Lives Here”
“The Found Them in Storage” (Episode 808) **Season Finale**
Sunday, October 25, 9 p.m., Investigation Discovery

“Seduced: Inside the NXIVM Cult”
“Indoctrinated” (Episode 102)
Sunday, October 25, 9 p.m., Starz

Movies in Theaters or on Home Video

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, numerous movie theaters in the U.S. are closed until further notice. Some independent movie theaters that are physically closed are showing movies online, as part of a “virtual cinema” program. 

“The State of Texas Vs. Melissa”

Directed by Sabrina Van Tassel

Release date: October 20, 2020 on digital and VOD

“The State of Texas vs. Melissa” explores the life journey of Melissa Lucio, the first Hispanic woman to be sentenced to death in the state of Texas. For 10 years, she has been awaiting her fate—and she now faces her last appeal.

Radio/Podcasts

The following content is generally available worldwide, except where otherwise noted. All TV shows listed are for networks and streaming services based in the United States. All movies listed are those released in U.S. cinemas. This schedule is for content and events premiering this week and does not include content that has already been made available.

No true-crime podcast series debuting this week.

Events

Events listed here are not considered endorsements by this website. All ticket buyers with questions or concerns about the event should contact the event promoter or ticket seller directly.

All start times listed are local time, unless otherwise noted.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, most in-person events in the U.S. have been cancelled or postponed if the event was expecting at least 50 people in the year 2020.

No true-crime events this week.

2020 Billboard Music Awards: Post Malone is the top winner

October 14, 2020

Post Malone at the 2020 Billboard Music Awards at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles (Photo by Todd Williamson/NBC)

The following is a press release from Dick Clark Productions and NBC:

Post Malone swept the “2020 Billboard Music Awards” (BBMAs), winning a total of nine awards, including Top Artist and Top Male Artist – the most of the evening – bringing his total number of BBMA wins to 10. Echoing the theme of “Music Unites All’ throughout the night Malone said “music can bring everyone together, it’s absolutely incredible.” Airing tonight from the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, the BBMAs opened with an unforgettable performance by three-time host Kelly Clarkson, who brought down the house with Whitney Houston’s version of “Higher Love,” joined by two-time BBMA nominees Pentatonix and queen of percussion Sheila E. 

Khalid followed Post Malone for the most wins of the night with five, including Top R&B Artist, Top R&B Album, and Top R&B Song. Lil Nas X and Billy Ray Cyrus tied for the third most wins, with both artists recognized for their hit “Old Town Road” in the Top Hot 100 Song, Top Streaming Song, Top Selling Song, and Top Rap Song categories. Billie Eilish took home three awards including Top New Artist and Top Female Artist. Winners in the fan-voted categories were: BTS (Top Social Artist), Shawn Mendes and Camila Cabello’s “Señorita” (Top Collaboration) and Harry Styles (Billboard Chart Achievement Award).

Rapper and social activist Killer Mike was honored with the inaugural Billboard Change Maker Award from the historic APEX (African American Panoramic Experience) Museum in Atlanta, GA. The award, which honors an artist or group that speaks truth to power through music, celebrity, and community and is active in their community and charitable with time, money, or influence to improve the lives of others, was presented by Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms. NBC and MRC teamed up to deposit $1M to Killer Mike’s recently established digital bank, Greenwood.  

Cher made an appearance on the star-studded night to present Garth Brooks with the elite ICON Award, followed by his incredible performance of multiple chart-topping hits that was nothing short of iconic.

The night was full of spectacular performances: 

  • All the way from South Korea, K-Pop supergroup BTS gave an electrifying performance of “Dynamite,” their first No. 1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
  • Demi Lovato gave a chills inducing world premiere performance of her timely and powerful new song “Commander in Chief” 
  • Post Malone delivered a soaring performance of his hits “Circles” and “Tommy Lee” featuring Tyla Yahweh, showing everyone why he took home nine awards
  • Alicia Keys made a long-awaited return to the BBMA stage for a dazzling perform of her latest single “Love Looks Better” 
  • Brandy made her BBMA performance debut and treated fans to her hit “Borderline” along with her new single “No Tomorrow” featuring Ty Dolla $ign, and “Almost Doesn’t Count” 
  • Bad Bunny was joined by surprise guests Nesi and Ivy Queen for “Yo Perreo Sola” for his dynamic and exciting BBMA performance debut
  • In her first BBMA performance, Doja Cat set the stage aflame with a dramatic medley of “Juicy,” “Say So,” and “Like That” 
  • EGOT-winner and multi-platinum singer-songwriter John Legend gave an emotional performance of “Never Break” 
  • Kane Brown, Khalid and Swae Lee tore up the stage with an energetic performance of their hit “Be Like That” 
  • In a rare appearance, Sia delivered a powerful moment with her song “Courage to Change” 
  • On the heels of one of his three wins, Luke Combs gave a moving performance of “Better Together” 
  • Breakout artist SAINt JHN, in his television debut, performed his global smash hit “Roses” 
  • And in this year’s Billboard throwback, iconic group En Vogue closed the evening with an empowering performance of their huge hit “Free Your Mind,” which first stormed the charts 30 years ago

In a tribute to legendary guitarist, musician, and songwriter Eddie Van Halen, the show featured a clip from the 2015 BBMAs when his son Wolfgang took the stage with him for a rare live tv performance. Presenters throughout the evening included Addison Rae, Cher, Garcelle Beauvais, Jane Lynch, Jay Ellis, Jharrel Jerome, Julia Michaels, Lilly Singh, Nicole Richie, Spencer X, Taraji P. Henson, TwinsthenewTrend (Fred & Tim Williams), and tWitch.

“Billboard Music Awards” nominees and winners are based on key fan interactions with music, including album and digital song sales, streaming, radio airplay, touring and social engagement, tracked by Billboard and its data partners, including MRC Data/Nielsen Music. The awards are based on the chart period of March 23, 2019, through March 14, 2020. Since 1940, the Billboard charts have been the go-to guide for ranking the popularity of artists, songs and albums, and are the ultimate measure of success in music.

The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” are sponsored by TikTok and Xfinity. The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” are produced by dick clark productions. Amy Thurlow, Mark Bracco, Barry Adelman, Linda Gierahn, Kelly Clarkson, and Robert Deaton are executive producers.

For the latest news on the Billboard Music Awards (BBMAs) visit billboardmusicawards.com and  www.billboard.com/bbma. For exclusive content and more, be sure to follow the BBMAs on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok, YouTube) and join the conversation by using the official hashtag for the show, #BBMAs.

About Dick Clark Productions:
Dick Clark Productions (DCP) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Golden Globe Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest,” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and DCP. DCP also owns one of the world’s most extensive and unique entertainment archive libraries with more than 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances, and legendary programming. DCP is part of MRC Live & Alternative, a division of diversified global entertainment company MRC. For additional information, visit www.mrcentertainment.com


Here is the complete list of nominations and winners:

*=winner

ARTIST AWARDS

Top Artist:
Billie Eilish
Jonas Brothers
Khalid
Post Malone*
Taylor Swift

Top New Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish*
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Roddy Ricch

Billboard Chart Achievement Award (Fan Voted):
Mariah Carey
Luke Combs
Lil Nas X
Harry Styles*
Taylor Swift

Top Male Artist:
DaBaby
Khalid
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*
Ed Sheeran

Top Female Artist:
Billie Eilish*
Ariana Grande
Halsey
Lizzo
Taylor Swift

Top Duo/Group:
BTS
Dan + Shay
Jonas Brothers*
Maroon 5
Panic! At The Disco

Top Billboard 200 Artist:
Drake
Billie Eilish
Khalid
Post Malone*
Taylor Swift

Top Hot 100 Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish
Khalid
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*

Top Streaming Songs Artist:
DaBaby
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*
Travis Scott

Top Song Sales Artist:
Billie Eilish
Lil Nas X
Lizzo*
Post Malone
Taylor Swift

Top Radio Songs Artist:
Jonas Brothers*
Khalid
Lizzo
Shawn Mendes
Post Malone

Top Social Artist (Fan Voted):
BTS*
Billie Eilish
EXO
GOT7
Ariana Grande

Top Touring Artist:
Elton John
Metallica
P!nk*
The Rolling Stones
Ed Sheeran

Top R&B Artist:
Chris Brown
Khalid*
Lizzo
Summer Walker
The Weeknd

Top R&B Male Artist:
Chris Brown
Khalid*
The Weeknd

Top R&B Female Artist:
Beyoncé
Lizzo
Summer Walker*

Top R&B Tour:
B2K
Janet Jackson
Khalid*

Top Rap Artist:
DaBaby
Juice WRLD
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*
Roddy Ricch

Top Rap Male Artist:
DaBaby
Lil Nas X
Post Malone*

Top Rap Female Artist:
Cardi B*
City Girls
Megan Thee Stallion

Top Rap Tour:
Drake
Post Malone*
Travis Scott

Top Country Artist:
Kane Brown
Luke Combs*
Dan + Shay
Maren Morris
Thomas Rhett

Top Country Male Artist:
Kane Brown
Luke Combs*
Thomas Rhett

Top Country Female Artist:
Maren Morris*
Kacey Musgraves
Carrie Underwood

Top Country Duo/Group:
Dan + Shay*
Florida Georgia Line
Old Dominion

Top Country Tour:
Eric Church
Florida Georgia Line
George Strait*

Top Rock Artist:
Imagine Dragons
Panic! At The Disco*
Tame Impala
Tool
twenty one pilots

Top Rock Tour:
Elton John*
Metallica
The Rolling Stones

Top Latin Artist:
Anuel AA
Bad Bunny*
J Balvin
Ozuna
Romeo Santos

Top Dance/Electronic Artist:
Avicii
The Chainsmokers*
DJ Snake
Illenium
Marshmello

Top Christian Artist:
Lauren Daigle*
Elevation Worship
for KING & COUNTRY
Hillsong UNITED
Kanye West

Top Gospel Artist:
Kirk Franklin
Koryn Hawthorne
Tasha Cobbs Leonard
Sunday Service Choir
Kanye West*

ALBUM AWARDS

Top Billboard 200 Album:
Billie Eilish “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?”*
Ariana Grande “thank u, next”
Khalid “Free Spirit”
Post Malone “Hollywood’s Bleeding”
Taylor Swift “Lover”

Top Soundtrack:
“Aladdin”
“Descendants 3”
“Frozen II”*
“K-12” by Melanie Martinez 
“The Dirt” by Mötley Crüe

Top R&B Album:
Beyoncé “Homecoming: The Live Album”
Justin Bieber “Changes”
Chris Brown “Indigo”
Khalid “Free Spirit”*
Summer Walker “Over It”

Top Rap Album:
DaBaby “KIRK”
Juice WRLD “Death Race For Love”
Post Malone “Hollywood’s Bleeding”*
Roddy Ricch “Please Excuse Me for Being Antisocial”
Young Thug “So Much Fun”

Top Country Album:
Kane Brown “Experiment”
Luke Combs “What You See Is What You Get”*
Maren Morris “GIRL”
Thomas Rhett “Center Point Road”
Morgan Wallen “If I Know Me”

Top Rock Album:
The Lumineers “III”
Slipknot “We Are Not Your Kind”
Tame Impala “The Slow Rush”
Tool “Fear Inoculum”*
Vampire Weekend “Father of the Bride”

Top Latin Album:
J Balvin & Bad Bunny “Oasis”*
Farruko “Gangalee”
Maluma “11:11”
Romeo Santos “Utopía”
Sech “Sueños”

Top Dance/Electronic Album:
Avicii “TIM”
The Chainsmokers “World War Joy”
Illenium “Ascend”
Marshmello “Marshmello: Fortnite Extended Set”*
Alan Walker “Different World”

Top Christian Album:
Bethel Music “Victory: Recorded Live”
Casting Crowns “Only Jesus”
Hillsong UNITED “People”
Skillet “Victorious”
Kanye West “Jesus is King”*

Top Gospel AlbumL
Kirk Franklin “Long Live Love”
Donald Lawrence & The Tri-City Singers “Goshen”
William McDowell “The Cry: A Live Worship Experience”
Sunday Service Choir “Jesus Is Born”
Kanye West “Jesus is King”*

SONG AWARDS

Top Hot 100 Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello “Señorita”

Top Streaming Song:
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lil Tecca “Ran$om”
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”

Top Selling Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Billie Eilish “bad guy”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Blake Shelton “God’s Country”

Top Radio Song:
Lewis Capaldi “Someone You Loved”
Jonas Brothers “Sucker”*
Khalid “Talk”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Ed Sheeran & Justin Bieber “I Don’t Care”

Top Collaboration (Fan Voted):
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”
Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello “Señorita”*
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”
Ed Sheeran & Justin Bieber “I Don’t Care”

Top R&B Song:
Chris Brown ft. Drake “No Guidance”
Doja Cat & Tyga “Juicy”
Khalid “Talk”*
Lizzo “Good As Hell”
The Weeknd “Heartless”

Top Rap Song:
Lil Nas X ft. Billy Ray Cyrus “Old Town Road”*
Lil Tecca “Ran$om”
Lizzo “Truth Hurts”
Post Malone & Swae Lee “Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)”
Post Malone “Wow.”

Top Country Song:
Dan + Shay with Justin Bieber “10,000 Hours”*
Maren Morris “The Bones”
Old Dominion “One Man Band”
Blake Shelton “God’s Country”
Morgan Wallen “Whiskey Glasses”

Top Rock Song:
Imagine Dragons “Bad Liar”
Machine Gun Kelly x YUNGBLUD x Travis Barker “I Think I’m Okay”
Panic! At The Disco “Hey Look Ma, I Made It”*
twenty one pilots “Chlorine”
twenty one pilots “The Hype”

Top Latin Song:
Anuel AA, Daddy Yankee, Karol G, Ozuna & J Balvin “China”
Bad Bunny & Tainy “Callaita”
Daddy Yankee ft. Snow “Con Calma”*
Jhay Cortez, J Balvin, & Bad Bunny “No Me Conoce”
Sech ft. Darell, Nicky Jam, Ozuna, Anuel AA “Otro Trago”

Top Dance/Electronic Song:
Black Eyed Peas x J Balvin “Ritmo (Bad Boys For Life)”
Ellie Goulding x Diplo ft. Swae Lee “Close To Me”*
Illenium & Jon Bellion “Good Things Fall Apart”
Kygo x Whitney Houston “Higher Love”
Marshmello ft. CHVRCHES “Here With Me”

Top Christian Song:
Bethel Music, Jonathan David Helser & Melissa Helser “Raise A Hallelujah”
Casting Crowns ft. Matthew West “Nobody”
Lauren Daigle “Rescue”
for KING & COUNTRY “God Only Knows”*
Kanye West “Follow God”

Top Gospel Song:
Kirk Franklin “Love Theory”
Kanye West “Closed on Sunday”
Kanye West “Follow God”*
Kanye West “On God”
Kanye West “Selah”

Review: ‘Time’ (2020), starring Fox Rich

October 14, 2020

by Carla Hay

Fox Rich and Rob Rich in “Time” (Photo courtesy of Amazon Studios)

“Time” (2020)

Directed by Garrett Bradley

Culture Representation: Taking place from the 1990s to the 2010s, the documentary “Time” features a predominantly African American group of working-class and middle-class people discussing Louisiana woman Fox Rich’s quest to get her husband Rob released from prison and reunited with his family.

Culture Clash: Rob Rich was sentenced to 60 years in prison without the possibility of parole for a botched armed robbery, which is a sentence that Fox Rich and others in the documentary say is a punishment that is too harsh for the crime and rooted in racism.

Culture Audience: “Time” will appeal primarily to people who are interested in documentaries about people who battle against systemic racism in the U.S. criminal justice system.

Fox Rich in the 1990s (above) and Fox Rich in the 2010s (below) in “Time” (Photo courtesy of Amazon Studios)

The gripping and emotionally moving documentary “Time” doesn’t follow the usual formula in a movie about someone on an against-all-odds quest to get someone else released from prison. The convict in this case isn’t someone who proclaims to be innocent of the crime. Nor is there a crusading lawyer who is the hero of the story. Instead, this movie takes a raw and intimate look at the journey of a convict’s wife named Fox Rich, who fights to get her husband Rob G. Rich freed from prison while he’s serving a 60-year sentence without the possibility of parole. It’s a story that’s a true example of extraordinary persistence, love and hope.

“Time” is director Garrett Bradley’s feature-film debut, but the movie consists of a great deal of video footage that Fox Rich filmed herself during the family’s ordeal that began in the late 1990s and continued through 2018. In the movie, she also has the names Sibil Verdette Fox (which is her birth name) and Sibil Richardson. Fox (who was born in 1971) does most of the voiceover narration in “Time,” but most of the six sons she had with Rob also narrate the film.

There are no “talking head” legal experts, journalists or other pundits who are interviewed in this documentary. “Time” is essentially a family video album that chronicles the ups and downs of Fox’s determination to emancipate her husband over the course of 21 years. Although the original footage from the early years was filmed in color, everything in “Time” is entirely in black and white. There’s also some footage of the family in happier times before Rob was incarcerated.

The movie is not shown in chronological order, and the year that footage was taken is not shown on screen, although the year is sometimes mentioned by the people in the footage. Viewers can also tell the periods of time that the footage was filmed by how Fox looks and the ages of the children. In the 1990s and early 2000s footage, Fox’s is wavy-haired and more idealistic. In the later footage, her hair is straight and she’s more realistic but still hopeful. She’s also become a businesswoman at a car dealership, as well as a passionate public speaker about reforms in the criminal justice system. In her public speaking, Fox shares her personal stories about how Rob’s incarceration has affected the family.

What happened to cause this prison sentence to devastate the family? In 1997, Fox and Rob were a married couple in their mid-20s who met when they were in high school. They were on their way to living the American Dream, with three sons, their first purchased home and a plan to open the first hip-hop clothing store in Shreveport, Louisiana.

But, as Fox tells it in the documentary, they ran into financial problems in trying to launch the business. And they got desperate. On September 16, 1997, their lives changed forever when they committed this crime: Rob, Fox and Rob’s nephew robbed the Grambling Credit Union in Grambling Credit Union in Grambling, Louisiana. Fox says she remembers that her motivation for committing the crime was she didn’t want the business to fail and she was going to do what it took to get the money that they wanted.

Fox was the getaway driver, while Rob and his nephew committed the botched armed robbery in the bank. They ended up with about $5,000 from the robbery, but they were quickly apprehended and pleaded guilty. While Fox pleaded guilty and was sentenced to five years in prison (she was released from prison after serving three-and-a-half years of that sentence), Rob lost out on a plea bargain where he would be sentenced to 12 years in prison if he pleaded guilty. Instead, through some bad luck and bad legal advice that are not detailed in the movie, he ended up facing trial and was sentenced to 60 years in prison. By any standard, it’s a very harsh sentence, considering that there are many people who get lesser sentences for murder or rape.

Just like many other people who think the U.S. criminal justice system is corrupt and flawed, Fox believes that the system is very racist, because people of color are more likely to get worse punishments than white people who commit the same crimes. She comments in the documentary: “Our prison system is nothing more than slavery. And I see myself as an abolitionist.”

Fox’s mother, a retired educator who’s not identified by her name in the movie, also says that prisons are another form of slavery. She doesn’t excuse the crime that Rob and Fox committed that landed the spouses in prison, but she believes that Rob’s punishment should have fit the crime. She says, “I’ve always been a firm believer: Right don’t come to you doing wrong.”

Fox’s mother also adds that she always thought her daughter would marry “a doctor or a lawyer or an Indian chief.” She comments, “I’ve got nothing against Rob. I just don’t know him.” Viewers also don’t really get to know Rob either, since Fox doesn’t really describe what her husband’s personality is like, and the movie only shows brief snippets of her talking to him on the phone while he’s in the Louisiana State Penitentiary, also known as Angola.

However, “Life” does have a lot of footage over the years of Fox with her and Rob’s six children, who are all sons: Mahlik, Remington (also known as Remi), Laurence, Justus, Freedom, and Rob II. Justus and Freedom (who are identical twins) and Rob II were born while Rob Sr. was in prison. The most heartbreaking parts of the movie have to do with the children not being able to grow up with their father in the home.

But the movie also has plenty of inspirational moments. Defying the negative stereotype that children of prison inmates are doomed to become uneducated criminals, Mahlik, Remi and Laurence (the three oldest sons) are all college-educated and thriving. Remi is shown graduating from dental school. Laurence graduated from high school two years earlier than his classmates and is shown to be an aspiring law student who wants to become a public advocate for criminal justice reform.

Remi comments in the documentary: “My family has a strong image, but hiding behind it is a lot of pain … Time is influenced by a lot of our emotions. It’s influenced by our actions.”

And Fox is the most inspirational of all, with her steely determination to never give up on her goal to get Rob out of prison and reunited with his family. There are moments of despair, hope, defeat and triumph. “Time” shows how Fox evolved into a charismatic public speaker, whether she gives speeches at places like Tulane University or stands up in front of a church audience and asks for forgiveness for the crime she committed.

In one of these speeches, Fox also mentions that she made amends with some of the bank robbery victims when she met with them personally to ask for their forgiveness. In private, she gives pep talks to Rob, their kids and to herself. And she’s often seen on the phone doing what she has to do to get Rob back home with the family.

One thing that might surprise people who watch this movie is that there is very little footage of any lawyers. There’s a brief scene of Fox in a meeting with attorneys in an office, but that’s about it. There are hints that Fox has become disillusioned with lawyers and the legal system in general, because she does as much as she can on her own. Fox says at one point in the movie that she paid a previous lawyer (whose name is not mentioned) about $15,000 in cash for his services, and he ended up telling the family that there was nothing he could do for Rob.

Besides being entirely in black and white, “Time” isn’t a conventional documentary about the U.S. criminal justice system because of director Bradley’s musical choices for the movie. There is no cliché musical score with rousing orchestral music, no traditional gospel songs that chime in at emotionally charged moments, no stereotypical hip-hop music with angry anthems. Instead, the jazzy score by Edwin Montgomery and Jamieson Shaw (taken mainly from 1960s piano compositions by Ethiopian nun Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou) is a lot like the frequently meandering tone of this film: “Time” flows along with no distinct “acts” or “chapters” because of the non-chronological order of the film.

However, there is a “crescendo” to the film that is an absolute must-see. People who know the Rich family’s story might already know how this film ends, but that doesn’t lessen the impact of seeing certain defining moments captured in this film. As Fox says at one point in the movie, “I came from a people who had a strong desire to have something, to make something of ourselves.” Her unshakeable loyalty to her husband and family in the face of overwhelming obstacles can be an unforgettable inspiration to people who believe in the power of love and the human spirit.

Amazon Studios released “Time” in select U.S. cinemas on October 9, 2020. Amazon Prime Video will premiere the movie on October 16, 2020.

2020 Billboard Music Awards: performers and presenters announced

October 14, 2020

 
Kelly Clarkson (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images for iHeartMedia)

The following is a press release from Dick Clark Productions and NBC:

WHO:
Host and opening performer Kelly Clarkson will be joined by Pentatonix and Sheila E. Additional performers include Alicia Keys, Bad Bunny, Brandy featuring Ty Dolla $ign, BTS, Kane Brown featuring Swae Lee and Khalid, Luke Combs, Doja Cat, En Vogue, John Legend, Demi Lovato, Sia, Post Malone featuring Tyla Yahweh, and SAINt JHN. Garth Brooks will receive the elite ICON Award. Mayor of Atlanta Keisha Lance Bottoms will present rapper and social activist Killer Mike with the inaugural Billboard Change Maker Award. Presenters include Addison Rae, Cher, Garcelle Beauvais, Jane Lynch, Jay Ellis, Jharrel Jerome, Julia Michaels, Lilly Singh, Nicole Richie, Spencer X, Taraji P. Henson, TwinsthenewTrend and tWitch.

WHAT:
The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” is hosted by three-time Billboard Music Award host Kelly Clarkson and airs live on NBC on Wednesday, Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. ET/PT from the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles.

The three-hour live telecast will showcase this year’s hottest musical acts, unexpected collaborations and buzzworthy moments. “Billboard Music Awards” nominees and winners are based on key fan interactions with music, including album and digital song sales, streaming, radio airplay, touring and social engagement, tracked by Billboard and its data partners, including MRC Data/Nielsen Music. The awards are based on the chart period of March 23, 2019 through March 14, 2020. Since 1940, the Billboard charts have been the go-to guide for ranking the popularity of artists, songs and albums, and are the ultimate measure of success in music.

The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” are sponsored by TikTok and Xfinity. The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” is produced by Dick Clark Productions. Amy Thurlow, Mark Bracco, Barry Adelman, Linda Gierahn, Kelly Clarkson and Robert Deaton are executive producers.

WHEN:         
The “2020 Billboard Music Awards” airs Wednesday, October 14 at 8 p.m. ET/PT on NBC.

MORE:
About Dick Clark Productions:
Dick Clark Productions (DCP) is the world’s largest producer and proprietor of televised live event entertainment programming with the “Academy of Country Music Awards,” “American Music Awards,” “Billboard Music Awards,” “Golden Globe Awards,” “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest” and the “Streamy Awards.” Weekly television programming includes “So You Think You Can Dance” from 19 Entertainment and DCP. DCP also owns one of the world’s most extensive and unique entertainment archive libraries with more than 60 years of award-winning shows, historic programs, specials, performances and legendary programming. DCP is part of MRC Live & Alternative, a division of diversified global entertainment company MRC. For additional information, visit www.mrcentertainment.com

Review: ‘Evil Eye’ (2020), starring Sarita Choudhury, Sunita Mani, Omar Maskati and Bernard White

October 13, 2020

by Carla Hay

Omar Maskati and Sunita Mani in “Evil Eye” (Photo by Alfonso Bresciani/Amazon Studios)

“Evil Eye” (2020)

Directed by Elan Dassani and Rajeev Dassani

Culture Representation: Taking place in New Orleans and Delhi, India, the horror film “Evil Eye” features a predominantly Indian cast (with a few white people) representing the middle-class.

Culture Clash: A married, middle-aged mother, who experienced domestic abuse from an ex-boyfriend when she was younger, fears that her abuser has been reincarnated in the man whom her daughter is currently dating.

Culture Audience: “Evil Eye” will appeal primarily to people who are interested in horror movies that have characters and storylines focused on Indian culture and family generational issues.

Bernard White and Sarita Choudhury in “Evil Eye” (Photo by Alfonso Bresciani/Amazon Studios)

For better or worse, it’s become a cliché that a great deal of movies with predominantly Indian casts are about families preoccupied with the wedding or marriage of the young adults in the family. Most Indians who follow tradition have arranged marriages where members of the family play matchmaker. The horror film “Evil Eye” adds a cultural blend to this formula by having the story set in two places (the Indian city of Delhi and the American city of New Orleans) that represent the push-and-pull conflict of wanting to follow family tradition and wanting to lead a more modern, independent life. “Evil Eye” might disappoint people who are expecting more action scenes, but the movie is commendable as a sobering reflection on domestic abuse and parents’ fears that their children might be doomed to repeat the same mistakes that the parents made.

“Evil Eye” is part of Blumhouse Television’s “Welcome to the Blumhouse” series partnership with Amazon Prime Video to showcase horror/thriller movies directed by women and people of color. Directed by identical twins Elan Dassani and Rajeev Dassani, “Evil Eye” is based on the Audible Original production of the same name by Madhuri Shekar, who wrote the “Evil Eye” screenplay. The audible version of “Evil Eye” centered on a series of phone conversations between an Indian mother and her daughter over the mother’s worries about the daughter’s love life and when she’s going to get married.

The movie version of “Evil Eye” obviously goes beyond those phone conversations to  actually show the two different worlds and outlooks on life that the mother and daughter have in the story. In the “Evil Eye” movie, Usha (played by Sarita Choudhury) is a happily married mother who is constantly pressuring her daughter Pallavi (played by Sunita Mani) to find a nice man to marry, preferably someone who is also of Indian heritage. Years ago, Usha and her laid-back and pragmatic husband Krishnan (played by Bernard White) immigrated from India to New Orleans, where they raised Pallavi, but the couple moved back to India some years ago because Krishnan (who’s a science professor) was offered a great job at a university.

Despite living so far apart, Usha and Pallavi communicate with each other on a regular basis. Lately though, their relationship has become strained because Pallavi thinks that Usha is putting too much pressure on her to get married. Pallavi is not opposed to the idea of getting married, but she’s not in a rush to find a husband and she would rather do it on her own terms.

Usha is heavily into astrology and the spirit world, which is a belief that Pallavi does not share. Krishnan is very scientific-minded, but he tolerates Usha’s superstitions with mild amusement. (For example, when Usha prays, she will say something like, “Protect my child from the Evil Eye so that she may be married.”) Krishnan also doesn’t interfere in the squabbles that Usha and Pallavi might have over Pallavi’s marital status. He tells his daughter that he’s proud of her no matter what.

Out of respect for her mother, Pallavi allows Usha to arrange for Pallavi to meet eligible Indian bachelors who are in the New Orleans area. One such bachelor (played by Satya Nikhil Polisetti) has recently moved from Houston to New Orleans. Pallavi agrees to meet him for a casual blind date at a café.

When Pallavi arrives at the café, she sees a handsome stranger in his late 20s or early 30s who’s seated at a nearby table. They make eye contact in the way that people do in movies where you know they’re going to end up being together. Pallavi’s date is more than an hour late, so Pallavi decides she’s not going to wait any longer and she gets up to leave.

The handsome stranger sees that Pallavi has been stood up for her date, and he goes over to her table and asks her if he can join her at her table. He introduces himself as Sandeep Patel, who works in the technology industry. The attraction between Pallavi and Sandeep (played by Omar Maskati) is immediate, and they end up staying at the café while they talk about their lives.

Sandeep tells her that his family also lives in India. He mentions that he used to run with a partier crowd in New York City. And he used to be engaged to a beauty contestant who was a runner-up for Miss India. Sandeep says that the relationship ended badly, and she attempted suicide after their breakup. “She wasn’t who I thought she was,” Sundeep comments morosely.

Pallavi and Sandeep inevitably begin dating each other. He’s romantic, attentive and seems like the perfect catch. He also has enough money where he buys sapphire earrings for Pallavi just one month after they begin dating each other. Pallavi politely declines the gift because she thinks it’s too much, too soon. She jokingly comments that Sandeep can give her the earrings when they get engaged.

Sandeep seems to have all of the qualities that Usha wants for Pallavi’s future husband. Pallavi thinks that Usha will be happy when she tells Usha the happy news that she’s been dating someone special and describes Sandeep in detail to her mother. However, Usha has reservations because she thinks Sandeep is too good to be true. And when Usha hears about the sapphire earrings, she feels even more alarmed.

It’s eventually revealed that when Usha was in college, she dated a fellow student, who ended up being very controlling and abusive to Usha, so she broke up with him. He took the breakup hard and began viciously stalking Usha until something happened to him to take him out of Usha’s life: He died by falling off of a bridge, not long before Pallavi was born. (The relationship is shown in flashbacks, with Nupur Charyalu as the young Usha and Asad Durrani as the ex-boyfriend, who does not have a name in the movie.)

And guess which gift this boyfriend gave Usha when they were together? Is it a coincidence that Sandeep wanted to give Pallavi sapphire earrings too? The more that Pallavi tells Usha about Sandeep, the more alarmed Usha becomes because Sandeep’s personality and the way that he courts Pallavi are strikingly similar to how Usha’s abusive ex-boyfriend was in the beginning of their relationship.

Meanwhile, the romance between Sandeep and Pallavi gets more serious when he asks her to move in with him and quit her boring office job so that she can pursue her dream of becoming a writer. Sandeep offers to pay all the expenses while she lives with him. Pallavi considers herself to be very independent, so she’s reluctant at first to accept this offer.

But the more Pallavi falls in love with Sandeep, the more she thinks it’s likely that she and Sandeep will get married, so she ends up moving into his large, upscale apartment. She also quits her job to work on a writing project that she’s always wanted to do. Usha isn’t pleased when she hears this news because she fears that Pallavi might be losing her identity and that Sandeep might be too controlling.

And now, it’s Pallavi’s turn to be upset because she thought that her mother would be happy that Pallavi is on track to get married to the man of Pallavi’s dreams. She argues with her mother and accuses Usha of being someone who will never be satisfied with the choices that Pallavi makes in her love life. But what Usha is really concerned about is her growing suspicion that Sandeep might be the reincarnation of Usha’s abusive ex-boyfriend.

Usha confides in her husband Krishnan about her fears, but he scoffs at her and thinks she’s being ridiculous. Usha is reluctant to tell Pallavi because doesn’t want to alienate her and she doesn’t want Pallavi to think that she’s crazy. But Usha’s inner turmoil and concerns about Sandeep become too much for her to bear, and eventually something is done about it in a dramatic way.

“Evil Eye” is not the type of horror movie where bad things happen to people every 15 minutes. Instead, it’s a no-frills thriller that mostly succeeds in presenting various dichotomies within a cohesive story that’s not cluttered with too many characters. There are the aforementioned dichotomies of Indian culture versus American culture; traditional marriage arrangements versus modern dating choices; and superstition versus science.

But there’s an underlying dichotomy that’s less obvious: how society viewed domestic abuse before the #MeToo movement versus how society has viewed domestic abuse since the #MeToo movement. Since the #MeToo movement, certain laws have been passed in many areas that give abuse survivors more chances to get justice. Abuse survivors are also getting more encouragement to share their stories as part of the healing process, whereas before the #MeToo movement, survivors were more likely to be shamed into silence.

This shaming is what Usha experiences—not just from society’s discomfort in dealing with abuse allegations, but also the shame she puts on herself. Usha mistakenly thinks she was somehow at fault for the abuse that was inflicted on her. And she still finds it difficult to talk about her abuse trauma to her own family members. It’s this unspoken communication barrier that affects Usha’s relationship with her daughter Pallavi, whom she fears might experience the same abuse that Usha went through when Usha was young.

As Usha, Choudhury gives a very nuanced portrayal of this inner conflict in how much of her past she wants to reveal to Pallavi. Mani is also very good in her role, although at times her Pallavi character seems a little bit underwritten. It would’ve helped if Pallavi had more of a backstory for her past relationships, so viewers would know if she’s the type to easily fall for smooth-talking charmers.

As for Maskati, his Sandeep character really does give off “too good to be true” vibes from the moment he appears on screen, so there really isn’t much to do with this character but but play the “perfect guy who might have a dark secret.” Sandeep’s over-eagerness with the sapphire earrings gift is a big red flag that something is “off” with him. Therefore, people with enough experience in life and in watching horror movies know that it’s going to be a matter of time before Sandeep’s true nature is exposed.

However, “Evil Eye” directors Elan Dassani and Rajeev Dassani admirably keep the movie focused on the mother/daughter relationship instead of going down the predictable “it’s all about the boogeyman” route that so many other horror films take. The movie’s climactic scene is a little melodramatic and hokey, but “Evil Eye” capably and authentically depicts the cultural and familial conflicts that American children of Indian parents experience when they have to choose one way of life over another. At the heart of Usha’s and Pallavi’s conflicts with each other is their fear that one of them might lose respect for the other. And for many people, not having the respect of your family or a ruined relationship with a beloved family member is a lot scarier than any spirit that might come back from the dead.

Amazon Prime Video premiered “Evil Eye” on October 13, 2020.